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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Pendleton, Edmund"
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Previous to my leaving N. Y. I recd. a letter from you which was not then answered, because the subject of it required more consideration than could then be spared and because an answer was not prompted by any thing agitated or proposed on the subject, in Congress. I am afraid that notwithstanding the interval which has passed I am still not sufficiently prepared to do justice to your queries,...
Since the receipt of your favor of the 15 Jany. I have had the further pleasure of seeing your valuable observations on the Bank, more at length, in your communications to Mr. White. The subject has been decided, contrary to your opinion as well as my own, by large majorities in both Houses, and is now before the President. The power of incorporating can not by any process of safe reasoning,...
Your favor of afforded me much pleasure by the information it gave of the return of such flourishing health, and has laid me under great obligation by the valuable state it inclosed, of the great question lately argued in the federal Court at Richmond. We are all anxious to learn the decision of the Judges, though there is a report, that they decline giving their opinions, & were that not so,...
I have delayed for some time writing in the daily expectation that I should be able to resume the subject of the Representation-bill the progress & fate of which were mentioned in my last. A motion for reviving it in another form has been some days on the table and is now the order of the day, but has been kept back partly by a general torpor resulting from the critical loss of the bill and...
Your favor of the 8th. did not come to hand till this afternoon. I thank you for the very just & interesting observations contained in it. I have not yet met with an oppy. of forwarding the Report on Manufactures; nor has that subject been yet regularly taken up. The constitutional doctrine however advanced in the Report has been anticipated on another occasion, by its zealous friends; and I...
Your favor of the 14th. came to hand yesterday. You were right in saying “that the Northern Cocks are true game” but have erred in adding “that they die hard on the Representation bill.” Their perseverance has gained them a final victory. The bill passed on friday last in the form in which it was sent from the Senate; that is with the distribution of 120 members among the States, and the...
You will find by the inclosed papers that the President’s Negative has saved us from the unconstitutional allotment of 120 Reps. proposed by the Bill on that subject. The contest is now to be between a ratio of 1 for 30, and 1 for 33 thousand. If the next bill should begin with the former, I think it most likely to end in the latter, this being most favorable to the Northern part of the Union,...
I make use of the opportunity afforded by the return of Col. Hoomes to inclose a parcel of the late newspapers, which may contain some things not in the other papers you get. You will find in them all the particulars known here concerning the affairs of France; and sketches of the business as yet brought before Congress. The Presidents Speech & the two answers are I believe also in the...
I am just favored with yours of the 28th. Ult. I wish I could remove your anxiety for the French. The last accounts are so imperfect & contradictory that it is difficult to make any thing of them. They come also thro’ the Brussels & English channels, which increases the uncertainty. It appears on the whole that the combination agst. the revolution, and particularly agst. their new republic, is...
As you find an amusement in our Newspapers I inclose two of the last; which however contain little of consequence, except a new report from the Treasury Dept. The Mover of the reference which gave birth to it declared he did not mean to authorize a proposition of new taxes, and it appeared that some at least voted for the Motion on that idea. You will find however that a different construction...
Since we had the pleasure of Col: Taylor’s arrival I have left in his better hands the trust of keeping you supplied with whatever communications might interest or amuse you. As the political scene here, is however soon to be suspended, I can not refuse myself the last opportunity I shall have before a dispersion of the dramatis personæ takes place, of enjoying the pleasure I always feel in...
I have recd. your favor of the 30 Ult: and am joined by my partner in the sincerest returns for your kind congratulations and friendly wishes. I hope this will find you in more confirmed health, and enjoying the commencement of a new year with every prospect that can make it a happy one. One of the papers inclosed gives you the latest news from Europe. It is to be hoped that the dawn of peace...
Your favor of Jany. 6., owing to failures of the Mail South of Baltimore, did not come to hand within the usual time; and subsequent delays in the communication consultation & decision of Mr. Giles & myself, on the manner of publishing & applying your observations on the carriage tax, have brought down the return of my thanks for your favor to the present date. I read with real pleasure the...
I have examined into the law of this State relating to slaves coming into it from other States, and find an exception for the case of fugitives which will secure your nephew agst. danger from that source. As the French army however is at this time but beginning to move from Baltimore, I hope the Messenger will recover the slave before he reaches this place. Should it happen otherwise my...
I am extremely sorry for the ill luck which your favr. of the 2d. instant informs me attended the endeavors to regain Mr. Pendletons fugitive negro; and the more so, as his hopes from my pursuit of him will be equally disappointed. I shall write immediately to Col: Jameson on the subject & enclose your description of the negro, and the request of Mr. Pendleton as to the sale of him. As it is...
I this day received information that the Convention had been pleased to reappoint me to the office in which I have now the honor to be serving them and through you must beg leave to return them my sincere thanks for this mark of their continued confidence. I am sorry the situation of my domestic affairs renders it indispensably necessary that I should sollicit the substitution of some other...
Yours of Aug. 3. came to hand yesterday. Having had no moment to spare since, I am obliged to sit down to answer it at a Committee table while the Committee is collecting. My thoughts therefore on the subject you propose will be merely extempore. The opinion that our lands were allodial possessions is one which I have very long held, and had in my eye during a pretty considerable part of my...
Your’s of the 10th. inst. came to hand about three days ago, the post having brought no mail with him the last week. You seem to have misapprehended my proposition for the choice of a Senate. I had two things in view: to get the wisest men chosen, and to make them perfectly independent when chosen. I have ever observed that a choice by the people themselves is not generally distinguished for...
Had it been predicted to you that you would receive a letter from me of this date you would probably have expected it would be from the other side the Atlantic. I had proceeded to Baltimore to embark on board the Romulus. The number of cruisers then off our capes deterred her from sailing. In the mean time I received a copy of the king’s speech, and wrote to submit to Congress a...
I received your favor of the 8th inst. with great satisfaction as it anticipated a proposition I want to make you of interchanging communications sometimes. The termination of the war will render what I can send you less interesting perhaps, while your intelligence will retain it’s value. It is very essential to us to obtain information of facts, of opinions, and of wishes from our own...
Your letter of the 12th. inst. came to hand yesterday. I have the happiness of informing you that on the 14th. inst. we had nine states on the floor and ratified the definitive treaty. Two copies were immediately dispatched by different officers who were to embark in the first vessels they could find going to France. They had 48 days left for it’s timely delivery. The important business now...
Your favor of the 23d. inst. came safely by the last post. Your correspondent of Charlestown who informed you so long ago that an accomodation had taken place between the Russians and Turks was a better prophet than historian. The fact [. . . .] than I beleive, but there are hopes it is so [. . . .] information from our ministers on this [. . . .] tells me he has it from one who has [. . . .]...
We have received no foreign intelligence through any authentic channel lately. We hear however in different ways so as to beleive that the greatest confusion prevails in the British councils. The house of commons on the 16th. of January voted that the ministry (Mr. Pitt and his associates) neither possessed nor ought to possess the confidence of the nation. One account sais Mr. Pitt resigned...
[ Annapolis, 28 Apr. 1784. Entry in SJL reads: “E. Pendleton. Lottery tickets—Trumbull’s proclamation—Western territory—adjournment of Congress—committee states—requisitions—Luz[erne]. Marb[ois]—Eng. news to Mar. 25.” Not found.]
Your favor of the 17th. found me at this place from which I set out the day after tomorrow. I mean to go thro’ the Eastern states in hopes of deriving some knolege of them from actual inspection and enquiry which may enable me to discharge my duty to them somewhat the better. I expect to embark at Boston about the 20th. of June. If you will recur to the Confederation you will find the...
I recieved duly your favour of the 13th. and communicated it to the President. The titles of your relation were unquestionably strong of themselves and still strengthened by your recommendation. But the place was before proposed to another whose acceptance will probably fix it. The President is indisposed with a tumour like that he had in New York the year before last. It does not as yet seem...
I recieved some time ago from mr Edmund Randolph a note signed by mr Lyons & yourself undertaking to pay the amount of a decree of Royle’s admrs v. yourselves as admrs of Robinson, to mr Short or myself as his attorney. this undertaking is perfectly satisfactory, and I only wait your pleasure to be signified as to the time when, and place where it may suit you to make the paiment. as it was to...
I have to acknolege the reciept of your favor of Jan. 29. and as the rising of Congress seems now to be contemplated for about the last of this month, and it is necessary that I settle mr Short’s matter with the treasury before my departure, I take the liberty of saying a word on that subject. the sum you are to pay is to go to the credit of a demand which mr Short has on the treasury of the...
Your favor of April 25. has been duly recieved. were the case of mr Short’s demand one wherein he had left me to decide, I should not hesitate to accept the assurance in your letter in discharge of the US. but mr Short has peremptorily protested against acquitting the US. there was a hesitation on the part of the Secretary of state, whether mr Randolph’s receipt of the money was not by some...
Your patriarchal address to your county is running through all the republican papers, and has a very great effect on the people. it is short, simple and presents things in a view they readily comprehend. the character & circumstances too of the writer leave them without doubts of his motives. if like the patriarch of old you had but one blessing to give us, I should have wished it directed to...