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I was rejoiced when I found the justice of Congress had made some necessary Provision for the office you now hold, altho they withheld a Clerk. I Should have been more gratified if their Liberality had extended to that, and an increase of the Sallery. the Duties of your office, must I am Sure, occupy the greater part of your time; but nothing is harder than to convince the purse holders that...
I duly recd. the English papers you were so good as to send me; and which I now return. Altho’ less interesting than they usually are even when the Parliament is not in session, they contain some things which were worth looking at; and I thank you for the opportunity of doing it. We reached our home without accident, and in the computed time. I found the agricul[t]ural prospects in this...
I have recd. your two favors of the 18 & 20 inst. I am promised a visit from Mr. Jefferson, the ensuing month, and shall not fail to communicate to him, the one you note for that purpose. I readily conceive that Mr. Correa, may feel some conflict, in his present position, between his two characters of Philanthropist and Plenipotentiary; and that he may infer some indulgence towards the latter,...
I owe you many thanks for the early notice which you transmitted me, of mr Adams’s acceptance of the Appointment of State. untill yesterday, I have remaind without any direct communication from him. The Letter which I inclose for your perusal, I regret not having received a day or two Sooner, that I might have had the pleasure of communicating it to the President when he did us the favour of...
I received your obliging favour of july 29th with the inclosure. I had not any objection to your taking a copy. It was my wish that you Should,—altho I hesitated at Saying So, least the partiality of a Parent Should mislead me. I feel that you take an interest in my present happiness, in the Safe return of my Son to his Native Country, altho I have not yet Seen him.—it is no Small...
The Consulship and Agency for Seamen, and claims, at Amsterdam ; Having become vacant by the death of the late Consul of the United States , Sylvanus Bourne Esquire; I beg leave Sir, with Respect to Solicit, and pray of the President of the United States of America , His consideration and pleasure to be appointed to that office; And beg Sir, to be permitted to state: That on the first day of...
I will now venture to congratulate you upon your relief from a part of the heavy burthen which has been imposed upon you for So many months. And above all I congratulate you, my son and myself on your future destination. Had Providence permitted me to choose Events my heart would have dictated none other. Accept my Thanks for your uninterrupted and invariable kindness to me and my Friends, and...
Your two favors of Jany. 14. & May 2. came duly to hand; the former accompanied by 3 Vols. of Malthus, with a No. of the Quarterly Review, & 4 vols. of Eustace. They claim many thanks which I pray you to accept. I have not yet entered on the latter work. I have looked over Malthus, and think the world much indebted to him for the just views he has given of an interesting subject, and for the...
The Procrastination of Old Age must be my only Apology for So long for So long neglecting to acknowledge Several kind obliging and excellent Letters from your friendly Pen. And even now I am arroused to write a Simple Introduction to two Gentlemen Travellers. One is the Bearer, Mr Elliot, a Son of one of our must oppulent and respectable Citizens in Boston, Samuel Elliot Esqr. I believe you...
This letter will be presented you by mr George Ticknor , a gentleman from Massachusets whose father is of distinguished standing in that state. this gentleman has been 4. years travelling and and sojourning in the different countries of Europe for the purposes of instruction, and with the same views will pass the approaching winter in Edinburg , Oxford , Cambridge and London
Your favor of Dcr. 13 came safely to hand; but was four months on its way. I have looked over, with amusement, the two posthumous works of Watson & Walpole. The former has an importance to which the latter can not pretend. But both, in drawing aside the curtain from the secrets of Monarchy, offer at once lessons and eulogies to Republican Government. As you have in hand a remnant of the fund...
Having written to you very lately, I only avail myself of the present opportunity furnished by Mr. Astor, to mention, in case of any delay or miscarriage of the letter, that yours of Decr. 13. was duly received and acknowleged. It was four months on its way, but came at length safely to hand with the books sent with it. Mr. Astor is on a visit to Europe, and will pay his respects to you in...
Your favor of Mar. 1. has been duly recieved, and requires my thanks for the kind offer of your services in London . books are indeed with me a necessary of life; and since I ceded my library to Congress I have been annually importing from Paris . not but that I need some from London also, but that they have risen there to such enormous prices as cannot be looked at. England must lose her...
In acknowledging your favor of Sepr. last, an interval between that date & this, presents itself which would call for apology, were I less sure that you would put no misconstruction on it. The truth is, I well know your time must be so engrossed with objects more important than my correspondence, that I am unwilling to multiply its interferences; notwithstanding the temptations I feel in the...
In your favor of May 3. which I have now to acknolege, you so kindly proffered your attentions to any little matters I might have on that side of the water, that I take the liberty of availing my self of this proof of your goodness so far as to request you to put the inclosed catalogue into the hands of some honest bookseller of London who will procure and forward the books to me, with care...
Since my last which was of Aug: 12. I have been favoured with yours of Aug: 30. with which was returned my letter to Mr Keilsall; whose evanishment is not a little remarkable. Notwithstanding the trouble given you by that letter, I am not deterred from relying on your goodness to have the two now inclosed forwarded to the parties. To one of them the direction is so precise that it will readily...
I took the liberty, in October last, to request you to put a catalogue of books, which I inclosed, into the hands of an honest bookseller, one to whom I might address myself with confidence hereafter without troubling you; and at the same time desired my correspondent in Richmond Cap t Bernard Peyton to remit a bill of 40.£ sterling to be delivered to the Bookseller to be placed by him to my...
£32.12.0 Received of R. Rush Esq r Thirty Two Pounds 12 / for Books as per Account for which this is a Duplicate receipt— MHi : Coolidge Collection.
This will be presented by John P. Wilson Esqr. of this State. I cannot speak of his worth from personal knowlege, but it is well vouched to me by a friend on whom I can entirely rely. He avails himself of resources & a leisure which enable him to indulge his curiosity in a trip to Europe; and he will be so much gratified by being made known to you that I can not refuse him a line of...
Your favor of Novr. 15. came safe to hand, with Mr. R’s farming Pamphlet, for which I return my thanks. The inflexibility of G.B. on the points in question with the U.S. is a bad omen for the future relations of the parties. The present commercial dispute, tho’ productive of ill humour, will shed no blood. The same cannot be said of Impressments and Blockades. I have lately recd. also Mr....
I have been tenderly affected by the kind expressions of your friendship in your letter of the 9th of february. In the course of forty years I have been called to assist in the formation of a Constitution for this State. This kind of Architecture I find is an Art or Mistery very difficult to learn and Still harder to practice. The Attention of Mankind at large Seems now to be drawn to this...
I have deferred acknoleging your favor of May 22. until the reciept of my books should enable me to add that information to the thanks I owe you for your agency in procuring them. I receive them just now in good order. I certainly did not intend you should take half the trouble you have been so kind as to give yourself in the execution of this commission; yet I feel too sensibly it’s benefit...
I have received this morning your polite note with an extract from a letter addressed to you by the late venerated President of the United States, and hasten to observe in reply, that I think myself highly honored by the preference shown to my application for a Professorship in The new College, and feel deeply impressed with a sense of gratitude for being thus early made acquainted with the...
In my note to you, written and sent off in haste, I omitted, though foremost in my mind, to beg you to return my sincere thanks to M r Jefferson as the chief means in the hands of Providence of opening before me a prospect of increased happiness and usefulness and to assure him that, when I consider the importance of the trust likely to be reposed in me, I can safely promise not to fail in the...
Received of R. Rush Esq r Six Pounds Ten Shillings for Books as per Acct— £ 6.10. — MHi : Coolidge Collection.
I have been for some time a debtor for your favor of June 21. which was accompanied by the “Apochryphal New Testament.” Accept my thanks for both. I have not yet seen any notice in this Country of Godwin’s last work; nor has it been reviewed by any of the English critics which have fallen under my eye. I think with you however that it can scarcely fail to attract public attention. It merits a...
I love to see a young, Man, who in the language of Montesquieu is capaple de s’estime beaucoup; but in an old Man this is rather odious than amiable. The kind Compliments in your letter of the 30th. September, make me too proud for a Man in his 89th. year; but your idea of a picture overcame all my gravity and made me laugh outright. What would the Lords of the Gentlemens and Seats in England...
your fav r of Oct. 9. was rec d in due time, and the last envoi of books ment d in it from Lackington came safely to hand. having occn for another call of that kind, to save you trouble I address it to him . directly so as to require from you only the having the lrs put into his hands but I leave it open, lest any thing should have intervened to render any other address more eligible. and for...
I have duly recd. your letter of Mar. 6. accompanied by the English pamphlet on “The State of the Nation.” Keirsall’s [ sic ] “Classical Excursion” had arrived some time before. For these several favours I give you many thanks. Having not recd. at the date of my last, your favour of Sepr. 26. I take this occasion to thank you for that also, and for the accompanying Edinburgh Review. I owe...
I have recd. the copy of the papers communicated to the B. Parliament which you were so good as to forward. The enterprize of France agst. the Spanish Constitution, with the grounds avowed for it, has afforded G. Britain a fine opportunity for retrieving the character lost by her abandonment of the people of the Continent on the downfal of Napoleon, and by the apparent sympathies of her Govt....