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    • Washington, George
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    • Pickering, Timothy
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    • Washington Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Pickering, Timothy" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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At the conclusion of my public employments, I have thought it expedient to notice the publication of certain forged letters which first appeared in the year 1777, and were obtruded upon the public as mine. They are said by the editor to have been found in a small portmanteau that I had left in the care of my Mulatto servant named Billy, who, it is pretended, was taken prisioner at Fort Lee, in...
I have given the draughts of the letters to Messrs Pinckney—Humphreys—and Adams an attentive perusal, and approve of their contents. It might however be better, to soften some of the strong expressions in the letter which is addressed to the first of those characters; or to convey them in Cypher, lest they should (which is not improbable) fall into hands they are not intended for. and might it...
Not having seen the conclusion of your Statement for Genl Pinckney (if completed); and not knowing in what manner you propose to sum it up; it has occurred to me that, closing with some such sentiments as the following, might not be improper. That the conduct of the United States towards France has been, as will appear by the aforegoing statement, regulated by the strictest principles of...
As it is very desireable that the papers respecting the discontents of France should be got into Congress, and sent also to Mr Pinckney as soon as possible; if you mean to give the other Gentlemen a perusal of the Statement for the latter, it would save time if this was done as you are proceeding towards the close of that Statemt. It is questionable whether the present, and pressing avocations...
The enclosed letter came under cover to me from the Sister of General Pinckney. Not knowing whether he had Sailed or not, she took this method of forwarding of it to him—and I request you to do this by the first good conveyance. I am Yours affectly P.S. I shall commence my journey for Philadelphia this afternoon—but business with detain me one day at least in the Federal City. PHi : Dreer...
Your letter of the 15th came duly to hand. Fortune seems to have declared for us, hitherto, in the Election, of more properly Selection & ballotting, for the odd Commissioner, under the Treaty with G.B.—But something must be done, & I presume immediately, to supply Mr Trumbull’s place as Agent in the other business, to which he was appointed. I wish most ardently that the flames of war were...
The letter from Mr King to you, is herewith returned. In your dispatches to him, he ought to be instructed to remonstrate in strong terms against those arbitrary, & oppressive Acts of the B: Ships of War & Privateers, of which we have so often complained to little effect; And to press for redress. The moment for doing these is favorable: self respect and justice to our Citizens (especially our...
Your letter of the 11th instant was received by the last Post. Expecting to be at the Seat of Government by the first of next Month (if my Drivers, who have been sick are able to proceed) I shall be concise in this letter. My Sentiments relatively to the appointment of Mr Benje. Bourne, to be District Judge for the State of Rhode Island, were communicated to you in my last, and it is with...
Your letter of the 5th instant with its enclosure, came to hand by Friday’s Post. The extracts therein produced both pleasure & pain—the former at hearing that our Citizens are at length released from their unfortunate confinement in Algiers; the latter to find that others of them have fallen into a similar situation at Tunis; contrary to the Truce, & to the arrangement made with Mr Donaldson....
Your letters of the 17th 20th & 2 0 th instant, have been received. Enclosed you have a Warrant on the Secretary of the Treasury for two thousand dollars for contingent purposes, agreeably to your request. ’Tis well to learn from Mr Monroe’s own pen, "that he trusted the French Councils relative to us were fixed, & that he should hear nothing more from the Directory on the subject he had...