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In the Estimate laid before Congress at their last Sessions, I included as an Anticipation of the late Superintendant of Finance the Amount of a draft issued by him in your favor on the late Receiver of Taxes for the State of New York for Fifty thousand Dollars no part of which appears to have been paid. The circumstances attending this Anticipation not being sufficiently known by the...
The offer of your service as successor to Mr. Duer reached me in due time. I can with truth assure you, that you were one of a very small number who held a competition in my judgment and that had personal considerations alone influenced me, I could with difficulty have preferred another. Reasons of a peculiar nature, however, have determined my choice towards Mr. Tench Coxe, who to great...
In the public letter which accompanies this you will receive such instructions for your conduct in your mission to the Seneca Tribe of Indians, as may without impropriety be communicated to them—Some others shall here be added more peculiarly proper for your own ear. It is particularly desireable that they be made to understand that all business between them and any part of the United States...
I have the pleasure to enclose for you the Report of the Secretary at War upon the papers which were referred to him, relative your transactions with the Seneka Indians in November last. To this satisfactory Report I am happy to add my entire Approbation of your conduct in this business—and am, With very great esteem & regard, Sir, Your most Obedt Servt LS , MHi : Timothy Pickering Papers;...
I have had the pleasure to receive your letters of the 8th and 15th of this month. I feel myself much obliged by the trouble you have taken, in the former, to detail your ideas with respect to introducing the art of husbandary and civilization among the Indians. I confess, that your plan, or something like it, strikes me as the most probable means of effecting this desirable end, and I am...
Letter not found: to Timothy Pickering, 12 Aug. 1791. Timothy Pickering wrote to his brother on 12 Aug.: “this day the President sent me a note, desiring to see me” ( Upham, Pickering, Octavius Pickering and Charles W. Upham. The Life of Timothy Pickering . 4 vols. Boston, 1867–73. 2:496).
[ Philadelphia, August 23, 1791. On August 26, 1791, Pickering wrote to Hamilton : “I have received … your letter of the 23d instant.” Letter not found. ] Pickering had been appointed Postmaster General on August 12, 1791.
I have received the communication which you made to me with respect to a a part of the contingent expences of the general post office, and on comparing the sum you mention with the charges for similar objects, which have been necessarily sustained in this department, and in the public service in general I cannot perceive any thing in the arrangement you propose, but what appears consistent...
The President has desired me to confer with you on the proposition I made the other day of endeavoring to move the posts at the rate of 100 miles a day. It is believed to be practicable here because it is practised in every other country. The difference of expence alone appeared to produce doubts with you on the subject. If you have no engagement for dinner to day, and will do me the favor to...
I enclose the translation of the letter which was transmitted to the Secretary of War by the Governor of New York—The translation was made yesterday in great haste, and if it should not be sufficiently clear, referrence had better be had to the original, in the possession of the Secy of War. The President wishes, in your conversation with Colo. Louis, that you would learn the precise time of...
Colo. Bell of Charlottesville called on me yesterday and informed me that he had recieved your appointment as postmaster at that station, which however he found himself obliged to decline accepting, on account of his frequent absences from home, rendered necessary by his commercial affairs. It was certainly impossible to have named a fitter person, if he would have undertaken it. In the event...
Having from time to time through the winter and down to the present day received repeated information that the post rider between Richmond and Charlottesville, and consequently along the rest of that line, has been and continues extremely unpunctual, sometimes not going even as far as Charlottesville (only 75 miles of the route) for three weeks, and often missing a fortnight, I have thought it...
Captain Ford & Lady arrived here yesterday: they left Niagara the 13th ulto & came by the way of Oswego. He gives me some information of things which took place after we left that country, and which, as they probably will be new to you, I herewith communicate them. He says that Talbot, Brant and Shehan had arrived at Niagara some days before he sailed: that they informed the Governor, that as...
The numerous & various reports which I have received from people who were not possessed of any accurate information with respect to the state of the malignant fever with which Philadelphia is so unfortunately afflicted, and my intention being to return thither, or to it’s neighbourhood about the first of next month, have induced me to ask this information from you—and I beg you will advise me...
I think it may be concluded that the state of the mortal sickness is become more favorable, this appears from the decrease of funerals in the City generally, and at the Hospital at Bush-Hill It is not possible to ascertain, with any degree of precission the degree in which it has abated. The general appearance is pleasing, the Physicians have fewer applications from new patients, the...
I recieved your favor of June 30. […] [the?] 16th. inst. and immediately attended to y[our?] […] will doubtless ere this have informed [you?] […] continue in the office, and as long [as?] […] will execute it with more punctuality, […] since the change of their rider, our letters […] [I a]m with sentiments of great respect […] your most […] PrC ( DLC ); right side entirely faded and illegible,...
Treasury Department , January 2, 1795. This letter is essentially the same as that which Hamilton wrote to Edmund Randolph on the same date. Copy, Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford. On January 2, 1795, Pickering succeeded Henry Knox as Secretary of War ( Executive Journal , I Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. , 168–69). For the differences between...
I have the honor to transmit to you, a Copy of a letter from the Commissioner of the Revenue to me, on the subject of Whiskey to be purchased for the use of the Army in the present year. It has been the custom heretofore, to receive the Whiskey at the Posts of Pittsburg, Whelen and Fort Washington—and as there are no places so convenient for the purpose, I would suggest the policy of...
I have recd. your letter of this day. The estimate of the sum requisite for the Jersey Militia greatly exceeds what I had supposed to be necessary. There are two dangers attending so considerable advances on account without adequate data to guide—One that a good deal more money may be issued from the Treasury than is necessary with the inconvenience of a difficult & perhaps dilatory after...
I have delayed placing the money required by your letter of the 8th. instant, in the Treasurers hands, upon the ground of the doubts intimated in my letter of yesterday concerning the New-Jersey troops. I observe that the first months pay roll is likely to be a bad criterion, as the Troops were successively much diminished before they left the field. I am ready however to do what to you on...
By The President’s order Bw Dandridge has the honor of transmitting to the Secy of War the copy of a Resolution of the House of Representatives of the 21st Inst: & to desire the Secretary to furnish the statement therein requested by the House. ADf , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . On 21 Jan. the House resolved “that the President of the United States be requested to direct the proper officer to lay...
Letter not found: to Timothy Pickering, 17 Feb. 1795. On this date Pickering wrote to GW: “I have been honoured with your note of this morning.”
Congress having closed their late session without coming to any specified determination with respect to the Georgia sale of Lands and the application for the extinguishment of the Indian rights to those Lands; and not having expressed any sentiment respecting the nature of the predatory war between the southern Indians and the southern & southwestern frontiers of these United States, and the...
On considering that part of your letter of the instt which relates to the establishment of a Post at Presqu Isle I have no hesitation in giving it as my opinion that the position is eligable, in several points of view, & that the United States ought to fix one there. The doubt I have is, from whence, in the reduced, & reducing state of the Legion, and the uncertainty of the negotiation of...
Having fixed on monday the 13th instt to commence my journey for Virginia—& made arrangements to do business in the federal city on my way down accordingly —It is my desire that ⟨the⟩ Instructions for Genl Wayne’s government at the treaty which is proposed to be held with the Western Indians in June next, may be laid before me without delay, that I may have time to consider them. It is my...
I have perused the Bill which you sent me for laying out a town &ca at Presqu-Isle. The portion of land allotted for a fortification at that place by the 4th section, is much too small for the object; for if ever the work is assailed, the houses and other obstructions within range of its shot must be removed, or the artillery therein would be ⟨ren⟩dered useless & of course the defence...
By the Presidents order Bw Dandridge respectfully returns to The Secy of War the letter of Mr Monvel signifying his wish to resign his Commission, & informs the Secretary that the President knows no alternative but to accept it. Bw D. also transmits herewith a letter & enclosures from Gov: Mifflin to the President, upon the subject of which The President desires the Secretary to report to him...
It would be eq⟨ua⟩lly imp⟨roper⟩ (on acct of the expence, & other incon⟨venien⟩ces which would attend the measu⟨re) to⟩ continue the militia army in the wes⟨tern⟩ counties in this state, longer ⟨in service⟩ than the nat⟨ur⟩e & exigency ⟨of the case may⟩ require; or, under the reports wh⟨ich pre⟩vail of threatnings ag⟨ainst the Collectors,⟩ & other indications of latent disco⟨ntent,⟩ to disband...
By the Presidents order B. Dandridge respectfully returns to The Secy of War the Report &c. of Colo. Rochefontaine respecting the situation on the Potomac proper for an Arsenal; and informs The Secretary that as soon as he is possessed of every information which can be had from Colo. R. on this subject, the President will be glad to have a conversation with him concerng it. ADf , DLC:GW ; LB ,...
By order of the President Bw Dandridge respectfully encloses herewith to the Secretary of War, some papers which have been laid before the President by the Quakers of Philadelphia & which are intended to be sent to the hostile Indians. The President sees no objection to their being communicated to the Indians agreeably to the wish of the Quakers. The President leaves it with The Secy to...
On the 6 th . I was favoured with yours of the 3 d of this month together with the papers mentioned to be inclosed with it. My information relative to the Indian affairs of this State being imperfect, it has not been in my power to answer your letter with sufficient accuracy at a more early day. Whether the Constitution of the United States warrants the Act of Congress of the 1. March 1793 and...
By the President’s order B. Dandridge respectfully returns to The Secretary of War the several papers respecting the site on the Potomac most proper for establishing an arsenal; and informs the Secretary that after an attentive consideration of said papers & viewing all circumstances The President is of opinion that the site on Conogocheague is the most advantageous & proper, & requests that...
On Saturday morning I received your letter of the 21st instt; with its enclosures. The Post of tomorrow from Alexandria is the first by which I could answer it. If the meeting of the Commissioners, appointed to treat with the Onondagoes, Cayugas and Oneida Indians took place at Albany on the 15th instant, as was expected by the extract of Genl Schuylers letter to the Governor of New York; any...
Hamilton, History John C. Hamilton, Life of Alexander Hamilton, a History of the Republic of the United States of America (Boston, 1879). , VI, 243. John Church Hamilton states that H wrote to members of George Washington’s cabinet on this date. No further evidence of this correspondence, however, has been found.
Your letter of the 27th instant was received by the last Post to Alexandria. I thank you for the information contained in it; as I shall for any further communication of the sentiments of the people respecting the treaty, which you may be able to obtain, and think worthy of transmission: for, as it is an interesting subject, on which mens minds are a good deal occupied, I should like, as far...
At what time should Mr F——ts letter be made known to Mr R——? What will be the best mode of doing it? In presence of the Secs & A: Genl. If the explanations given by the latter, are not satisfactory, whether, besides removal, are any other measures proper to be taken? & what? Would an application to Mr A—— to see the paragraphs in Nos. 3 & 6, alluded to in F——ts letter, be proper? These might...
Accept my Thanks for your obliging Letter of the 14 th . Inst: — The friendly motives which induced You to communicate to me the Information contained in it, will be remembered. The Presidents Firmness on this Occasion adds new Honors to his Character, and confers new obligations on his Country. Of the Expediency of an address I am not perfectly satisfied, altho’ I think it would in many...
I had no time yesterday morning to look into the gazettes; nor did I know until the evening, that the French frigate Medusa had slipped her Cables & put to Sea on the 31st ulto; and was followed in a few hours by the Africa. This circumstance, be the result what it may, I regret exceedingly; & because the effect of the order as it relates to the British will be the same as if the Africa had...
The extreme badness of the Roads prevented my arrival at this place until nine oclock this morning, of course too late for the Mail of this day—Monday therefore being next Post day, which will occasion a delay of three days—and this probably the loss of a passage to Europe of one of the setts of Letters, herewith enclosed, I have thought it best to return them by Express; and have accordingly...
If, when this reaches your hands, there should be no contract or other obligation existing on behalf of the U.S. for the purchase of land on the Potomac, intended for the public Arsenal—I should wish all further negociation in this business to be suspended until proper inquiries can be made and information obtained respecting the property at the junction of the Potomac and Shanandoah Rivers in...
Monday’s Mail brought me both your letters dated the 11th instant —The one containing an extract from Majr Craig’s letter, relative to the conclusion of the treaty with the North western Tribes of Indians, was very acceptable. and I pray you to dispatch Seagrove, & impress strongly upon him the necessity, & the earnest desire of, the government that he would, without delay, effect if it can be...
Your letter of the 11th with two others from you dated the 14th instant, were received yesterday. The summary of the dispatches from Governor Blount, was more agreeable to me than complete transcripts of his letter with the enclosures; and the same practice where information only is intended, may govern in other cases. I am very glad to find that the Creeks are so well disposed for peace with...
Two letters from you, dated the 18th instant, were received yesterday. For the reasons you have assigned, I think it best that Mr Boudinot should fill the Directorship of the Mint; and request he may be informed so. At the same time, urge him to come forward, if for no other purpose than to arrange matters with the present occupant—and derive from him all the insight into the business his...
Your private letter of the 21st instant, did not reach me until yesterday. A late letter of mine to you, will have fixed the Directorship of the Mint upon Mr Boudinot —The application therefore of Majr Jackson, however fit he may have been for the Office, is too late. But besides the reasons assigned in your letter against such an appointment at present, I should have preferred a character...
Two letters from you, dated the 21st instant, and one of the 23d, came to Alexandria by the Post on Friday. I will immediately set on foot an enquiry relative to the prospect of obtaining the lands sufficient for an Arsenal at the confluence of the Rivers Potomac & Shenandoah. From what I have heard of this site, and partly from what I know of it, it must be the most eligable spot on the whole...
Your letters of the 25th, and two of the 28th Ulto have been duly received—one of them accompanied with a copy of the Treaty with the Western Indians—which I shall retain until my arrival in Philadelphia—presuming, if no accident happens, that the original will be with you as soon as the copy could were I to send it by the mail of tomorrow. In one of your letters of the 28th the proceedings of...
This is merely intended to let you know that, your two letters, the one official, the other private, of the 30th ulto have both been received. If the Authors of such resolutions as are forwarded to me, relative to the Treaty with G. Britain mean well they will be benefited by such sentiments as you have communicated to Judge Walton: for nothing short of profound ignorance, or consummate...
Your communications of the 2d Inst. have been duly received. General Wayne will, I hope & expect, leave the Garrisons in his advanced Posts sufficiently respectable. In the present uncertainty of what may be the final result of the treaty with Great Britain, and from the intimations of Captn Brant, we ought not in my opinion to œconomise at too Great a hazard; nor build too much in the present...
Your letters of the 2d & 5th instant came to my hands on thursday last, but it was not in my power, conveniently to acknowledge the receipt of them by the succeeding Post. It is a very singular occurrence that Mr Pinckney should make use of a cypher to which there is no counterpart, or key in the Office of State! A kind of fatality seems to have pursued this negociation and in short all our...
I was Yesterday ^afternoon^ honored with yours of the 10 Inst. enclosing ^a^ copy of your Letter to Mess rs . Lewis and Rawle and ^of^ their opinion on the points stated in it.— Notwithstanding my Respect for the Talents & Candor of those Gen t . I do not ^yet I do not hesitate to say that^ the Cognizance and Powers given to the Commissioners designated in the 6 and 7 articles of the Treaty...