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I recieved last night your favor of the 9th. inst. mentioning that mr Harris had consigned to your care a bust of the Emperor of Russia for me. be so good as to forward it to this place by any vessel bound to this place, Georgetown, or Alexandria. has mr Harris informed you of the cost or said any thing from which you can infer it, as I could not recieve it but on paying for it? if he has...
Treasury Department, December 1, 1794. “A Bill from you for Ten thousand Dollars in favour of Philips & Cramond has been presented and will be paid to morrow. But though intirely disposed to give effectual support to Messrs. Elliot & Williams and every facility to your House in their Agency for those Gentlemen —I cannot countenance the practice of drawing upon the Treasury without previous...
[ New York, August 23, 1790. The dealer’s catalogue description of this letter reads: “On financial matters.” Letter not found. ] ALS , sold by Anderson Galleries, May 2, 1922, Lot 642. Samuel and John Smith, Baltimore merchants, were brothers.
Mr. Glendye a presbyterian clergyman from Ireland, who settled two or three years ago at Staunton about 40. miles from this place, understanding that there is or will be a vacancy at Baltimore, proposes to go there to offer himself. my personal acquaintance with him is small, but I have had abundant attestations of his character from others. he is a man of excellent character, goodhumoured,...
Letter not found: to Lt. Col. Samuel Smith, 19 Nov. 1777. Smith’s letter to GW of 16 Nov. is docketed in part “Answd 19th.”
The treaty lately concluded between the American and British Commissioners being in a situation to admit of deliberation on its several articles, it is thought highly advisable to avail the Executive of such observations on those relating to commerce and navigation as your intelligence and experience on those subjects will enable you to afford. You will render an acceptable service therefore...
Mr. Bowdoin has not yet proceeded to Madrid, nor will he until further orders, which will not be sent him soon—in the mean time he takes his stand at Paris. but mr Erving, I expect, left London for Madrid in September, where he will act as Chargé des affaires till mr Bowdoin goes on. with him I expect you are personally acquainted, however lest you should not be I have written him a line which...
your Letter of 18th Inst. I receiv’d last night wherin I find you express a desire to be recall’d from fort Mifflin to Join your Corps. I found it Absolutely necessary to reinforce yr Garrison & that it was impracticable to do it consistently without supersedeing you, this determin’d me to send the Baron DArandt as the Person originally mention’d to you to command there, but would have omitted...
Yours of the 12th I received yesterday. I am sorry your attempts to get possession of the enemy’s batteries have hitherto failed. I hope your future endeavours may be more successful. If they once get their batteries fairly erected, the situation of your garrison will no doubt become very trying, but I dare say, they will be duly impressed with the importance of the trust committed to them,...
Your letter of the 20th. inst. to the Secretary of State has just been received at this Office. I have carefully looked over the files of Messrs. Monroe & Pinkney’s Communications, both the joint & seperate ones, and have not been fortunate enough to meet with the American Intercourse bill, to which you allude; nor have I found in the letters of these Gentlemen any intimation of their sending....
I can only lament that necessity which has produced your letter of the 10th, and obliges you to offer your resignation, at the opening of a campaign; at a crisis in which good officers might render the most essential services, by their example and continuance in the army. The proofs you have heretofore given, of your abilities, as a good and brave officer, I am happy in acknowleging; and could...
Yours of the 5th. has been recieved, and not to keep under suspence the person who has offered the gun-powder, I observe that I have from my first coming into office recommended to the Secretary at War never to buy powder ready made, because it will not keep, but to lay in as great a stock as possible of salt petre and sulphur. he assures me our present stock of these articles are equal to any...
[ Fishkill, New York ] October 5, 1778 . Regrets that Captain Edward Norwood cannot be reinstated. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Colonel Pickering in his Letters or Addresses to The People of The United States has represented to the world and Supported by Certificates or Testimonies which Some Persons think plausible, that a corrupt Bargain was made between Yourself and your Brother, on one part and me on the other, that I Should dismiss the then Secretary of State from his office, in consideration of your Votes and...
Richmond, 3 Aug. 1780 . Having already been serviceable to Virginia in obtaining supplies for the army and navy, Smith is requested to state the availability of certain articles in or near Baltimore and the terms on which they can be bartered for tobacco delivered either at Baltimore or the James River, to the end that these items can be procured on the most advantageous terms; with subjoined...
I duly recd. your favor of the 14. and thank you for the candor of your remarks. The enclosed will inform you that it has been thought proper to ask your ideas as to the Commercial articles of the Treaty. The Contents of the Instrument are not precisely such as you suppose; as to the E. Inda. trade particularly. As to impressments also, the question here is understood to turn not on form, but...
You will proceed with the detachment under your command to Dunks’s ferry on Delaware, if you find in your progress the way clear & safe. When arrived there, you will take the safest & most expeditious method of conducting the detachment to fort Mifflin; by water would be easiest & least fatiguing to your men; and if practicable & safe, will certainly be most eligible: otherwise you will cross...
I have received your Letter dated yesterday—giving an account of the reinforcement which you expect from Genl Varnum and the Supplies of Clothing from Genl Forman, it gives me pain to learn that the latter are likely to be so inadequate to your wants, but hope that by taking proper measures the Contributions of the Inhabitants will not prove so poor a resource as you seem to fear. Inclosed is...
I have this moment receiv’d your favor of Yesterday, & hope General Varnum with the Detachment from this Army, have by this time arriv’d to your support, & that your little Garrison will, with the greatest confidence & Vigor, exert itself to baffle every attempt of the Enemy to reduce it —When I last saw General Foreman I authorized him to collect all the Cloathing such as shoes, stockings,...
The list of the vessels detained by embargo at Bourdeaux to which you allude was originally received from Mr. Skipwith, who of course has access to the materials from which it was drawn up, and being the public Agent will doubtless make every use of it, which may be necessary: but it seems proper to suggest that the documents which might have been sufficient for the purpose to which the list...
I thank you for the honor of your letter of the 3d. I know the worth of Mr. Bayard & should be happy to give the proof of it, but in these cases I can give no encouragement untill all the candidates are before me & their cases weighed. I am much obliged by your information concerning him, which coincides with all the testimonies I have seen & indeed with all that I have observed. Most...
Yours of the 23d. came to hand last night. I am unacquainted with the particular conduct of young Yznardi, but if it has been strongly improper I wish his retirement: because having rejected a midnight nomination there, the person substituted should be above exception. I see but one remedy, which is to make mr Yznardi, the father, Consul. [I am] persuaded he can render us better services than...
According to what I had augured, I have this moment recieved mr Jones’s refusal of the Secretaryship of the navy. in mine of two days ago, I mentioned to you this fear, & that in that event I must avail the public of your kind offer to accept the office for a while. I now take the liberty of repeating my request that you will be so good as to come on on Saturday, that we may have a...
Your favor of Aug. 4. came to hand by our last post, together with the ‘ extract of a letter from a gentleman of Philadelphia dated July 10.’ cut from a newspaper, stating some facts which respect me. I shall notice these facts. the writer says that ‘the day after the last dispatches were communicated to Congress Bache, Leib &c. and a Dr. Reynolds were closeted with me.’ if the reciept of...
It is quite agreable to us to take at Port Royal the seventy five Barrels of flour you have purchased there in Exchange for so much we were to expect at Baltimore and any further Quantity you may procure at the former in lieu of the remaining Ballance at the latter place. Mr. John Brown Commissa[ry] for this State has orders to call for it and his Receipt will be good. I am &c., FC ( Vi ). At...
Would it not be better to leave out of the Naval militia bill all the passage beginning ‘And in time of war either actual or imminent Etc. and ending ‘shall have the immediate command of them.’ it would be much more likely to pass if confined for the present to harbor defence, and if hereafter there should be a visible necessity of extending the duties of the Naval militia to our ships of war,...
Your favor of the 22d. is recieved the last night. mr Buchanan shall recieve the appointment of Commercial agent to the isles of France & Bourbon as desired. mr Stacey’s being one of the midnight appointments is suppressed on that ground. mr Lewis who actually holds the former commission will resign. to make this easy to him I wish not to issue the new commission till his resignation comes in,...
I rec’d yours of the 19th informing of the occasion of the late firing. I imagine the Enemy still persist in their attempt as the firing has continued by intervals ever since. As the rear of the Fort is only defended by a picket work, I think you ought to lose no time in throwing up a Bank against the picket which wou’d strengthen it and make it defensible against shot. If some blinds were...
I kept up your letter of the 23d. till the return of Genl. Dearborne enabled us to give to the question of lending arms a serious consideration. we find that both law and expediency draw a line for our guide. in general our magazines are open for troops, militia or others, when they take the field for actual service. besides this a law has expressly permitted loans for training volunteers who...
I have had the pleasure of receiving your two letters of the 16th: instant. The circumstances they announce are upon the whole satisfactory. The zeal which has been called forth by the threatened attack upon the magazine at Frederick is in the highest degree commendable and is an earnest of the ultimate reliance which may be placed on the principles of good Order in our Country. As...