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The occasion which led to your favor of this morning merits all our congratulations, and I heartily join in those you have expressed. The terms of the peace will I hope be satisfactory to our Country. With the events of the war, they can not fail to command the respect of every other. … Be so good as to return the two papers after a leisurely perusal. The newspaper is the latest that has...
Having written to you very lately, I only avail myself of the present opportunity furnished by Mr. Astor, to mention, in case of any delay or miscarriage of the letter, that yours of Decr. 13. was duly received and acknowleged. It was four months on its way, but came at length safely to hand with the books sent with it. Mr. Astor is on a visit to Europe, and will pay his respects to you in...
£32.12.0 Received of R. Rush Esq r Thirty Two Pounds 12 / for Books as per Account for which this is a Duplicate receipt— MHi : Coolidge Collection.
This letter will be presented you by mr George Ticknor , a gentleman from Massachusets whose father is of distinguished standing in that state. this gentleman has been 4. years travelling and and sojourning in the different countries of Europe for the purposes of instruction, and with the same views will pass the approaching winter in Edinburg , Oxford , Cambridge and London
I have received this morning your polite note with an extract from a letter addressed to you by the late venerated President of the United States, and hasten to observe in reply, that I think myself highly honored by the preference shown to my application for a Professorship in The new College, and feel deeply impressed with a sense of gratitude for being thus early made acquainted with the...
I might perhaps agee with Mr Grattan, that Mr Burke had read more of the Brittish Poets than even Dr Johnson, who wrote their Lives, that he understood them better and tasted them with better Judgment and correct discomment; & that he had read the Latin Poets and Orators: but I can go no farther. His uncommon Reading of History, the Law of Nature and Nations of Jurisprudence in General and of...
There is an height, beyond which the proudest Wave cannot ascend: there is a depth, at least a bottom, from which no Waters are left to rise or retire. There is a tide in the Affairs of Men. It is a trite observation of Historians, that there is in human Affairs, an ultimate point of depression, from whence, Things naturally but gradually rise and return to their Level. Our american Affairs...
My good Friend’s when they are going to make a visit to Washington, wish an introduction to the most Eminent public Characters there, and I embrace with pleasure the opportunity of bringing you acquainted with one of our best Divines. He is a gentleman of Liberal Sentiments, both in Religion and politicks—Knowing that he designed a journey to washington, the Electors, have committed to him,...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Rush , & his thanks for the copy of his oration of the 4 th of July, which he has been so kind as to send him, and for his the friendly wishes for he expresses for his health and happiness. to the last nothing contributes more than the contemplation of such specimens as mr Rush has sent him of the eloquence of his country devoted to the celebration...
Your favour of the 20th has given me great pleasure; because it informs me that you are happy. Your Visit to Philadelphia must have been delightful; and the Company of your excellent Surviving Parent on your return, and her domestication with you, and the fair Enchantress must be more So. This family Intercourse cannot be less pleasing to your Mother. It will preserve her health and prolong...
I thank you for the information transmitted me in your Last Letter. I have Sent an extract to my Son—I wish that Congress could be convinced, unawed by Constituents, that parsparsimony to their public officers, is neither wise, just, or prudent, that in the Eyes of foreign Nations, it is contemptible, as well as in those of our own Countrymen, who know our means, that we are become a great...
J Madison requests a Consultation with the Heads of Depts. tomorrow (tuesday) at one OClock, & that they remain to dinner. RC (offered for sale by The Raab Collection, Ardmore, Pa., Catalog 57 [2009], item 11, ID 7973). Docketed by Rush: “Cabinet meeting, Nov: 7. 1814, and remain to dine.” Year not indicated; conjectural year assigned based on the docket. A nearly identical note in JM ’s hand...
The Copy inclosed in your Letter has tenderly affected the little Sensibility that remains in me. As a Memorial of the Friendship of Dr Rush I esteem it prescious. Mark my Words; it is Party Faction and Fashion that give Characters; Truth and Justice, are Studiously omitted neglected and forgotten. Jefferson is no more my Friend Who dares to Independence to pretend Which I was born to...
I thank you for your favour of the 20th and the Extracts which are very consolatory. I have Sometimes thought that the People of the U.S. of both Parties were the worst Judges in the World, of themselves, their Resources, the Character of their own Nation and even of the Geography of their Country. Mr Madisons Administration, must be recorded by Historians; not with Standing all the Errors,...
I must again beg the protection of your cover for a letter to mr Gilmer, altho’ a little doubtful whether he may not have left you. You will have seen by our papers the delirium into which our citizens are thrown by a visit from Gen l La Fayette. he is making a triumphal progress thro’ the states, from town to town with acclamations of welcome, such as no crowned head ever recieved. it will...
I long to See the narrative of Dr Rush’s Life. I hope it will be printed. The Anecdote relative to me, in 1774, and the Toast ascribed to me, at Mifflins Supper, is so exactly like me at that time, that I dare take my Bible Oath, that it is literally true. My toast then was, as you Say and I believe, “Cash and Powder to the Yankees.” You ask me what would be my Toast now? I assure you, it...
“Watchman! What of the Night?” To what hour of the Evening are We advanced? How many hours remain before day break? Have you a repeating Watch that can Strike the hour and the quarter of an hour in the darkest hour of Sablest night? Rochefaucaut, Condorcet, Robespiere, Brissot, Danton, Orleans Buoneparte, Pitt, Fox, Burk, Alexander, Georges, Louis’s, Charleses, Francises Fredericks are but...
My most reverend Dearling presents her compliments. She highly applauds and greatly admires a complaisant Husband. Quare! Entre nous, can you divine whether this is more a civillity to you, or a Satyrick touch at me? For my part I See nothing very wonderful, that a Lady of whose fascinating attractions I have had Such ample information from the very best authority, Should take her Lover away,...
I have recd. the copy of the papers communicated to the B. Parliament which you were so good as to forward. The enterprize of France agst. the Spanish Constitution, with the grounds avowed for it, has afforded G. Britain a fine opportunity for retrieving the character lost by her abandonment of the people of the Continent on the downfal of Napoleon, and by the apparent sympathies of her Govt....
In your favor of May 3. which I have now to acknolege, you so kindly proffered your attentions to any little matters I might have on that side of the water, that I take the liberty of availing my self of this proof of your goodness so far as to request you to put the inclosed catalogue into the hands of some honest bookseller of London who will procure and forward the books to me, with care...
The Volume so kindly presented to Mrs. Madison and myself has afforded us great pleasure. Few can read it without receiving information both new and instructive—and none without being gratified on many points interesting to their curiousity. No part of it will probably be more welcome to the public, than that which gives a hope that the work will be followed by other drafts from the same fund...
J. Madison requests a consultation with the heads of Departments to day at 12 o’clock NjP : Papers of Richard Rush.
I will now venture to congratulate you upon your relief from a part of the heavy burthen which has been imposed upon you for So many months. And above all I congratulate you, my son and myself on your future destination. Had Providence permitted me to choose Events my heart would have dictated none other. Accept my Thanks for your uninterrupted and invariable kindness to me and my Friends, and...
You will observe in one of the inclosed letters several legal points stated by Commodore Patterson relating a distribution of property taken in the Fort on Apalachecola. Will you be so good as to examine them, and communicate the result? The report of the Land Commander has not yet come to hand but will probably not be delayed. It may throw light on some of the facts. In consequence of your...
Your two favors of Jany. 14. & May 2. came duly to hand; the former accompanied by 3 Vols. of Malthus, with a No. of the Quarterly Review, & 4 vols. of Eustace. They claim many thanks which I pray you to accept. I have not yet entered on the latter work. I have looked over Malthus, and think the world much indebted to him for the just views he has given of an interesting subject, and for the...
I have recd. yours of the 2d inst. with the papers inclosed with it, and thank you for having so comprehensively provided for the objects of mine to which it is an answer I return the Proclamation which was properly varied from that of 1806, which had more in view than the one now in hand. To avoid questions or feelings of State Prerogative, I have pencilled for erasure the words specifying...
I have received your favour of the 18th: and thank you has your “Idea”; Your reasoning upon it is that of a modest prudent philosopher & Statesman. It is more; It is classical enough for a member of the Academy of inscription and Belle letters. I who am neither Philosopher Statesman or Academician, would if I had power cause medals to be struck of every conflagration, Massacre, prison stripe,...
At sight pay to the Order of Arthur S Brockenbrough, Proctor of the University of Virginia three hundred and ninety four Dollars thirty two cents, being the Amt. of duties paid by order of Thomas Jefferson late Rector of the University of Virginia on thirty one cases of Marble, imported into NewYork in the ship Caroline, for the use of the said University, and the said duties being remitted by...
You have most unexpectedly procured for me a very high gratification, by making me acquainted with so many anecdotes of one of the most sentimental and accomplished families our Country can boast. I feel myself more nearly attached to Judge Tucker since I learned that he had his legal education under my friend Mr Wythe one of the most learned and amiable men I have known. I have read the...
I have recd. your very kind letter of the 12th. The commendations you bestow on those relating to the Tariff belong rather to what so pregnant & important a subject ought to have made them, than to what they are. They were written to a friend who wished to avail himself of the presumed result of my better opportunities of elucidating the question; and whom I considered as needing such an...