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We have the Honor to acknowledge the Rect. of your Excellencies letter of the 23d. Ult. inclosing Copies of the Account & Vouchers founding the settlement of the State of Virginia with Doctor Draper for his depretiation, and leaving it in our descretion, whether to prosecute him for the indemnification of the State, or to take any steps towards establishing the Validity of the transaction...
I have your favor of the 15th. inst. All of preceding date have been already acknowledged. The information which you wished to go to Mr. Guardoqui has been communicated. The real impression made by it cannot easily be seen thro’ the political veil. If he views the state of Western affairs in the true light, his representations to Spain, must convince her that she has no option but between...
Your favor of the 7th. inst. came to hand yesterday. those of Nov. 15. 21. & 28. had been recieved in due time. that of the 21st. covered the assumpsit of Messrs. Pendleton and Lyons to pay the amount of the decree of Royle’s admrs v. Robinson’s admrs, to the use of mr Short. I should sooner have acknoleged these but that in that of the 21st. you mentioned that you had arranged the balance...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned but in JM’s hand. Cover franked by “J. Madison Jr.” and addressed by him to “Edmund Randolph Esqr. Richmond.” Docketed by Randolph, “James Madison March 4, 1783.” The italicized words are those written by JM in the Randolph code, for which see Papers of Madison William T. Hutchinson, William M. E. Rachal, et al ., eds., The Papers of James Madison (6 vols....
Mr. Van Berckel, the resident for the United Netherlands with this government, having, as you will perceive by the copies of his letters inclosed, complained of an infraction of the law of nations by an officer of this state, entering his house and therein serving a process, I take the liberty of putting into your hands the inclosed copies with a desire that you will proceed in such due course...
The posture of affairs in Europe, particularly between France and Great Britain, places the United States in a delicate situation; and requires much consideration of the measures which will be proper for them to observe in the War betwn. those Powers. With a view to forming a general plan of conduct for the Executive, I have stated and enclosed sundry questions to be considered preparatory to...
I am exceedingly sorry for the cause of your detention in Philadelphia, of which your letter of the 24 inst. informed me. But as I expect to leave this place on monday next for Virginia, it would not be in your power to arrive here, by that time, after the rect of this. There will therefore be no necessity for your leaving Mrs Randolph in her present situation to meet me in New York. I am Sir...
I have received your letter of this date and Shall give it that attention which the importance of the subject, to which it relates, demands. When I have made up my opinion on the matter you shall be informed thereof—with very gret esteem I am Sir, Yr most Obedt Sert Df , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DLC:GW . Letter not found, but see GW to Randolph, 11 Feb. 1790 .
I cannot entertain a doubt that Mr. Jaudenes request for a guard ought to be complied with. The protection due to a foreign Minister is absolute and the courtesy of nations dictates that military means shall be used in cases where there may be doubt of the adequateness of the civil—as here where the menace of assassination may require an armed guard. Nor have I the least doubt that the...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Cover missing. Docketed by Randolph, “James Madison Novr. 14. 1782.” Below this date JM added, probably many years later, “to E. Randolph.” By a line dropped for the post, tho’ perhaps too late to get into the mail, and by another by Dr. Tucker who soon followed, I informed you of the reappointment of Mr. Jefferson, that the act passed unanimously & without even an...