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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Peters, Richard" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
Results 1-13 of 13 sorted by editorial placement
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Yesterday I had the Pleasure of receiving your Letter of the 28 th. of May. M r Beals Intention was not to Stay in Philadelphia more than two or three days, and his absence from this Place was accordingly very short. I thank you, for your obliging Enquiries after him, and for your kind offers of Civility to others of my Friends. I hope e’re long to be in a Condition to receive any Friend of...
Success you say, in yours of the 15 th. stamps a substantial value upon measures, Yet the Motto under a Picture of O. Cromwell, is not without its Justice It is a saying in France, “We can never be ruined, for if our ruin had been possible, it would have been accomplished long ago, since the wisest Heads in France have been these hundred Years employed in doing all they could to effect it”—...
I duly received yours of the 16 of September; of which my hurry has prevented me an earlier acknowledgement. On the subject of your letter I can only say that the present arrangements of the Treasury department include nothing which meets the object; and that every thing future must depend on legislative provision. For the present I can only assure you of my favourable impression of Mr....
Excuse my giving you the perusal of a letter that is tinctured with compliment. Pass these over, and solve the queries & doubts of the author; and you will much oblige Yr Obedt Servt ALS , PHi : Dreer Collection. On the cover of this letter, GW wrote: “Expecting Mr Peters might be in Town, this letter was sent to Colo. [Francis] Johnston’s; not finding him there, & the Ship by which the P——...
Mr Young informs me, by a letter which I have lately received from him, that the accounts, relative to the state of agriculture, which I had collected from various quarters and transmitted to him last fall, have set him afloat on the High Seas of conjecture with respect to the Agriculture of this Country. The account which you had the goodness to prepare for me was among the number of those...
I thank you for keeping in mind my request concerning Oats. For seed I want them. The purchase depends upon three things—yea four. 1 the quality. 2 the time they could be delivered in this City. and 3 the certainty of a passage to the Potomac. 4th not having heard yet from my Manager, how much he requires, I cannot be precise myself as to the quantity. All therefore I would further request of...
If you are done with the Pamphlets & Papers which I put into your hands, be so good as to return them, as the Gentleman from whom they were taken, when sent to you, has had no opportunity yet of forming an opinion on them. Such observations as you have made I would thank you for. Yours &ca ALS , PHi : Peters Manuscripts. The requested agricultural pamphlets and papers originally had been...
My public duties not allowing me to keep pace with Sir John Sinclairs wishes, is the best apology I can make for giving you the trouble of receiving (if you even should not read) the enclosed: and for requesting, if your leizure will not permit you to bestow any attention to his request (which you will find) at the head of the “Out lines of the fifteenth chapter,” &ca that you would prevail on...
Herewith, you will not only receive the Outlines &ca (asked for yesterday) but the Appendix thereto; and other productions from the same quarter; which, when you have done with, be so good as to return. These, or some of the Papers, may be of use to a Committee, if Congress should incline to take up the subject of Agriculture. Your observations, with the return of the Papers, will be very...
I have received with much pleasure, your Agricultural enquiries on Plaister of Paris; and thank you for the honor of, and the affectionate sentiments contained in, the Dedication. I shall be obliged by your furnishing me with two or three more copies of them, one of which I will send by the first opportunity to my correspondent, and zealous supporter of Agriculture—Sir John Sinclair. With...
I have been much delighted with the extract from your collection of fables, and should have told you so sooner, were I less incumbered with a number of involuntary correspondencies, which stand in the way of those which my inclination would cherish. May I hope that “The wise Cooks & foolish Guests” is but a sample of the treat you meditate for your friends, out of the “Aunciente & connynge...
The inclosed having by some accident been mislaid among my papers it is not till now that I am able to forward it to you according to the request of the writer. My short stay in Philadelphia, and an untoward accident prevented my having the honor of seeing you there. The invitation which the society of St. Patrick was pleased to honour me with, and which would have procured me a meeting with...
I should sooner have answered your kind note, my dear Sir, but that I had hoped to meet you the day before yesterday, and to tell you vivâ voce that, even without that, I meant to be troublesome to you in my afternoon excursions: that being the part of the day which business and long habit have allotted to exercise with me. I shall certainly feel often enough the inducements to Belmont, among...