Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Randolph, Edmund"
Results 61-90 of 380 sorted by date (descending)
(Private) Dear Sir, Tuesday Morning 19th Augt—94. I sincerely condole with you & Mrs Randolph on your late loss; but as it was an event which had been long expected, I hope she will meet the stroke with fortitude. Under the circumstances wch exist it is by no means my desire that you should attend to the duties of yr Departmt in the City to day—unless it accords perfectly with your convenience...
With no small concern I see myself obliged to inform you, that no progress has been made in the negociation pending between the King my master and the United States on account of the reason I so often gave your predecessor, by writing and conversation, that His Majesty would enter into no Treaty if the powers delegated to the Ministers of the States were not ample or that they had private...
I have this instant received your note of even date with this, and desire if the request of the Attorney-General accords with the unanimous sentiments of yourself and the other two Secretaries, the power may be sent agreeably thereto. I request also, that all the information that can be obtained from the Inspector Neville & the Marshal, may be had as soon as they shall have arriv’d in the City;...
[ Philadelphia ] July [ 12 ] 1794 . “… The items in the inclosed accounts appear … most naturally and properly charges upon the fund for foreign intercourse. The fund alluded … contemplates matters of unforeseen casualty to which no other fund is applicable.” AL , RG 59, Consular Reports: Dublin, National Archives. H incorrectly dated this letter July 11, 1794. See Randolph to H, third letter...
[ Philadelphia, July 9, 1794. On July 12, 1794, Randolph acknowledged Hamilton’s “letter of the 9th. instant.” Letter not found. ]
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his Compliments to The Secretary of State—begs leave to inform him that his opinion on the question lately proposed respecting the instruction of Mr Jay eventually to establish by Treaty a Concert with Sweden & Denmark—is against the measure. The United States have peculiar advantages from situation which would thereby be thrown into common stock without...
My letter of the second Instant will have fulfilled your wish, as to the voucher for the money remitted at your request to Mr. Jay. If you will pay the nine Hundred Dollars concerning the payment to Mr. Skipwith to the Cashier of the Bank of the United States and declare the object of the payment, that matter will be put right. The advance by the Bank was informal & has not come upon the...
[ Philadelphia, July 2, 1794. On July 7, 1794, Hamilton wrote to Randolph : “My letter of the second Instant will have fulfilled your wish.” Letter not found. ]
The Commission for the Postmaster General, is signed and returned. The other for the Marshall of the District of North Carolina is also signed & forwarded by Post. Tomorrow I commence my journey for the Seat of the Governmt. ADfS , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His Secretaries of State. Randolph had sent these commissions for GW’s signature in...
Your letter of the 25th instt enclosing one from Mr G. Morris of the 7th of March, came duly to hand. The measures you have taken in consequence thereof, appear to be expedient & proper. I am sorry to find by his private letters (two of which I send for your perusal, & to be returned) that he & our other Ministers abroad, are continually repeating (& complaining of) their want of information...
[ Philadelphia, June 28, 1794. On June 28, 1794, Randolph wrote to Hamilton : “I have this moment received your note of this day.” Letter not found. ]
[ Philadelphia, June 27, 1794. On July 1, 1794, Randolph wrote to Hamilton : “In answer to the letter which you did me honor of writing to me on the 27th ultimo.” Letter not found. ]
I have duly recd your several Letters of the 20th 21st & 22d instt, with their enclosures. The only matter which seems to require my immediate attention is contained in the last of them. I am not disposed under my present view of the case, to inform Mr Hammond that Our Envoy at the Court of London shall be specially instructed on the point of compensation, for British vessels captured by...
(Private) Dear Sir Mount Vernon June 25th 1794. Monday’s Post brought me your letter of the 18th instant, with its enclosures. The Minister of his Britanic Majesty seems more disposed to be captious than conciliatory. Whether it proceeds from his ideas of policy—the advice of his councellers—or a natural petulance of temper, remains to be developed. The enclosed letter from a Mr Reuben Harvey,...
Letter not found : to Edmund Randolph, 21 June 1794. Randolph wrote GW on 27 June : "The appointment of Mr Pickering, which is mentioned in your favor of the 21st instant from George Town, was noted in my report on the laws."
At five oclock this afternoon I reached this place, and shall proceed on in the morning. Mr Adams’ Commission, as Minister Resident to the United Netherlands, was signed, if I recollect rightly, before I left Philadelphia. If his letters of Credence are forwarded to me by the Post, they also shall be signed & returned to you; to supersede the necessity of his waiting for them in case every...
In answer to your letter of this date, it is only necessary for me to remark, that as you have not stated to me any principle whatsoever; relative to the sailing from ports of the United States of the vessels of nations hostile to each other, that can have dictated the Presidents determination on this point of the 16th cur[ren]t (and announced to me on the 18th) which ought not to have...
I have had the honor of receiving your letter of this date, inclosing the President’s determination with respect to the space of twenty four hours to be allowed to elapse from the departure, from Ports of the United States of vessels belonging to one of the belligerent Powers previously to their being followed by ships of war or other armed vessels belonging to another belligerent Power: but...
(Translation) Sir, Philadelphia 30 Prairial 2 year of the French Republic one & indivisible. (18. June 1794) I have this moment received a letter from the Consul of the French Republic, at Boston, informing me that his suspicions relative to the conduct of Mr Gore have been realised—notwithstanding the opinion of the attornies, notwithstanding the opinion of C. Sullivan, notwithstanding even...
Tomorrow I shall commence my journey for Virginia. My absence from the seat of Government will be as short as I can make it, to answer the purposes of my going. In the interim, occurrences may happen, out of the common routine which might suffer by delay. Where this is the case, & the matter is of importance, advise with the other Secretaries, & the Attorney General, and carry any unanimous...
It is my wish to set off for Mount Vernon on Monday next. With some inconvenience to myself, it might be delayed until Wednesday; beyond which the purposes of my journey would, in a great measure, be defeated by further delay. I therefore desire that everything which requires my attention in your Department previous to my absence, may be laid before me with as much promptitude as the case will...
Pursuant to the arrangement agreed upon between us in conversation I have instructed the Treasurer to remit to Mr. Pinckney bills for 60,449 current guilders and 8 Stivers being according to the computed par of Exchange the amount of the sum allowed to Major General La Fayette by the Act of Congress of the 27th of March 1794. These bills are drawn upon our Commissioners at Amsterdam and will...
My private business requires that I should make a journey to Virginia, as soon as Congress shall have closed their present Session, & If public duties will permit, I shall perform it accordingly. The purposes for wch I go cannot well be answered in a shorter absence than eighteen days, from the Seat of Government. It is my desire therefore, that you would examine all the laws which have passed...
I thank you for forwarding Mr. L’Epine’s letter. Dombey was a man of sense and science, and had resided some years in Spanish America, with which he had made himself much acquainted. Should we have a war with Spain, he would have been a most valuable acquisition to us. I now think it probable that among his papers will be found a good deal of information as to that country, and particularly...
Je Suis chargé par le Conseil Exécutif de la République française de notifier au Gouvernement des Etats-unis, le décrét de la Convention Nationale dont j’ai l’honneur de joindre ici copie. Ce décrét en conservant à nos vaisseaux le Pavillon tricolor, n’a fait qu’en chasser l’alliage de Monarchie qu’on y avait lainé Subsister; ces restes d’un régime honteux ne méritent plus de déparer par leur...
An opportunity now offers of purchasing for the Mint about one Ton of wrought Copper, at the moderate price of 16 pence, Pennsylvania money. It is said to be of good quality and sufficient thickness, so that it need not be melted, but only cut & rolled down to the Cent size. Though we have still a considerable quantity of Copper at the Mint, yet as the above price is much lower than it can be...
[ Philadelphia, May 16, 1794. On May 16, 1794, Randolph wrote to Hamilton and referred to “the note of the Secretary of the Treasury this morning.” Letter not found. ]
Philadelphia, May 14, 1794. “The inclosed papers will inform you of the present state of the affair which in your absence you committed to me, respecting the Swift Packet.” Copy, New-York Historical Society, New York City. The enclosures consist of William Rawle to H, May 8, 1794 ; H to George Hammond, May 10 , 14, 1794 ; and Hammond to H, May 12, 1794 . See also Edmund Randolph to H, May 7,...
Philadelphia, May 14, 1794. “Consider, attentively, the Memorial of Walter Stewart, David H. Conyngham, Joseph Gilpin and J Grubb (with the papers accompanying it, in behalf of themselves & others) and report to me your opinions thereupon.” ALS , RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters, 1790–1799, National Archives; LC , RG 59, State Department Correspondence, 1791–1796, National Archives. On April 24,...
Tho Mr. Bertrand mentions having seen me at Paris, (of which I remember nothing) yet it is evident his letter was meant for me as Secretary of state, and not in my private capacity. The proposition to the government for an assignment of lands can only be answered by the government, if to be answered at all. I therefore inclose you his letter and papers. I also send back 6. packages destined...