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My letters from Monticello informing me of the President ’s return, I lost no time in bringing under his attention the wish of your son Robert to be placed in our new Southern territories; but unfortunately I had forgotten the particular office he had in view, and having left the letter at home could not have recourse to it. but I supplied the lapse of memory by taking the broader ground that...
Your favor of Mar. 22. has been recieved. it finds me more laboriously, and imperiously engaged than almost on any occasion of my life. it is not therefore in my power to take into immediate consideration all the subjects it proposes. they cover a broad surface, & will require some developement. they respect I. Defence. II. Education. III. the Map of the state. this last will comprise 1. an...
I did not know, till mr Patterson called on us, a few days ago, that you had passed on to Washington . I had recently observed in the debates of Congress , a matter introduced, on which I wished to give explanations more fully in conversation which I will now do by abridgment in writing. mr Randolph has proposed an enquiry into certain prosecutions at Common law in Connecticut , for libels on...
In my letter of the 2 d inst. I stated, according to your request what occurred to me on the subjects of Defence and Education; and I will now proceed to do the same on the remaining subject of your’s of Mar. 22. the construction of a general map of the state. for this the legislature directs that there shall be I. a topographical survey of each county. II. a General survey of the Outlines of...
Your letter of Jan. 20. was recieved in due time, but such has been the constant pressure of business that it has been out of my power to answer it. indeed the subjects of it would be almost beyond the extent of a letter, and as I hope to see you ere long at Monticello, it can then be more effectually done verbally. let me observe however generally that it is impossible for my friends to...
I am sorry to hear of your attack of rheumatism both on your own account & that of the public, & as I think you will have to go on as soon as you are able. I believe that immediately on the pacification with England , a vessel was dispatched to France for the Ultimatum of that government as I presume. Turreau was earnest in giving assurances that Napoleon would revoke his decrees, considering...
A last effort at friendly settlement with Spain is proposed to be made at Paris, & under the auspices of France. for this purpose Genl. Armstrong & mr Bowdoin (both now at Paris) have been appointed joint Comrs. but such a cloud of dissatisfaction rests on Genl. Armstrong in the minds of many persons, on account of a late occurrence stated in all the public papers, that we have in...
Your’s of the 14th. is recieved, and every thing you have done in the affair therein mentioned meets my approbation & thanks. I reserve details until I can see you.   the offices filled & to be filled under the Missisipi law, are a Register for the Eastern & another for the Western district at 500. D. a year. a Reciever of public monies for each district. two Commissioners for each district at...
I received yesterday only (altho’ in a letter of the 9 th ) notice from the bank of the US. that one of the notes endorsed by me would fall due the 20/23 inst. the other Oct. 17/20. instead of a renewal I have thought it better to execute at once a bond for both. I therefore inclose it to you as executed by Jefferson & myself & needing only your execution to enable me to inclose it to the bank...
Mr. Jefferson the bearer hereof is not entirely unknown to you I believe. He asks of me however a line of introduction. He is a candidate for the office rendered vacant by the death of Mr. Hay, and he wishes me to say to you what I know of him. He has respectable talents, is well-read in the law, and is a good republican, and a very honest man. If no fitter person offers, I need not ask your...
Your letters of the 21st. & 23d of Nov. have been duly recieved. every thing respecting yourself shall be arranged to your convenience. I inclose you a letter for old Colo. Newton, open for your perusal. be so good as to seal it, and have it delivered, either letting him know that you are privy to it’s contents, or not, at your choice. should he decline accepting the decision will rest between...
I now inclose you the Agricultural catalogue . I do not know whether I have made it more or less comprehensive than you wished. but in either case you can make it what it should be by reduction or addition. there are probably other good books with which I am unacquainted. I do not possess the Geoponica, nor Rozier’s dictionary. all the others I have & set them down on my own knolege, except...
In a letter of Apr. 15. I informed mr Gallatin of what had passed between us here, and desired him to take measures for winding up the commission at Norfolk with as little delay as should be consistent with a resignation. he says in an answer of the 19th. ‘no previous movement here, nor time is wanted for winding up mr Davies’s business; but on being informed of mr N’s intention to accept, I...
The bearer hereof Majr. Faire is the person whom Mr. Madison and myself mentioned as proposing to set up a glass manufactory. We had recommended James river to him. In passing thro’ Culpeper however he had almost or even quite determined to fix there: induced principally by the offers of credit for their provisions, for the expence of first establishment being great, and their capital not so,...
On enquiry of mr Randolph I find his process for rolling his seed corn in plaister varies a little from what I told you. he first dilutes the tar with water stirred into it to such a consistency as will make the plaister adhere. corn is then put into a trough & diluted tar poured on it & stirred till the whole of the grains are perfectly coated. there must be no surplus of the tar more than...
I learn that you have recieved D r Byrd ’s journal on the survey of our Southern boundary , from mr Harrison of Barclay . it is a work I have wished to see, and if you think yourself at liberty, when done with it, to trust it in my hands for perusal only, it shall be promptly and safely returned by mail. if you do not feel entirely free to do this, I will write to request it of mr Harrison . I...
According to your request, I ruminated, as I journeyed here on your proposition for the establishment of an Agricultural Society . on my arrival here, I committed to writing what is in the inclo sed it will be a better proof of my willingness, than of my comp etence to be useful to the design. it is meant however but as a rough dra ught until it can re cieve the amendments of more skilful...
You observed yesterday in conversation that the Feds say I have given them every thing from Gr. Britain & little from France. but the reason is we have little from France, and much from England. From France I have communicated 1. Armstrong’s letter to Champagny & his answer avowing the extension of the Berlin decree to us. 2. Armstrong’s letter to him on the doctrine to that effect laid down...
Mr Isaac Briggs, of the adjoining state of Maryland, being desirous of employment in some part of the superintendance of the manufacturing company of Baltimore, has asked me to say what I know of him to yourself as a channel through which it may be conveyed to those on whom his emploiment may depend. he was the keeper of a school in this neighborhood with whom I became acquainted accidentally....
The inclosed paper was put into my hands by mr Madison to fill up some dates, but I have been so engaged as to do little to it; and supposing you will want it to-day I send it as it is. to that list may be added the appointment of Gouvr. Morris to negociate with the court of London , by letter written & signed by Genl. Washington, & Dav. Humphreys to negociate with Lisbon by letter....
I am anxious to recieve the British convention, because the moment I do, I shall lay it before both houses with a message for appropriation. for altho’ the next Congress might by possibility appropriate in time to make the first paiment, yet so great a remittance if pressed in time, might be made to great disadvantage. Great Britain too may want confidence in our ratification , if the...
Mr. P. Carr informed me two days ago that you wished for the dimensions of the Rumford fireplaces . I therefore avail myself of the first post to send them. I state them as I have used them myself, with great satisfaction, the back one half of the opening. Count Rumford makes the back but one third of the opening. this was to accomodate them to coal; but it renders them impracticable for wood....
A moment of leisure permits me to think of my friends. you will have seen an alarm in the newspapers on the subject of the Tripolitans & Algerines. the former about May was twelve month demanded a sum of money for keeping the peace, pretending that the sum paid as the price of the treaty was only for making peace. this demand was reiterated through the last year, but a promise made to Cathcart...
About the latter end of the last assembly I wrote to sollicit your endeavors to procure an act giving the character of citizens to Nicholas and Jacob Van Staphorst and Nicholas Hubbard merchants and bankers of Amsterdam. My letter got too late to your hands, and as you may not now have it with you I will state the subject again from the beginning. On the failure of the revolution attempted in...
Your favor of the 18th. is duly recieved. be assured that I value no act of friendship so highly as the communicating facts to me which I am not in the way of knowing otherwise, and could not therefore otherwise guard against. I have had too many proofs of your friendship not to be sensible of the kindness of these communications, and to recieve them with peculiar obligation. the reciept of mr...
I trouble you with another letter from Mr. D’Ivernois , containing a further development of his plan. Since you were here, I have found the inclosed rough draught of a subscription paper for clearing our river, which may explain to you the views and wishes of the subscribers. Nicholas and Jacob Van Staphorsts, wealthy bankers of Amsterdam, have for some time apprehended a storm in their...
Your favor of the 10th was recieved only the last night. I now return you the letter to Colo. Newton, which I will pray you to deliver & use your influence to induce an acceptance. it is in truth only asking him to become responsible for his son, which he would of course do were the office given to his son directly: & it will relieve me from a painful dilemma. shou’d he however refuse, be so...
Th: Jefferson presents his friendly salutations to Colo. Nicholas and incloses him the papers he desired some time ago. he really supposed mr Gallatin had forwarded them about the date of Th:J.’s letter to Colo. Nicholas, until he recieved them from mr G. yesterday. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I was in [hopes] we should have had the pleasure of seeing you here during the court, but I learn you were not at court yesterday. you once intimated to me a possibility that you might be able to spare me a superlative overseer which you had. I do not remember his name. this possibility seems to be strengthened by a late resolution (which your friends lament) of changing the form of your...
I wrote to the Secretary of State on the subject of mr Arm i stead , and have recieved his assurance that if there is a vacancy, or should be one in any of the departments, he will exert himself to procure it. I wrote to him of preference, because more intimate with him than with any other of the heads of departments, and for a reason still more interesting, which I will explain to you as I...
Reflecting on the proposition as to upper Louisiana which you mentioned as likely to unite all, and as it has been further explained by a map in the hands of mr Smith , I think it may be made to do. it is the better as it will sink the name of Louisiana, which might entertain hankerings on both sides the Atlantic. but something more energetic on that side the river must be provided than the...
Your kind sympathies in my late loss are a mark of your great friendship to me, and of the interest you are so good as to take in my happiness. it is indeed an inexpressible loss, and which, at my years, can hardly wear away. it is the more felt as it leaves, whatever of comfort remains, hanging on the slender thread of a single life. in the affections of our friends there is always great...
I thank you, Dear Sir, for your kind aid in my little money embarrasments. I found, on recieving mr Gibson ’s account that there were articles of debet not known to me to the amount of about 1000.D. more than I had proposed to provide for by my note for 2000.D. which render it necessary to enlarge it that much: and I avail myself with thankfulness of the kind offer of your name on the inclosed...
Retired to your farm and family I venture as a farmer and friend to ask your aid & counsel, in the helpless situation in which I am as to my own affairs. mr Lilly, my manager at Monticello has hitherto been on wages of £ 50. a year, and £ 10. additional for the nailing. he now writes me he cannot stay after the present year for less than £ 100. certainly I never can have a manager who better...
I wrote you a letter from Gordon’s on the 31st. of March, which having been on a particular subject , I am anxious to know that it has got safely to your hands. be so good as by return of post to say you have recieved it whenever you shall have recieved it.—nothing interesting from France. affectionate salutations. PrC ( MHi ); endorsed by TJ in ink on verso. TJ’s letter from gordon’s Tavern,...
Your favor of the 27 th is this moment recieved & I now inclose the notes it covered. On the subject of mr Brockenbrough the board of Visitors were very anxious to engage him, and certainly no one more so, nor with so much reason as myself. but there were two ingredients in his propositions , against one of which we were unanimous, and the other was disagreed to by a strong majority. the 1 st...
The more I have reflected on the phrase in the paper you shewed me , the more strongly I think it should be altered. suppose you were to instead of the invitation to cooperate in the annulment of the acts, to make it an invitation: ‘to concur with this commonwealth in declaring, as it does hereby declare, that the said acts are, and were ab initio—null, void and of no force, or effect’ I...
A considerable time ago I recieved from the Historical committee of the Philosophical society of Philada a letter informing me they were in possession of a MS. volume, which from their description I concluded must be a copy of Col o Byrd ’s journal of the Carolina boundary. it was on that occasion I asked the favor of you to procure me the reading that work. as they meant to print it, they
Just before I left Albemarle a proposition was started for establishing there a grammar school. You were so kind as to tell me you would write me the progress of the proposition: on my part I was to enquire for a tutor. To this I have not been inattentive. I enquired at Princetown of Dr. Witherspoon. But he informed me that that college was but just getting together again, and that no such...
The letter to mr Dandridge which you intrusted to me, I delivered the next morning to mr Hunter to be put into the post office at Concord , a mile from his house . he promised to do it the same day himself, and said the stage would take it on this day, and deliver it in Richmond on the 8 th which I trust will be done. certain that I shall not suffer in your hands, I administer to this...
I learnt yesterday from mr Gibson , with extreme regret that I had inadvertently let slip over the day of renewing my note in the farmer’s bank . how I became guilty of this inattention I cannot say, except from the pressure & hurry of business for many days on winding up there at Monticello , my journey to this place, and opening shop again here. I now inclose a note for renewal to mr Gibson...
Your favor of the 16 th I received yesterday your favor of the 16 th inst. informing me that the General assembly had been pleased to appoint me one of the Directors of the board of public works recently instituted by them. the spirit with which they have entered on the great works of improvement and public instruction will form an honorable epoch in the history of our country, and I sincerely...
I entirely approve of the confidence you have reposed in mr Brackenridge, as he possesses mine entirely. I had imagined it better those resolutions should have originated with N. Carolina. but perhaps the late changes in their representation may indicate some doubt whether they would have passed. in that case it is better they should come from Kentuckey. I understand you intend soon to go as...
I take the benefit of your cover to get a safe conveyance for the inclosed. a copy of the ratification by the first Consul, of our convention, is arrived. it is expressed to be with an ‘understanding always that the matters which were the subject of the suppressed article are abandoned on both sides.’ altho’ I consider this as a superfluous caution, nothing being more settled than that things...
A collector for the port of Hampton is wanting in the room of one Kirby removed for gross delinquency. Mount E. Chisman has been recommended. can you give me his character, & circumstances? can you recommend any body better, or advise me to any person whose judgment may be relied on to recommend, and who is acquainted with the characters of the neighborhood? I believe the case presses so that...
By the inclosed which I recieved last night, you will percieve that mr Chisman, Collector of Hampton is dead. the writer, mr Booker, who is unknown to me, recommends Robt. Armistead, also unknown. he says nothing of the politics of the candidate which generally authorises a presumption that they are not with the government. can you, from your present knolege, recommend a successor, and if not,...
I am detaining from the Philosophical society their copy of Col o Byrd ’s journal, until I can learn whether I may be permitted to send with it also the supplementary one of which I obtained the loan thro’ your favor. will you be so good as to favor me with the name of the person to whom it belongs, that I may sollicit the permission without troubling you? Does your new bank propose to do any...
You took the trouble of reading my former letters to mr Eppes on the subject of our finances, and I therefore inclose you a third letter to him on an important branch of the same subject, banks, for your perusal, if the volume does not appear too formidable. be so good as to stick a wafer into the letter and put it into the shortest post-line for Ça-ira which is his nearest post-office.— I...
Immediately on my arrival here I examined my papers & found that I had delivered up to the Treasury the copy of the judgment against Robinson’s administrators. I took the first opportunity therefore of speaking to mr Gallatin & desiring him to transmit it to you. he did not recollect the reciept of it, but promised to have it searched for. from him therefore you will recieve it. It seems now...
If I could refuse you any thing, it would be the request in your’s of the 9 th to submit to the operation of having my bust taken. of all operations it is the most revolting, whether you stand, as was Ciracchi ’s method, or lie down and have your face plaistered over with gypsum , as was Houdon ’s or sit as with the painters. I have no doubt of mr Coffee ’s talents from what you say of him;...