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The Commandr in Chief has recied A Letter from a Mr Richd Corbin of Laneville in Virginia— desiring him to cause Enquiry to be made for his Son Dicky , who left his Father in the Year 1775—and went to England to secure family Claim to an Estate in England & in Jamaica—The Father is informed that his Son is now in N. York, & wishes to get a Certainty of the Fact—His Excellency desires you to...
Your favor of the 21st was delivered to me last Evening. You will please to give Capt. Douglass permission to pass within the Enemy Lines, agreeable to his recommendation from Major Turner. But at the same Time, you will, as from me, declare positively to Capt. Douglass, that the proposed Communication for the Exchange of Marine prisoners, mentioned by him, to be opened by Way of Elizabeth...
It is not improbable, that as the Arrival of the Packet at N. York with the news of Peace, Sir Guy Carleton will send out an Officer with dispatches for me, containing that agreable intelligence—in such case, the Officer may be permitted to come to this place and you will send an Officer with him or accompany him yourself as you may think proper. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I am directed, in reply to your Letter of the 17 to inform you that Letters may in future be Sent direct from N. York to Elizabeth Town—I am Dr Sir Your very humble Ser. 20th Your Letter of the 18th just came to hand when the Commander in Chief Returns this Eveng. it Shall be answerd. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
In answer to your private letter of the 16th I can promise no more than a disposition to promote your wishes—& this if it is in my power and circumstances are not opposed to it will carry me to the extent of your desire; but no Peace establishment is yet adopted nor do I know upon what terms it will—whether Continental—State—or any at all. Whether the present Troops (who have part of their...
Sometime in the Winter, or early this Spring, a Frenchman in New York applied (after representing the manner of his getting to that place) for leave to come out—Being a Stranger of whom I had no knowledge and only his own word to support his narrative, I informed him that his application would go with more propriety to the Minister of France at Phila., than it came to me, & referred him there...
I wrote to you a few days ago for some Books, &ca—Since then, I have seen the following Books advertised for Sale by Miles & Hicks at their Printing Office, which I beg the favor of you to procure, and send to me. Charles the 12th of Sweeden Lewis the 15th. 2 Vols History of the Life & Reign of the Czar Peter, the Great Robertsons Histy of America 2 Vols Voltaires Letters. If they are in...
The return of Doctr La Moyuer (who has been sick since he came to this place) affords me an oppertunity of acknowledging the receipt of your several letters of the 20th and 30th of May, and of the 1st and 7th Instt—and to thank you for your attention to the different matters I gave you the trouble of. If the Books which I required in one of my former letters, & were not then to be had are now...
Doctr La Moyaer, by whom I expect you will have received my letter of the 18th had scarcely left this when your favor of the 17th accompanied by Vertots Romish Histy & Watsons History of Philip the III were put into my hands. For sending me the latter unasked, please to receive my thanks—I shall be obliged to you for sending me by the first good conveyence the following Books which are...
I returned to this place yesterday afternoon from a tour of Nineteen days through the Northern & Westwern parts of this State. Upon my arrival I found the enclosed from Mr Rivington accompanied by the Books therein alluded to. Be pleased to thank Mr Rivington for sending them to me, and get Money from Mr Parker & pay for them as (if any thing more was meant) it is upon these terms only I shall...
I have received your favor of the 26th and am much obliged by your attention in procuring the Articles I had requested—I am also glad to find there is at length a prospect that the British will in reality soon take their departure from the United States. Whatever my private sentiments as an Individual may be, respecting the violent Policy which seems in some instances to be adopted; it is not...
I have to reply to your several Letters of the 20 September and 3 & 6 of this Month. The Glass was safely delivered me by Captain Pinkney. I am obliged to you for your information respecting the oppression of some of the Inhabitants of Long Island by the British but as the offence is against the subjects of the State it belongs more properly to the Executive Authority to take cognizance of it,...
I have been honoured with your letter of May 28. inclosing those you had been so kind as to bring for me from America, as I had before been with a note informing me that such letters were in your possession. We had hoped you might have taken your passage in the French packet which might have given us the pleasure of seeing you here. Your arrival however in London was so well timed with respect...
In answer to your Letter of yesterday, you will give me leave to say, that your assistance and advice, has been at all times so usefull and agreable to me, that I should loose the advantage of it with reluctance if it were only for a few Weeks, or even day’s— nevertheless the month of august is so dull and so disgusting & unwholesome in London the Place is so deserted by Men of Business as...
Your letter from Harwich, dated August 10, reached us upon the 11th. We were very glad to hear of your arrival there, and continue to follow you with our good wishes. When you tendered me your services, and asked my commands, I did not know you had any thoughts of returning by the way of Paris; otherwise I should have charged you with a few. I now write by Mr. Short, requesting your care of an...
Col. Franks being detained to day by an accident gives me the opportunity of replieing to your kind Letter last evening received; Col. Forrest had inclosed them to Mr. Adams and we were not a little rejoiced to hear from you after an interval of 4 weeks in which we had spent many conjectures where you was at one time, and where you was were at an other. Mr. Adams received your Letter from...
I have rec d your Favours from Harwich, Amsterdam and Berlin, and congratulate you on your Reception by the King of Prussia. I Shall have much Occasion for your Assistance but Still I would not advise you, to leave Paris without Spending a Week or Ten Days there and being presented by M r Jefferson to the King, provided there is a Court day at Versailles. I have been much pressed with Business...
Last evening col Forrest sent a servant with a Letter addrest to me, but upon opening it, I found I was honourd only with the cover. The inclosed I deliverd the Lady who sat next me but as I could not prevail with her to communicate a word more than “that the cake was good” I threatned her with opening the next unless I should find something in the cover to appease me. But I did not keep my...
The morning after John left me at Dover, that is to say, on Friday, the wind became so favourable as to place me at Calais in three hours. At the moment therefore of your writing your friendly letter, to wit at a quarter before four of that day, I was on the road between Calais and St. Omer and I reached Paris in 48 hours from Calais. Whenever you come again to Paris come by the way of St....
Monsieur de Tronchin, minister for the republic of Geneva at this court, having a son at this time in London, I take the liberty of introducing him to your acquaintance. A respect for the father induces me to this liberty, together with an assurance that the son merits it. He is young and may need a monitor, who, with the gay, may mix the serious, when it becomes necessary to keep him out of...
Having found an opportunity of furnishing myself with a horse here, I notify it to you according to what we had agreed on, to prevent you the trouble of getting me one in England. No news to give you but of the decision of the celebrated cause. La Villette banished. Madame la Motte condemned to be branded and whipped and to remain in a hospital all her life. But it is said the branding and...
Since the receipt of your favor of May 21. I have been in daily expectation of receiving from you a particular state of the cost of my press &c. Mr. Paradise wrote me that it was about five guineas, but I knew there would still be some additions. The moment you will be so good as to favor me with this information I will remit you a bill for that and the eight guineas I formerly took the...
I wrote you last on the 16th. of June. Since that your favors of May 21. 21. and June 12. have come to hand. The accounts of the K. of Prussia are such that we may expect his exit soon. He is like the snuff of a candle; sometimes seeming to be out; then blazing up again for a moment. It is thought that his death will not be followed by any immediate disturbance of the public tranquillity; that...
After a very pleasant Journey, here We are. We came very leisurely, dined the first day at Ingatestone and Slept at Witham, dined Yesterday at Mistley (Mr Rigbys Seat very near) and Slept where We now are, in full View of the Land Guard Fortification, with a fair Sun and fine Breeze. Our Carriage is on Board. As Fortune will have it, Hearn is the Captain. It is my third Passage with him. The...
An opportunity will offer by Mr. Bullfinch of acknowleging the receipt of your favours of July 5. and 18. and as I mean by the same hand to write my American letters, the number of these obliges me to abridge with you. I therefore make this previous declaration that there shall be neither prayer nor compliment in this letter, nothing but a simple tho’ sincere proffer of respect to Madame,...
I had the honour of addressing you on the 9th. of August and since that have received yours of Aug. 23. I have not yet heard of Mr. Adams’s return to London, nor when that may be expected if it has not already taken place. I have nothing public and proper for the post. A letter from Mr. Barclay dated at Mogadore in July shews he was on his return. I impatiently wait an answer from Mr. Adams as...
Being desired by a friend to procure him a copying press I take the liberty of putting the inclosed under cover to you and of requesting you to pay for it and have it sent as therein desired. I wish it may be in time to come with the other articles that it may not multiply my applications for passports. Be so good as to let me know whether Mr. Tessier has any hesitations about going beyond the...
How the right hand became disabled would be a long story for the left to tell. It was by one of those follies from which good cannot come, but ill may. As yet I have no use of that hand, and as the other is an awkward scribe, I must be sententious and not waste words. Yours of Sep. 18 and 22. and Oct. 1. and 4. have been duly received, as have been also the books from Lackington and Stockdale,...
‘Not having any letters on my file unanswered, I shall not trouble you further.’—Is this you?— Did you count 10 . distinctly between the origin of that thought, and the committing it to paper? How could you, my dear Sir, add reproach to misfortune with a poor cripple who but now begins to use his pen, a little, and that with so much pain that it is real martyrdom? However I believe I am even...
According to Mr. Turgot’s idea of a perfect commonwealth, a single assembly is to be possessed of all authority, legislative, executive, and judicial. It will be a proper conclusion of all our speculations upon this, the most interesting subject which can employ the thoughts of men, to consider in what manner such an assembly will conduct its deliberations, and exert its power. The executive...