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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Short, William" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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Yours of Apr. 28. from Bordeaux came to hand yesterday as did Mr. Rutledge’s of the 27th. (for I must still have the privilege of acknoleging both together). The incertainty you express whether you come by Nantes, and of course whether this letter (a copy of which goes there) may not get into other hands will very much shorten it. Madame de Tessé, whose constancy to you is above reproach, has...
The Hague, 19 June 1789 . Supposing TJ has departed, he asks Short to acknowledge receipt of two letters to the president and the vice-president, as well as one to Jay. He asks that Short seal the last and forward all three to America, as well as to communicate such good news as he may have from America and particularly of Mr. Jefferson. RC ( DLC ). FC (Dumas Letter Book, Rijksarchief, The...
Mr. George James of Virginia is recommended to me by a friend as of integrity and worth, and on that ground I take the liberty of introducing him to you. He is not sure that his objects in visiting Europe will carry him to Paris, but the possibility of such an event interests him in the means of becoming known to you, and I lend my aid for the purpose the more readily, as it affords an...
We arrived here on Monday morning 28th. Sep. having had no accident on the road, but an axle tree broken on the Phaeton and the bad tire which Rocounier had put on the chariot wheels broke in two places. We have been detained here ever since by the most tempestuous weather ever seen. A ship and a brig, put in in distress, have been driven aground. To-day the wind has lulled, and tho’ as yet...
I think it probable you will have learnt, through other channels, before this reaches you, my appointment as Secretary of the Treasury of the United States. In this capacity the debt due from us to France will of course constitute one of the objects of my attention. Except with regard to a few laws of immediate urgency, respecting commercial imposts, and navigation, the late session of...
The day after my arrivel here the equinoctial gales commenced and have prevailed now for nine days with a fury almost unexampled. Three days ago there appeared a small abatement, we got our baggage aboard a packet and tried to get out of the harbor but it was impossible. For my comfort the weatherwise tell me these winds will continue till the change of the moon, that is near a fortnight...
Our ship has arrived here this evening, and if the wind permits we shall sail tomorrow. We have now lost exactly three weeks by contrary winds: so that in spite of my efforts to be in readiness for a passage between the equinox and winter, we shall surely be thrown late into December and perhaps into January, for our captain tells us we cannot expect less than a nine weeks passage. The ship is...
We are now under way, with a hopeful breeze. The Montgomery for New York on board which is Trumbull, Days , and Mr. Hillhouse, an American goes close along side of us, so that we are in easy conversation with them. Our ships are such equal sailors that we hope to keep together half the voiage if no accident happens. We have agreed on signals of reconnoissance. We go just North of the Western...
I am just returned from Bath where I have been ever since I parted with Mr. Jefferson at Cowes. Perhaps it may not have been notified to you that the Claremont Capt. Colley and the vessel in which Mr. Trumbull sailed for New York proceeded down the channel on the morning of the 23d with a fine wind. This I learn by a letter from our Friend Trumbull who wrote to me by the pilot, when he quitted...
Tho’ a committee of American captains at Cowes had determined we must expect a nine weeks passage, the winds and weather have so befriended us that we are come to an anchor here 29. days after weighing anchor at Yarmouth, having been only 26. days from and to land. After getting clear of the eternal fogs of Europe, which required 5. or 6. days sailing, the sun broke out upon us, and gave us...