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Your favor of the 16 th I received yesterday your favor of the 16 th inst. informing me that the General assembly had been pleased to appoint me one of the Directors of the board of public works recently instituted by them. the spirit with which they have entered on the great works of improvement and public instruction will form an honorable epoch in the history of our country, and I sincerely...
As the outer letter may be to go into different hands I place in a separate one my thanks for your kind offer of the comfortable quarters of your house in the event of my acting as a Director of the public works. but at the age of 73. volunteer journies are out of the question. those to Bedford are of necessity. for them however I chuse my own time, am there with one or two nights only...
Your favor of Mar. 22. has been recieved. it finds me more laboriously, and imperiously engaged than almost on any occasion of my life. it is not therefore in my power to take into immediate consideration all the subjects it proposes. they cover a broad surface, & will require some developement. they respect I. Defence. II. Education. III. the Map of the state. this last will comprise 1. an...
In my letter of the 2 d inst. I stated, according to your request what occurred to me on the subjects of Defence and Education; and I will now proceed to do the same on the remaining subject of your’s of Mar. 22. the construction of a general map of the state. for this the legislature directs that there shall be I. a topographical survey of each county. II. a General survey of the Outlines of...
I am very happy in any opportunity of endeavorin g to be useful to one of mrs Norton ’s family, with whom I had great intimacy at that period of life when impressions are strongest & longest retained. I fear however that a birth in the offices at Washington will be uncertain. they are rarely vacated but by death. I have written however to the two heads of departments with whom I am more at...
I learn that you have recieved D r Byrd ’s journal on the survey of our Southern boundary , from mr Harrison of Barclay . it is a work I have wished to see, and if you think yourself at liberty, when done with it, to trust it in my hands for perusal only, it shall be promptly and safely returned by mail. if you do not feel entirely free to do this, I will write to request it of mr Harrison . I...
I wrote to the Secretary of State on the subject of mr Arm i stead , and have recieved his assurance that if there is a vacancy, or should be one in any of the departments, he will exert himself to procure it. I wrote to him of preference, because more intimate with him than with any other of the heads of departments, and for a reason still more interesting, which I will explain to you as I...
A considerable time ago I recieved from the Historical committee of the Philosophical society of Philada a letter informing me they were in possession of a MS. volume, which from their description I concluded must be a copy of Col o Byrd ’s journal of the Carolina boundary. it was on that occasion I asked the favor of you to procure me the reading that work. as they meant to print it, they
I am detaining from the Philosophical society their copy of Col o Byrd ’s journal, until I can learn whether I may be permitted to send with it also the supplementary one of which I obtained the loan thro’ your favor. will you be so good as to favor me with the name of the person to whom it belongs, that I may sollicit the permission without troubling you? Does your new bank propose to do any...
If I could refuse you any thing, it would be the request in your’s of the 9 th to submit to the operation of having my bust taken. of all operations it is the most revolting, whether you stand, as was Ciracchi ’s method, or lie down and have your face plaistered over with gypsum , as was Houdon ’s or sit as with the painters. I have no doubt of mr Coffee ’s talents from what you say of him;...
An old balance of account between the bankers of the US. in Amsterdam and myself, believed by us both to have arisen from mistakes in the complicated matters of account of the US which, without being an Accountant, I had to direct, and to give draughts for in behalf of the various cr descriptions of public creditors, was left, under this persuasion by them & myself for further enquiry. in this...
Your favor of Mar. 30. is at hand, and I so far avail myself of your friendship as to inclose you a note for 3000.D. meaning to trouble you only with the first negociation, as the renewals shall be attended to thro mr Gibson hereafter. I can by no means consent to your name being put on it, because in the place you are such a practice would overwhelm you with embarrasments. Jefferson is my...
I recieved at this place, and yesterday only your favor of the 19 th . if it has not loitered on the road, it mus t have been at Lynchburg with which I have but uncertain communications. were a hesitation possible at the request it contains, it would proceed only from the wish to leave at the close of life as clear a state of things as possible for those who are to come after me; to be able,...
The letter to mr Dandridge which you intrusted to me, I delivered the next morning to mr Hunter to be put into the post office at Concord , a mile from his house . he promised to do it the same day himself, and said the stage would take it on this day, and deliver it in Richmond on the 8 th which I trust will be done. certain that I shall not suffer in your hands, I administer to this...
Yours of the 25 th came to hand last night and I sincerely join with you in joy on the passage of the University bill . but it will be in a great measure on paper only with our present funds. the funds we transferred to the public , with what may be saved of the 1 st year’s endowment may enable us to build this year a 3 d and a 4 th pavilion so as to accomodate 4. professors; but after this...
M r Brockenborough , as you describe him, is exactly such a character as we greatly need for our Proctor; but I fear much that altho he would suit us, our salary would not suit him. on this subject I have requested mr Garrett , who sets off to Richmond to-day, to consult with yourself & mr Cabell . Jefferson ’s wounds are nearly healed; but I fear he will never recover much use of his arm....
Your favor of the 27 th is this moment recieved & I now inclose the notes it covered. On the subject of mr Brockenbrough the board of Visitors were very anxious to engage him, and certainly no one more so, nor with so much reason as myself. but there were two ingredients in his propositions , against one of which we were unanimous, and the other was disagreed to by a strong majority. the 1 st...
I thank you, Dear Sir, for your kind aid in my little money embarrasments. I found, on recieving mr Gibson ’s account that there were articles of debet not known to me to the amount of about 1000.D. more than I had proposed to provide for by my note for 2000.D. which render it necessary to enlarge it that much: and I avail myself with thankfulness of the kind offer of your name on the inclosed...
Your favor of the 20 th is recieved, and the great accomodation at the Farmer’s bank , warmly acknoleged; for without it I hardly know how I should have got along; and altho’ the additional 1000.D. from the US. bank will not be wanting longer than it’s term of payment and can be replaced with certainty from before that from other funds, yet I find it necessary for draughts on mr Gibson which...
I have desired mr Brockenbrough to ask your advice as to the best means of remitting to mr Hollins 840.D. on account of the University to meet bills and advances which his present situation would otherwise render inconvenient to him. our money being in Richmond , I hope some means may be found to remit it to him immediately. I will with pleasure write to mr Madison on the subject of the office...
I learnt yesterday from mr Gibson , with extreme regret that I had inadvertently let slip over the day of renewing my note in the farmer’s bank . how I became guilty of this inattention I cannot say, except from the pressure & hurry of business for many days on winding up there at Monticello , my journey to this place, and opening shop again here. I now inclose a note for renewal to mr Gibson...
Your letter of the 5 th finds me under the sever e st attack of rheumatism I have ever experienced. my limbs all swelled, their strength prostrate, & pain constant. but it fills me with affliction of another kind, very much on your account, and not small on my own. a call on me to the amount of my endorsements for you would indeed close my course by a catastrophe I had never contemplated. but...
My letters from Monticello informing me of the President ’s return, I lost no time in bringing under his attention the wish of your son Robert to be placed in our new Southern territories; but unfortunately I had forgotten the particular office he had in view, and having left the letter at home could not have recourse to it. but I supplied the lapse of memory by taking the broader ground that...
Your favor of the 17 th came to hand yesterday, by which I percieve that mine of the 11 th and 17 th were still to be recieved. your’s of the 17 th puts my mind perfectly at ease. I think with you it will be better to place the debt in the form of a bond, and will join you in one on my return. in the mean while I have sent on the notes to mr Marx , to give us time. for the 3 d
I received yesterday only (altho’ in a letter of the 9 th ) notice from the bank of the US. that one of the notes endorsed by me would fall due the 20/23 inst. the other Oct. 17/20. instead of a renewal I have thought it better to execute at once a bond for both. I therefore inclose it to you as executed by Jefferson & myself & needing only your execution to enable me to inclose it to the bank...
By the inclosed which I recieved last night, you will percieve that mr Chisman, Collector of Hampton is dead. the writer, mr Booker, who is unknown to me, recommends Robt. Armistead, also unknown. he says nothing of the politics of the candidate which generally authorises a presumption that they are not with the government. can you, from your present knolege, recommend a successor, and if not,...
Your letters of the 21st. & 23d of Nov. have been duly recieved. every thing respecting yourself shall be arranged to your convenience. I inclose you a letter for old Colo. Newton, open for your perusal. be so good as to seal it, and have it delivered, either letting him know that you are privy to it’s contents, or not, at your choice. should he decline accepting the decision will rest between...
Your favor of the 14th. is this moment put into my hands. the letters which have passed between us on this subject are uncommunicated to any mortal but ourselves, and every thing therefore will be as if they never had been written until you chuse to give them effect. I have but one desire, which is to accomodate to your convenience, knowing that the public interest cannot be better promoted...
Your favor of the 10th was recieved only the last night. I now return you the letter to Colo. Newton, which I will pray you to deliver & use your influence to induce an acceptance. it is in truth only asking him to become responsible for his son, which he would of course do were the office given to his son directly: & it will relieve me from a painful dilemma. shou’d he however refuse, be so...
Retired to your farm and family I venture as a farmer and friend to ask your aid & counsel, in the helpless situation in which I am as to my own affairs. mr Lilly, my manager at Monticello has hitherto been on wages of £ 50. a year, and £ 10. additional for the nailing. he now writes me he cannot stay after the present year for less than £ 100. certainly I never can have a manager who better...
In answer to a letter from mr Randolph on the subject of the judgment v. Robinson’s admn I had mentioned to him that the papers relating to it being at Washington I could not from memory say whether that judgment remained in my hands or was in the hands of mr Gallatin; but that on my arrival at Washington I would look into it & on consultation with mr Gallatin would do whatever the present...
Immediately on my arrival here I examined my papers & found that I had delivered up to the Treasury the copy of the judgment against Robinson’s administrators. I took the first opportunity therefore of speaking to mr Gallatin & desiring him to transmit it to you. he did not recollect the reciept of it, but promised to have it searched for. from him therefore you will recieve it. It seems now...
Th: Jefferson presents his friendly salutations to Colo. Nicholas and incloses him the papers he desired some time ago. he really supposed mr Gallatin had forwarded them about the date of Th:J.’s letter to Colo. Nicholas, until he recieved them from mr G. yesterday. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
A last effort at friendly settlement with Spain is proposed to be made at Paris, & under the auspices of France. for this purpose Genl. Armstrong & mr Bowdoin (both now at Paris) have been appointed joint Comrs. but such a cloud of dissatisfaction rests on Genl. Armstrong in the minds of many persons, on account of a late occurrence stated in all the public papers, that we have in...
The situation of your affairs certainly furnishes good cause for your not acceding to my proposition of a special mission to Europe. my only hope had been that they could have gone on one summer without you. an unjust hostility against Genl. Armstrong will I am afraid shew itself whenever any treaty made by him shall be offered for ratification. I wished therefore to provide against this by...
Your letter of Jan. 20. was recieved in due time, but such has been the constant pressure of business that it has been out of my power to answer it. indeed the subjects of it would be almost beyond the extent of a letter, and as I hope to see you ere long at Monticello, it can then be more effectually done verbally. let me observe however generally that it is impossible for my friends to...
I did not answer your friendly letter of July 7. because the subject was voluminous, business pressed, & I expected sooner to have seen you here, & to have answered it more satisfactorily in conversation. your opinions were not the less useful in confirming us in our course. we differ not in opinion, except as to the time of calling Congress, which we fixed for the 26th. of October for reasons...
I some time ago recieved a letter from Burgess Griffin desiring me to pay to you the amount of his crop of tobacco. he happens not to have named the amount, and I left his papers at Monticello which would have informed me of it. my memory tells me it was two hundred and some odd dollars, but the exact sum I cannot recollect. perhaps he has named it to you. if so, be so good as to inform me of...
Mr Isaac Briggs, of the adjoining state of Maryland, being desirous of employment in some part of the superintendance of the manufacturing company of Baltimore, has asked me to say what I know of him to yourself as a channel through which it may be conveyed to those on whom his emploiment may depend. he was the keeper of a school in this neighborhood with whom I became acquainted accidentally....
You observed yesterday in conversation that the Feds say I have given them every thing from Gr. Britain & little from France. but the reason is we have little from France, and much from England. From France I have communicated 1. Armstrong’s letter to Champagny & his answer avowing the extension of the Berlin decree to us. 2. Armstrong’s letter to him on the doctrine to that effect laid down...
Th: Jefferson: presents his friendly salutations to mr Nicholas and incloses him a check on the bank of the US. for 300 Dollars, by direction of Burgess Griffin to whose credit mr Nicholas will be pleased to place it. ViU .
Your favor of the 18th. is duly recieved. be assured that I value no act of friendship so highly as the communicating facts to me which I am not in the way of knowing otherwise, and could not therefore otherwise guard against. I have had too many proofs of your friendship not to be sensible of the kindness of these communications, and to recieve them with peculiar obligation. the reciept of mr...
I always consider it as the most friendly office which can be rendered me, to be informed of any thing which is going amiss, and which I can remedy. I had known that there had been a very blameable failure in the cloathing department, which had not become known so as to be remedied, till the beginning of October. but I had believed that the remedy had then been applied with as much diligence...