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    • Washington, George
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    • Pickering, Timothy

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As I shall have occasion to remove Colo. Rawlins’s Corps from Fort Frederick in Maryland, (where they are guarding the prisoners,) to Fort Pitt, I must request the Board to call upon Governor Johnston of Maryland to furnish a Militia Guard to releive Colo. Rawlins. I wish no time may be lost in making the requisition, and that the Governor may be informed of the necessity of sending the Releif...
The enclosure, contained in Colo. Henleys letter to me (which with the letter itself is forwarded) needs no comment. Had it come to me as a confidential communication, the transmission of it to you, might have been attended with some embarrassment; but as it is free from this, I have no hesitation in making the government acquainted with this transaction. The presumption indeed, and I hope the...
Your letters of the 12th & 13th instant, with their enclosures, were received by Mondays Mail, the 18th. The duplicate Commission for John Trumbull; the blank Commissions for the Revenue Officers; and the Patents passed by the Attorney General; are all signed & returned under cover with this letter. The want of funds to carry on Commerce with the Indian Tribes (agreeably to a late Act of...
I wish to know whether General Du Portail has made any Arrangements with you respecting Planks for Plattforms, and in that case, what Measures have been taken in consequence. General Du Portail will be able to inform what number of feet will be wanted, and General Knox at what Mills, and by what mode they may be favoured. I enclose a Copy of the Estimate of Articles, which will be required...
Your letters of the 26th and 27th Ulto were received by the Post on friday last. Forwarding without further direction, the Commission appointing Mr Davis Attorney for the District of Massachusetts in place of Mr Otis, after satisfactorily ascertaining those points which had occasioned the hesitation, was perfectly conformable to my intention. I rejoice to find by the account you have given of...
Your letter of the 12th Ulto came duly to hand, but the expectation that Congress would rise sooner than it really did, in the first place; and the supposition that Mr Craik would return home, so Soon as [it] did rise in the next, have delayed my acknowledgment of its receipt, and giving direction relative to the money paid you on my A/c by Judge Addison, until now. But learning from Doctr...
In the public letter which accompanies this you will receive such instructions for your conduct in your mission to the Seneca Tribe of Indians, as may without impropriety be communicated to them—Some others shall here be added more peculiarly proper for your own ear. It is particularly desireable that they be made to understand that all business between them and any part of the United States...
If the detachment now forming, pursues its object, it will be a strong additional motive against having deposits at, and upon the Morris Town Road to this place; because the Troops now on that communication will be considerably reduced, without the means of replacing them. If therefore my former order on this head is not fully complied with no time should be lost in the completion of it. A...
The last Mail brought me your favour of the 24th instant, covering a letter from General Kosciuszko. And presuming that the Attorney General is on his way to Virginia, I hope to receive, soon, the Packets you committed to his charge. Not knowing where Genl Kosciuszko may be, I pray your care of the enclosed to him, as it is probable his movements will be known to you. It is with extreme regret...
(Confidential) My letters to the Secretary of the Treasury of the 4th & 6th Instant, with the present enclosure, conveys fully the sentiments of the Attorney General with respect to the best mode of executing the Act “For the relief and Protection of American Seamen.” He has, since his opinion was transmitted in the above letter of the 6th, consulted two of our most eminent Lawyers, in these...
To the Quarter Master General, or Deputy Qr Mr with the Army. In all cases on the present march, where the Draught Horses or Cattle of the Army shall fail, or where an addi ti onal number shall be absolutely necessary, & cannot be procured by hire, or in any other way except by Military Force; you are hereby authorised & directed to impress such numbers of Horses or Oxen as shall be required...
You have been directed to furnish the Commanding Officer of the Boats with materials for muffling the Oars. to pay particular attention that they are in good order—well provided with oars—mounted on good Carriages and in such a manner that they cannot be injured—that the Horses are with them by Thursday 12 OClock—that they are then removed through the Notch below the mountain, there to remain...
This is merely intended to let you know that, your two letters, the one official, the other private, of the 30th ulto have both been received. If the Authors of such resolutions as are forwarded to me, relative to the Treaty with G. Britain mean well they will be benefited by such sentiments as you have communicated to Judge Walton: for nothing short of profound ignorance, or consummate...
I wrote to you from Saratoga on the 26th Ulto to have all the Boats fit to be used in the western Waters repaired for that service; but since my return from the Northward I am informed the number will be very inferior to my expectation, especially as I directed early in the year to have them got in repair, and recollect no Counter-Order since that time. I have therefore to request that One...
Since writing to you a few days ago, I have been favoured with your letters of the 26th and 30th Ulto. If you should have occasion to write to Mr Parish of Hamburg, you would oblige me, by thanking him in my behalf, for his very polite & friendly offer of sending me any thing I might have occasion for from that place. It would be more formal than necessary, to introduce Mr Bucknall’s...
Your letters of the 24th of the last, and 2d of the present Month, have been duly received; for which, & their enclosures, I thank you. I am not surprised that some Members of the Ho. of Representatives should dis-relish your Report. It contains remarks, and speaks truths which they are desirous should be unknown to the People. I wish the parts which were left out, had been retained. The...
There was never any regular formation of the department of Geographer to the Army, but to the best of my recollection Mr Erskine’s pay was to have been four dollars per day and that of his Assistants two dollars per day—Chain Bearers half a dollar per day and an allowance for the contingent expences of travelling when out of reach of the Magazine of the Army and for the purchase of the...
Private Your private letters of the 29th & 30th have been received. If Mr Churchmans account respecting the broken seal of Mr Monroes letter, to the Department of State be true, it bespeaks the man of candour, and does him credit; but I do not see why, when called upon, he should require time to consider whether he should relate the truth—or “give a certificate that might excite suspicions of...
You will please to take immediate measures to dissolve the chain of Dragoons, and discharge the Expresses stationed between this and Boston; assuring them and the People who have furnished Provisions & Forage that the Accounts will be paid as soon as they can be sent to Philadelphia and the Money obtained—Sheldon’s Dragoons are to join their Corps. An accurate state of the Expences properly...
I shall set out in a day or two for Rhode Island. The command in my absence will devolve upon Major General Heath. I must request you will make every effort to enable the Commissary to throw as ample a supply of provisions as he can into the Garrison of West point, that it may not be exposed to any accident from a sudden investiture—and will do every thing else, that depends on you, to furnish...
The bad state of affairs in your Department, is such as makes your presence indispensably necessary with the Army; The complaints of all, from the Major General to the lowest Staff Officer entitled to keep a Horse, are agravated to the highest possible degree, on account of the continual want of Forage—As a specimen of the distress, which has fallen under my own observation, you may be...
You will be pleased to have the Flat Boats which are in James River mounted upon Carriages as expeditiously as possible and brought in the first instance into the old Field in front of Head Quarters, where they may remain upon their Carriages till wanted—As soon as they arrive you will apply to the Adjt Genl for a subalterns Guard for them. I am sir Yr most obt servt. You will have the Boats...
Your letter of the 27th instant was received by the last Post to Alexandria. I thank you for the information contained in it; as I shall for any further communication of the sentiments of the people respecting the treaty, which you may be able to obtain, and think worthy of transmission: for, as it is an interesting subject, on which mens minds are a good deal occupied, I should like, as far...
At the conclusion of my public employments, I have thought it expedient to notice the publication of certain forged letters which first appeared in the year 1777, and were obtruded upon the public as mine. They are said by the editor to have been found in a small portmanteau that I had left in the care of my Mulatto servant named Billy, who, it is pretended, was taken prisioner at Fort Lee, in...
I had no time yesterday morning to look into the gazettes; nor did I know until the evening, that the French frigate Medusa had slipped her Cables & put to Sea on the 31st ulto; and was followed in a few hours by the Africa. This circumstance, be the result what it may, I regret exceedingly; & because the effect of the order as it relates to the British will be the same as if the Africa had...
I was honored yesterday with the Boards Letter of the 19th Instant. From the apprehensions of the public of an Indian war in the western department, and the earnest applications of General McIntosh for Troops, I was induced the 15 of the month to detach Durkee’s & Ransom’s companies for that command. I am told by Lt Buck that they are halted at Lancaster. As they are detached from this Army,...
Confidential Dear Sir, Mount Vernon 3d March 1799 The unexpectedness of the event, communicated in your letter of the 21st Ulto, did, as you may suppose, surprise me not a little. But far, very far indeed was this surprise short of what I experienced the next day, when by a very intelligent Gentmn (immediately from Philadelphia) I was informed that there had been no direct overture from the...
When I last wrote you on the subject of providing for the Garrison of West Point I mentioned 500 Men as the number which Congress would probably think proper to keep in that Garrison during the Winter—I have been long waiting their determination on this subject but so far from coming to any such decision, the Members with whom I have conversed seem unwilling to lessen the force now existing...
Your letter of the 1st instant was brought to me by the last Post. The Journals of the 1st 2d & 3d Sessions of the first Congress, I have, & no later. These are in folio—one volume of the Senate, and another of the House of Representatives. If no complete set can be had, either in folio or octavo, it would be useless to obtain a copy of what I now possess: but if they are to be continued in...
I have to acquaint you that I propose leaving town on Wednesday or Thursday next, & as I would wish to have you at the Army as soon as you have made the necessary arrangements for your department, I must desire you to acquaint me when you think you will be able to follow me. I am Sir, &c. MHi : Papers of George Washington.