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    • Washington, George
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    • Pickering, Timothy

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Pickering, Timothy"
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Your letters of the 24th of the last, and 2d of the present Month, have been duly received; for which, & their enclosures, I thank you. I am not surprised that some Members of the Ho. of Representatives should dis-relish your Report. It contains remarks, and speaks truths which they are desirous should be unknown to the People. I wish the parts which were left out, had been retained. The...
If you should have conceived, that the letters I have written to you since my retirement from the Chair of Government, worth the room they would take up in your Beaureau; and can readily lay your hands upon one written on the 6th of February in the past year, I would thank you for a copy of the last page thereof. A Press copy was taken of that letter; and all of it, except the last page,...
I have been duly favored with your letters of the 15th & 20th Instant; and received great satisfaction from the communications in both. That General Pinckney not only accepts his appointment in the army of the United States, but accompanies the acceptance with declar[at]ions so open & candid, as those made to General Hamilton, affords me sincere pleasure. It augers well of the aid that may be...
The contents of your letter of the 13th instant, which I received last night, gave me much pleasure; and it has been increased since, by the annunciation (in the Gazettes) of General Pinckneys safe arrival at New York. I hope he will not play the second part of the difficulty created by General Knox. The extracts of letters from our Consuls, & other characters in France to you, are...
The information contained in your letter of the 3d instant was highly grateful to me. Such communications are not only satisfactory to me, but are really useful; for while I hold myself in readiness to obey the call of my Country, it is expedient that I should have more authentic information than News Paper inconsistencies, of the approaching, or receding storm; that I may regulate my private...
This letter will contain very little more than an acknowledgment of the receipts of your letters of the 13th & 18th of last month, which came safe to hand. The letter written by Mr Wolcott to the President of the United States, and the representation made by me to him, so soon as I received official information of the change intended, by him, in the relative Rank of the Major Generals, and of...
Private Dear Sir, Mount Vernon 9th Septr 1798. Your private letter of the first instant came duly to hand, and I beg you to be persuaded that, no apology will ever be necessary for any confidential communications you may be disposed to entrust me with. In every public transaction of my life, my aim has been to do that, which appeared to me to be most conducive to its weal. Keeping this object...
Your letter of the 12th Ulto came duly to hand, but the expectation that Congress would rise sooner than it really did, in the first place; and the supposition that Mr Craik would return home, so Soon as [it] did rise in the next, have delayed my acknowledgment of its receipt, and giving direction relative to the money paid you on my A/c by Judge Addison, until now. But learning from Doctr...
As I never get letters by the Mail until the morning after they arrive in Alexandria, and frequently not for several days, as I am not regular in sending thither, your favour of the 6th instant did not reach my hands until yesterday. Of the abilities, and fitness of the Gentleman you have named for a high command in the Provisional Army, I think as you do; and that his Services ought to be...
Your obliging favour of the 11th instant, enclosing copies of the Instructions to, and Dispatches from the Envoys of the United States at Paris, was received with thankfulness, by the last Post. One would think that the measure of infamy was filled, and the profligacy of, & corruption in the system pursued by the French Directory, required no further disclosure of the principles by which it is...