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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Pinckney, Charles Cotesworth" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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Private Gentlemen— Columbia [S.C.] May 24th 1791. An address to you jointly on a subject of the following nature may have a singular appearance; but that singularity will not exceed the evidence which is thereby given of my opinion of, and confidence in you; and of the opinion I entertain of your confidence in, and friendship for each other. The Office lately resigned by the Honble Mr J....
The enclosed letter, which is under a flying seal, and the plough, which accompanies it, are referred to your inspection—and are addressed to your care, to be transmitted to Mr Chesnut at Camden. With great regard, I am dear Sir, Your most obedient Servant LS , privately owned; LS (photostat), PPRF . Charles Cotesworth Pinckney had introduced to GW the previous summer his friend John Chesnut,...
It is a cause of no small regret that there appears in a considerable part of the citizens of South Carolina a strong disinclination to the law laying a duty on distilled spirits; and that in consequence of it, difficulties occur in obtaining proper characters to carry it into execution. This was the more unexpected as the duty in question has been rendered necessary by a measure peculiarly...
I have duly received your letter of the 25th of May, by duplicates, with the first and second of a set of bills of Exchange for £ 200 sterling, received by you on account of Mr. Church’s bond. Your former remittance of £ 300 Carolina money was also received and I thought had been acknowledged; but I find by your letter that this was not done. It is not easy for me to give you an idea of the...
I found on my return here three days ago your favor of Sep. 6. and am happy to learn from it that the Agricultural society has adopted the plan of employing a person at Marseilles to raise and send olive trees to them annually. Their success in S. Carolina cannot be doubted, and their value is great. Olive grounds in France rent higher by the acre than those of any other growth in the kindgom,...
I duly received your letter of the 6th of September; and have sent an extract of it to Mr Church for the explanation which is necessary. I feel myself truly obliged by your friendly allusion to my unpleasant situation, and for the consolation you are so kind as to offer me. The esteem of the discerning and virtuous must always support a mind properly formed under the pressure of malevolence...
I have been duly honored by yours of the 13th. of Nov. and I now inclose you copies of my letters to Mr. Cathalan of Marseilles and Mr. Fenwick of Bordeaux, which I shall send to them by triplicates, inclosing in each of those to the former, a copy of your letter to him. You will perceive that I have instructed Mr. Cathalan to make any alterations in the plan which you shall think proper to...
(Confidential) My dear Sir, Philadelphia Jany 22d 1794 Although I am not encouraged by the joint letter which I had the honor to receive from you, and our friend Mr E. Rutledge (under date of the 12th of June 1791); yet, in a measure to which I am strongly prompted both by judgment and inclination, I am unable to restrain myself from making a second application to you, similar to the former...
The Officer of Secretary of State has become vacant by the resignation of Mr Randolph. Is the period yet arrived, when the situation of your private concerns would permit you to accept it? As a preliminary mean of information, I have resorted to your letter of the 24th of February 1794; and tho’ the time there allotted for this purpose, is not quite accomplished, there is not much wanting of...
Give me leave to recommend to your civilities Mr. Winstanly the bearer of this an English Gentleman who came to this City some years. After former generosity and carelessness of temper disposes of a little fortune, he has assumed the business of Landscape Painting and in pursuance of his plan visits your County, which also he is desirous through curiosity of seeing before he goes to Europe. He...
Private & confidential The situation of Affairs, and the interests of this Country as they relate to France, render it indispensably necessary that a faithful organ near that government—able & willing to explain its views, and to ascertain those of France, should immediately fill the place of our present Minister Plenipotentiary at Paris. Policy requires that this character should be well...
Duplicate Sincerely commisserating the distresses of the Citizens of Charleston, occasioned by the late unfortunate fires—I take the liberty of offering, through you, my mite toward their relief; without any desire of having my name mentioned. With affectionate regard I am always Yours ALS (duplicate), ScC ; ADfS , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . The duplicate was posted from Alexandria, Va., on 15...
[ New York ] July 11, 1796 . “I received the letter which you did me the favour to write me by Mr. Huger, whose acquaintance I was glad to make. The Bill for 2770 Dollars on Mr. Comfort Sands was received & duly answered.” ALS , Pinckney Family Papers, Library of Congress. Pinckney to H, June 5, 1796 . See Pinckney to H, June 5, 1796, note 9 .
I have received your letter transmitting me a draft on H & S Johnson & Co. for 857 Dollars & 14 Cents on account of Kinloch’s debt to Mr. Church. Lest I should not see you here give me leave to request information in whose care the affairs of Mr. Church have been left by you—& whether any thing more has been done with Mrs Cattle’s alias Bowman’s note. The above bill has been accepted. I...
After furnishing you with the following copies of Letters, it is scarcely necessary to add any thing by way of explanation of my motives for doing it. However, I will briefly add that, from the arrival of Mr Gouvr Morris in Europe, up to the date of his last letter to me in June of the present year, I have received much interesting and useful information from him, relative to the political...
Not being able to recollect with certainty, whether I expressed to you my ardent desire that no favourable occasion might be omitted, by you, of Signifying how much it was my wish, and the wishes of the People of this country, that that friend to it—Mr de la Fayette—could be liberated from his confinement, is the cause of my giving you the trouble of this address. Not in my public character,...