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ALS and copy: National Archives This will be delivered to you by M. de Coudray, an Officer of great Reputation here, for his Talents in general, and particularly for his Skill and Abilities in his Profession. Some accidental Circumstance, I understand, prevented his going in the Amphitrite; but his Zeal for our Cause, and earnest Desire of promoting it, have engag’d him to overcome all...
Having been Absent, on a Journey, I had not the Honour of receiving your Letters, until Yesterday when one of the Twenty Eighth of November inclosing a Resolution of Congress of the Same Day, and another of the third of December inclosing a Commission for Dr Franklin Dr Lee and Myself to represent the United States at the Court of France, were delivered to me in Boston. As I am deeply...
LS : South Carolina Historical Society; transcript and two copies: National Archives; copies: Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères, Sheffield City Library We have now the great Satisfaction of acquainting you and the Congress, that the Treaties with France are at length compleated and signed. The first is a Treaty of Amity and Commerce, much on the Plan of that projected in Congress;...
I have the Honour to inform Congress, of my Safe Arrival in this City in the Frigate Boston after a most dangerous, and distressing Voyage of Six Weeks and four Days. The Situation of Things in Europe is so critical, at this Moment that, notwithstanding I am exhausted with the Fatigues of the Voyage, I am determined to proceed, the Day after Tomorrow, on my Journey to Paris. By all that I...
Having had so short Notice of this Opportunity, I can only have the Honour of writing a few Lines, and of inclosing a few News Papers. If the Dispatches of the Commissioners, have not met with uncommon ill Fortune you must before this Time, have received the important News of the Treaty, as well as authentic Information of the Agonies of G.B. Whether she will plunge herself, with uniform and...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; three copies and transcript: National Archives <Passy, May 19, 1778: We enclose for the consideration of Congress a copy of a letter from the comte de Vergennes, and of a letter enclosed with it.> Published in Butterfield, John Adams Diary , IV , 103. That above, May 15, about the misconduct of an American privateer.
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society <Passy, July 16, 1778: We enclose a letter from M. de Sartine that we promised to communicate to Congress. We have no doubt— > See the preceding document and Sartine’s letter of July 14. The draft, without the incomplete second sentence, is published in Butterfield, John Adams Diary , IV , 164. This letter, as explained there, was never sent; the...
Passy, 20 July 1778. printed : JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:168–170 ; also, with “The Function of Consuls” enclosed, in Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 2:650–653. The...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; three copies and one transcript: National Archives <Passy, July 20, 1778: The Spy brought us the ratified treaties with France. On the 17th we exchanged ratifications with the count de Vergennes; copies are enclosed. War is not yet declared but hostilities have already commenced, the British and French fleets are at sea, and we hourly expect news...
We have just received a Message from Monsr. Le Comte De Vergennes, by his Secretary, acquainting Us; that Information is received from England of the Intention of the Cabinet there, to offer (by additional Instructions to their Commissioners) Independence to the United States, on Condition of their making a Separate Peace, relying on their Majority in both Houses, for Approbation of the...
LS : National Archives; copies: Harvard University Library, South Carolina Historical Society (two); transcript: National Archives <Passy, July 23, 1778: We are informed by the Count de Vergennes that the British cabinet plans to offer independence to the United States if it will make a separate peace. M. de Vergennes requests us to inform Congress that war between Britain and France, though...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; three copies and one transcript: National Archives Mr. Livingston received a Commission from us as first Lieut. of the Boston and made a Cruise in her in which she had the good Fortune to take four prizes. He is now obliged to leave the Ship, but we have the pleasure of a Letter from Capt. Tucker in which he gives us an handsome Character of Mr....
I have the Honour to inclose to Congress a few of the public Papers, which contain all the News that is passing. As it is uncertain by what Vessell the Gentleman will go who takes this, the Conveyance is too precarious, to send any Thing which ought not to be known to the Enemy. We are waiting with an impatient Anxiety, to hear from America, the last Accounts from thence having been brought by...
I have the Honour to inclose to congress, the last Gazettes and a Plann of the various Manoeuvres in the late sea fight by which the masterly Movements of the French Fleet in every Situation, and the ridiculous Confusion of the late Lords of the ocean as they called themselves are Said to be truly represented. Whether it was Want of Skill in the officers, or whether it was a Want of Men to...
I have the Honour to inclose, the last Gazettes by which Congress will see the Dearth of News in Europe at present. We expect an Abundance of it at once soon, as We have had nothing from America Since 4. July. The French Fleet went out again from Brest the seventeenth: but We have not yet heard that the English Fleet is out. While the two Fleets were in Harbour, the British East India Fleet,...
I have the Honour to inclose to congress, all the News Papers, I have by me. Enough to shew that We have nothing very important here, at present. The French and British Fleets are again at Sea and We hourly expect Intelligence of a Second Battle. But our Expectations from America are still more interesting and anxious, having nothing from thence, since the 3d of July, except what is contained...
I have the Honour to inclose to Congress, the latest Gazettes. We have no other Intelligence than is contained in them. Since the 11. July the Date of Lord Howes Letter, announcing the Arrival of the Compte D’Estaing off Sandy Hook, We have not a syllable from America by Way of England. In France We have nothing from America Since 3 July. This long Interval leaves a vast Scope for Imagination...
The Melasses business would certainly have proved the source of continual disputes, if it had not been altered; but the mischief which might have been expected from that is beyond doubt comparison less than what is pointed out in my letter to Mr. Lee of 18th. May. My apprehensions on this subject were communicated to the Commissioners at this Court; but I am sorry to say that they made no...
The last letter which We have had the Honour to write jointly to Congress, was of the Twentyeth of July, and as We have Sent Several Copies of it by different opportunities, We hope one of them at least will come Safe to hand. Since our last there has been an important Action at Sea, between two very powerfull Fleets, in which, in our Opinion the French had a manifest and great Advantage, but...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; three copies and transcript: National Archives <Passy, September 17, 1778: Since our last letter, July 20, there has been an important naval battle in which, in our opinion, the French had a manifest and great advantage. Both fleets are again at sea. The British public is amused and the public funds supported by rumors of peace. We are in a state...
I have the Honour to inclose, the latest Gazettes, which contain all the News of Europe. The News from America by the Way of London, which is contained in the Courier de L’Europe of the fifteenth instant, has raised our Expectations and encreased our Anxiety. We are not without Apprehensions that the Compte D’Estaing, may fall in with the combined Fleets of How and Biron. The English are...
LS : National Archives; AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; copies: Massachusetts Archives, National Archives (two); two transcripts: National Archives This will be delivered to you by Mr. Jonathan Loring Austin, who was sent the last Year express to France with the News of the Convention of Saratoga. He has resided chiefly in this Kingdom from that time, and has been employed, in...
I have the Honour to inclose the latest Gazettes by which Congress will perceive, that We have no Intelligence from America, Since the Departure of the Comte D’Estaing from Sandy Hook. Our Anxiety is very great, but We hope that a few Hours will relieve it. In the Midst of a War in Germany, and between France and England, there was scarcely ever a greater Dearth of News in a Time of profound...
We have the Honour to inclose a Copy of the Declaration concerning the 11 and 12 Articles of the Treaty of Commerce, which we have received from his Excellency the Secretary of State for foreign Affairs, in exchange for a similar one signed by us, in Pursuance of the Instructions of Congress. We have also the Honour to inclose Copies of a Correspondence with his Excellency Mr. de Sartine, the...
LS : National Archives; copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, South Carolina Historical Society, National Archives (two); two transcripts: National Archives <Passy, November 7, 1778: We enclose copies of our declaration concerning articles 11 and 12 of the Treaty of Commerce, correspondence with M. de Sartine on rescues and recaptures, and correspondence regarding negotiations with the...
I have the Honour to inclose to Congress, the latest News Papers: As they contain the Speech at the Opening of Parliament, and Some of the Debates in both Houses upon the Addresses in Answer to it, they are of very great Importance. I learn by Some Newspapers, and private Letters that an opinion has been prevalent in America, that the Ennemy intended to withdraw from the united States, and...
I have the Honour to inclose, to Congress one other Copy of the Speech, at the opening of Parliament, together with the Debates in Consequence of it. The Hints in those Debates, especially those given out by Lord Suffolk, are confirmed by the general Strain of Intelligence from London. Letters from Persons, who are supposed to know, announce the Determination of the Cabinet to be, That Clinton...
By the new Arrangement, which was brought by the Marquis de la Fayette I find myself restored to the Character of a private Citizen. The Appointment of a single Minister, at the Court of Versailles was not unexpected to me, because I had not been two Months in Europe, before I was convinced of the Policy, and indeed of the Necessity of such a Measure. But I ever entertained hopes that when the...
My last Letter to Congress, was on the Twenty seventh of last Month Since which an Account of the new Loan is received from London, and as this may perhaps afford to Congress the clearest Proof, of the Weakness of their Ennemies, it is of importance that it should be transmitted to them. Some Accounts Say the Loan is to be seven Millions, others Eight. The Conditions of the Loan are in...
On the Twenty Eighth of February, I had the Honour of writing to Congress, informing them of my Intention of returning home, in Consequence of the new Commission which Superceded mine: on the first of March, I had again the Honour of writing Some interesting Information concerning the unprecedented Interest which the british Government are obliged to give for the Loan of Money, for the Service...
At the Close of the Service, on which Congress have done me the Honour to Send me, it may not be amiss to Submit a few Reflections to their Consideration on the general State of Affairs in Europe, So far as they relate to the Interests of the united States. As the Time approaches, when our Relations, with the most considerable States in Europe, will multiply, and assume a greater Stability,...
Looking over the printed Journals of Congress of the fifteenth day of last April, I find in the Report of the Committee, appointed to take into Consideration the foreign Affairs of these united States, and also the Conduct of the late and present Commissioners of these States; the two following Articles. “1. That it appears to them that Dr. Franklin, is Plenipotentiary, for these States at the...
I had Yesterday the Honour of your Letter of the Seventh of this Month. I thank you, sir, for your obliging Congratulations on my Return to my Family and Country. The Reason why my Letters of the 27th of February and the 1st of March arrived so late, was, that they were delivered at the Time of their Date to Gentlemen, then bound to the seaport who expected to sail directly for America but...
Mr. Schweighauser of Nantes, who is a Native of Switzerland, observing me, as I was, one Day at his House, looking with some Attention, upon a Stamp, of the heroic Deed of William Tell, asked me to take a few of them to America, as a Present from him, which I agreed to do, with Pleasure. He, accordingly Sent, on Board the Frigate a Box, containing as he told me, one Stamp for each of the...
So many Advantages might be derived to the united States in the Conduct of the War; in furnishing the Army and Navy; in augmenting the Value, or at least in preventing the further Depreciation of their Currency; in lowering the Prices of Goods; in Supplying the Wants of the People and in preventing Murmurs and Discontents, that I have ever thought it, of very great Importance, in some Way or...
printed JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams, ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:177–178 . Replying to the president’s letter of 20 Oct. (above), John Adams acknowledged receiving his commissions and instructions and expressed his appreciation of the high honor done him. In regard to his mission, Adams declared that he was determined to...
I have the Honour to enclose to Congress Copy, of the Letter Book of the Commissioners at the Court of Versailles, during the Time that I had the Honour to be one of them. As the Letter Book was kept by me, and almost wholly in my Hand Writing, the Minister plenipotentiary consented that I should bring it home with me leaving him a Copy, which was done. As there may be many Things in it, which...
El Ferrol, Spain, 11 December 1779. Dupl in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, 1, f. 227; docketed: “No. 1 J Adams Esqr original by Capt. Trask from Corunna to Newbury Port, Mass. Bay. Duplicate of Decemb 11th 1779 Original receivd. Recd. May 15. 1780 orig read March 27.” The “original” has not been found. LbC Adams Papers . LbC in JA ’s and in Thaxter’s hand Adams Papers ; notations: “Recd in...
La Coruña, Spain, 16 December 1779. RC in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, I, f. 231.; docketed: “No. 2 Letter from J. Adams Corunna Decr. 16. 1779 Read March 27. 1780.” LbC Adams Papers . LbC in Thaxter’s hand Adams Papers ; notations: “Recd in Congress Oct. 15. Triplicate.”; by Thaxter: “No. 2.” and “NB. Nos. 1 & 2 were sent by Captain Trask bound to Newbury Port from Corunna.” For a...
Bilbao, Spain, 16 January 1780. RC in John Thaxter’s hand PCC No. 84, I, f. 234; docketed: “No. 3 Letter from John Adams Bilbao Jany 16 1780 Read April 7.” LbC Adams Papers . LbC in Thaxter’s hand Adams Papers ; notations: “Recd in Congress Oct. 15. Triplicate.”; by Thaxter: “No.3.” For a discussion of the presence of two Letterbook copies, see part 2 of the Introduction: “John Adams and his...
Paris, 15 February 1780. RC in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, 1, f. 243; docketed: “No. 4 J. Adams Esqr. Paris Feby. 15th: 1780 Read May 15. arrival in France. interesting News.” LbC Adams Papers . LbC in Thaxter’s hand Adams Papers ; notations: “Recd in Congress Oct. 15. Triplicate.”; by Thaxter: “No. 4.” For a discussion of the presence of two Letterbook copies in the Adams Papers , see...
It is necessary that I should inform Congress, in what manner I have been able to procure Money to defray my Expenses, in my long Journey through the greatest Parts of Spain and France, to this City. On my Arrival at Ferrol, I was offered the Loan of Money by the French Consul Mr. De Tournelle, but at the same Time told me there was a Gentleman at Corunna Mr. Michael Lagoanere, who had...
Inclosed are Copies of former Letters to Congress, and I shall continue to transmit Copies until I learn that some have arrived; for which Reason I must request the Favour that his Excellency the President, or some Committee, may be desired to acknowledge the Receipt of Letters, so that I may know as soon as may be what Letters have arrived and which have been less fortunate. The Art of making...
Since my Arrival in Europe I have had the Mortification to see in the public Papers a Series of little Successes which our Enemies have had in the prosecution of the War. The first was a very exaggerated Account in the English Court Gazette of their Successes against the Spaniards in South America. The next was the History of the Repulse of General Lincoln and the Comte D’Estaing at Savannah...
Paris, 23 February 1780. RC in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, I, f. 279; docketed: “No. 8 Feby. 23. 1780 Letter from J. Adams recd. Oct. 16. sends News Papers &c.” LbC Adams Papers ; notations: “Recd in Congress Oct. 15.”; by Thaxter: “No. 8.” and “In No. 8 were inclosed Triplicates of all the former Letters to Congress, and also a Copy of a Letter to the Marquiss de la Fayette, & his...
Since my Letter of the twentieth, I have recieved another Letter from his Excellency the Comte de Vergennes dated the 24th. of February, to which I answered this Day; Copies of both Letters are inclosed. I have also the Honour to inclose a Gazette, and an Application from M. Comyn of Marseilles to be a Consul for the Ports of Provence and Languedoc. I know nothing of this Gentleman, but what...
No. 10. There are so many Gentleman of Rank going out to America, that there can be no doubt Congress will be fully informed of the State of public Affairs. Mr. Lee, Mr. Izard, the Marquiss de la Fayette, Mr. Wharton, and many others, are going by different Vessels. Besides these Monsieur de L’Etombe, who is appointed Consul General of France for the Northern District of America, as Mr. Holker...
RC in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, I, f. 295; docketed: “No. 11 J. Adams Esqr Feby. 29th. 1780 the Gazette mentioned, not inclosd. Read May 15th. requests the Constitutions of each State particularly Georgia & North Carolina.” LbC Adams Papers ; notations: “Recd in congress Oct. 15. Triplicate.”; by Thaxter: “No. 11.” Responding to a request from Edmé Jacques Genet, John Adams asked for...
Paris, 3 March 1780. RC in John Thaxter’s hand ( PCC , No. 84, I, f. 299–300). LbC ( Adams Papers ); notation: “Delivered Mr Wharton 4th March 1780.” printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 3:528–529. In this letter, received by Congress on 19 Feb. 1781, John Adams...
Paris, March 4. 1780.. RC in John Thaxter’s hand ( PCC , No. 84, I, f. 303–306). printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 3:532–534; various American newspapers, including the Pennsylvania Gazette of 17 May and the Boston Independent Chronicle of 1 June. With this letter,...