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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Smith, William Stephens"
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I recd yours this Evening by Lieut. Patterson inclosing a letter from the Board of War directing you to seize the Persons, Carriages &ca that have lately arrived at Lancaster with Cloathing for the British Prisoners and secure the same untill you receive further directions from me or from the Board. As this order was founded upon a misapprehension of facts, I desire that they may be released...
I expected you would have been at Camp with the detatchment under your command before this time but I imagine the Weather and Roads have hindered you. I desire you will lose no time in marching after you receive this; and that you will bring with you all the Men of other Corps that are sufficiently recovered from the Hospitals and properly clad to do duty. I am &c. Df , in Tench Tilghman’s...
[ Totowa, New Jersey ] November 4, 1780 . Approves Smith’s decision to take the place of a retiring lieutenant colonel. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Smith was a lieutenant colonel in Spencer’s Regiment. In January, 1781, he became adjutant and inspector on the Marquis de Lafayette’s staff.
The subject on which you spoke to me yesterday did not strike me in a proper point of view, which prevented my immediately acquiescing in it; but on revolving the matter, I perceive there can be no inconvenience, and wish exceedingly it could take place. If more of the L. Colonels of either of the lines you mentioned are willing to retire than the establishment will permit provided they could...
I have received your favor of the 22nd of April. Having been informed that Colonel Vose wished to return to the Northward, Colonel Tupper was ordered to relieve him previous to the receipt of Your Letter—Nothwithstanding the Marquis had suggested that your being appointed to that Command would be exceedingly agreeable to the Regt. I did not think it could possibly be done, without involving...
I fully intended in my letter of the 14th to have desired you to return to this Army, but I might possibly in the hurry of Business have forgot to give the Gentleman who wrote it instructions to that purpose. Should this find you in Philadelphia, you will look upon yourself fully at liberty to return, or proceed to the southward, should your inclinations lead you to prefer that service to...
Leutenant Colonel William S. Smith entered the service of the United States at the Commencement of the present War In August 1776 he was appointed Aid de Camp to Major General Sullivan with the rank of Major in the Army on the 1st of January 1777 he was promoted to be a Leutenant Colonel in one of the Additional Battalions raised by the CommonWealth of Massasuchets, after which he had the...
I have this Moment received your Application to me requestg Liberty to join the combined Armies in the West Indies, for this Campaign. I applaud Gentlemen the noble & generous Ardor displayed on this Occasion—But having never taken upon me to grant Leave of Absence to Officers in the American Army, with out permission of Congress, your Application shall be conveyed to that Hono. Body—for their...
The enclosed (one for yourself & the other for Major Clarkson) comes in consequence of Generl Knox’s application. To give you such Letters, was My first intention; but not knowing who was to command the Forces destined for the Invasion of Jamaica, I had resort to the Certificates with which you were furnished; conceiving it would appear odd to write, & not be able to direct. or to direct to...
I, a few days ago, reced your favor of the 28th of Augt from Pompton—You certainly cannot be deemed reprehensible for making use of this time of leisure to pay a visit to your family and friends—after so long an absence. When I mentioned you to the Commander of the combined Forces in the West Indies, in the terms to which you allude, I confess I did not imagine you had any intention of...
I have received your favor of Yesterday. From the ill success which I have lately experienced in Attemptg to obtain Alterations in Arrangements made by Congress—I have very little Encouragement to hazardg another—The best Advice I can give you therefore; is to wait the Arrival of the Secretary at War, who is expected here in a short Time; & make your Application to him—As he is in fact, I...
In conducting the common business, at the Post of Dobbs’ Ferry (of which you have the superintendance), You will cause the Orders & Regulations contained in the several written Instructions which will be delivered to you by the present commanding Officer, to be duly attended to & observed—but I have thought it necessary to give you this private Instruction, hereby authorizing you to take such...
I have duly received your two favors of the 27th and 29th Ulto—I am very well satisfied with the account contained in the former; and approve of your conduct respecting the detention of the Flag as reported in the latter, but it will be best under our present circumstances, for you to send back Mr Gardener with his Flag Vessel, at the same time making a representation of his conduct to the...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your two Letters of the 2nd & 3d inst. & to inform you that the matter which has been in agitation is suspended for the present—Notwithstanding which, I wish you to continue your efforts to obtain the best & most particular information in your power. A Command from Hazens Regt will be sent in a few days to relieve the Light Infantry Company at Dobbs’ Ferry....
The Bearer Mr Cutts, upon the recommendation of General Sullivan, has permission to endeavour to get admittance into New York to relieve a Mr Lord a prisoner there—You will be pleased to send his letter by a Flag and permit him to go in should he obtain liberty to do so, or to have an interview with any Gentleman, should that mode be proposed. You will at the same time forward the letters...
Your Letter of the 12th Instant was deliverd me yesterday with its several inclosures, and I am to thank you for the intelligence it contains. I have myself seen the Work at Dobbs ferry, but cannot agree with you as to its indefensible State; it never was calculated to withstand a serious attack, but has always been supposed equal to any small party that might attempt it by a Coup de Main; and...
I am favored with yours of the 20th. The Money you have recd for Governor Harrison agreably to his desire you will be pleased to remit to Mr Saml Inglis of Philadelphia, or inform him it is in your hand, subject to his Orders. I have also to request you will inform Messrs John Channing, Peter Taylor and Aaron Loocock, whose Petition you inclosed to me, that Congress having recommended that no...
I have received your two Letters of the 23rd & 27th instant. It seems strange that such a number of naval Prisoners should be sent on without any provision being made for their subsistence on the way I will mention the circumstance to Mr Morris and will immediately give directions to the Contractors to provide against such Exigencies so far as regards your Post. The Letters for New York are...
You will proceed immediately with a Flag to Paulus Hook and from thence to New York to make the necessary arrangements in your Department with the British Commissary of Prisoners at that place. One servant is permitted to attend you into New York, and the Officer and Party mentioned in the Margin to escort you to the British Out Posts. NjP : DeCoppet Collection.
I have recd your two favours of the 8th with the several Papers enclosed therein, & now send you the Passport requested—the Letters transmitted herewith you will be pleased to have forwarded to their respective addresses. I am Dr Sir. With great esteem Your Most Obedt Servt. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have been favored with your several Letters of the 23d 24th 25th and 27th of Febry. It gives me great satisfaction to inform you, that I fully approve of your conduct in the late attempt to negociate the business of your Department with the Enemy. I am of opinion that giving a Letter of Service to Lts Sutherland & Campbell would be merely eluding the intention of Congress, who by prohibiting...
I have been favoured with your private letter of the 24th Ulto & thank you for the information contained in it. It is much to be regretted that while I am using every means in my power to comply with the orders of Congress (founded in my opinion on our true interest & policy) that there should be such a counteraction as we daily experience from individuals. But more lamentable is our...
Your favor of the 8th instant is duly received. M. Mersereau being out of military office, and retired to the Class of Citizens, his application to me for Liberty to go into New York, is not properly made, but should be addressed to the civil power of the State within which he resides—Independant of this principle, I should have no Objection to granting his request. You may communicate my...
Your favor of the 21st was delivered to me last Evening. You will please to give Capt. Douglass permission to pass within the Enemy Lines, agreeable to his recommendation from Major Turner. But at the same Time, you will, as from me, declare positively to Capt. Douglass, that the proposed Communication for the Exchange of Marine prisoners, mentioned by him, to be opened by Way of Elizabeth...
It is not improbable, that as the Arrival of the Packet at N. York with the news of Peace, Sir Guy Carleton will send out an Officer with dispatches for me, containing that agreable intelligence—in such case, the Officer may be permitted to come to this place and you will send an Officer with him or accompany him yourself as you may think proper. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
In answer to your private letter of the 16th I can promise no more than a disposition to promote your wishes—& this if it is in my power and circumstances are not opposed to it will carry me to the extent of your desire; but no Peace establishment is yet adopted nor do I know upon what terms it will—whether Continental—State—or any at all. Whether the present Troops (who have part of their...
Sometime in the Winter, or early this Spring, a Frenchman in New York applied (after representing the manner of his getting to that place) for leave to come out—Being a Stranger of whom I had no knowledge and only his own word to support his narrative, I informed him that his application would go with more propriety to the Minister of France at Phila., than it came to me, & referred him there...
I wrote to you a few days ago for some Books, &ca—Since then, I have seen the following Books advertised for Sale by Miles & Hicks at their Printing Office, which I beg the favor of you to procure, and send to me. Charles the 12th of Sweeden Lewis the 15th. 2 Vols History of the Life & Reign of the Czar Peter, the Great Robertsons Histy of America 2 Vols Voltaires Letters. If they are in...
The return of Doctr La Moyuer (who has been sick since he came to this place) affords me an oppertunity of acknowledging the receipt of your several letters of the 20th and 30th of May, and of the 1st and 7th Instt—and to thank you for your attention to the different matters I gave you the trouble of. If the Books which I required in one of my former letters, & were not then to be had are now...
Doctr La Moyaer, by whom I expect you will have received my letter of the 18th had scarcely left this when your favor of the 17th accompanied by Vertots Romish Histy & Watsons History of Philip the III were put into my hands. For sending me the latter unasked, please to receive my thanks—I shall be obliged to you for sending me by the first good conveyence the following Books which are...