Thomas Jefferson Papers
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From C. W. F. Dumas to William Short, 19 June 1789

From C. W. F. Dumas to William Short

The Hague, 19 June 1789. Supposing TJ has departed, he asks Short to acknowledge receipt of two letters to the president and the vice-president, as well as one to Jay. He asks that Short seal the last and forward all three to America, as well as to communicate such good news as he may have from America and particularly of Mr. Jefferson.

RC (DLC). FC (Dumas Letter Book, Rijksarchief, The Hague; photostats in DLC). Enclosures: (1) Dumas to John Adams, 13 June 1789, congratulating him upon his election to an important office by the freest people in the world, enclosing a copy of the Gazette de Leyde in which “votre beau Discours” had been published, giving news of his situation, and soliciting Adams’ support for the mission to the court of Brussels which he had asked Congress to authorize. (2) Dumas to Washington, 13 June 1789, expressing the felicitations of the oldest diplomatic servant of the United States upon his unanimous choice by the “Sages élus pour cet Effet par le Peuple le plus vraiment libre de la Terre,” calling attention to his dispatches to Congress, and repeating his solicitation for Congress to manage their affairs there and at the same time keep him under the protection of the laws of nations by appointing him to the mission to Brussels. (3) Dumas to Jay, dispatch No. 55, 15 June 1789, acknowledging Jay’s communication of 9 Mch. 1789 with its enclosures which he had communicated to the chargé d’affaires of the Elector of Bavaria and also to the Swedish envoy, and enclosing a letter from one William Ruker to the magistrates of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, concerning an inheritance in Germany. (FC of all of the foregoing in Dumas Letter Book, Rijksarchief, The Hague: photostats in DLC; translations of the letters to Washington and Jay, with the communications referred to, are printed in Dipl. Corr., 1783–89 description begins [William A. Weaver, ed.] The Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States of America, from the Signing of the Definitive Treaty of Peace … to the Adoption of the Constitution, Washington, 1837, 3 vols. description ends , iii, 636–43.) The duplicate of the dispatch to Jay contained a postscript not in the one sent under cover to TJ: it described a rumor that had been in circulation for some time, to a certain degree credited, that a general amnesty would soon be declared, though Dumas himself did not put much faith in it; pointed out that people everywhere, especially in the cities, began to be very much discontented at the dearness of bread, which was daily increasing; and said that at Rotterdam lately the windows of fifteen houses were broken and he had been reliably informed that the Patriots were not the sufferers (FC in same; printed in Dipl. Corr., 1783–89 description begins [William A. Weaver, ed.] The Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States of America, from the Signing of the Definitive Treaty of Peace … to the Adoption of the Constitution, Washington, 1837, 3 vols. description ends , iii, 643, as a separate dispatch; this and duplicates of letters to Washington and Adams were forwarded on 19 June 1789 through Amsterdam). John Adams’ address to the Senate was published in the Supplément to the Gazette de Leyde for 9 June 1789.

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