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I received yesterday only (altho’ in a letter of the 9 th ) notice from the bank of the US. that one of the notes endorsed by me would fall due the 20/23 inst. the other Oct. 17/20. instead of a renewal I have thought it better to execute at once a bond for both. I therefore inclose it to you as executed by Jefferson & myself & needing only your execution to enable me to inclose it to the bank...
Your favor of the 17 th came to hand yesterday, by which I percieve that mine of the 11 th and 17 th were still to be recieved, yours of the 17 th puts my mind perfectly at ease. I think with you it will be better to place the debt in the form of a bond, and will join you in one on my return. in the mean while I have sent on the notes to mr Marx, to give us time. for the 3 d name to the bond,...
My letters from Monticello informing me of the President’s return, I lost no time in bringing under his attention the wish of your son Robert to be placed in our new Southern territories, but unfortunately I had forgotten the particular office he had in view, and having left the letter at home could not have recourse to it. but I supplied the lapse of memory by taking the broader ground that...
Your letter of the 5 th finds me under the severst attack of rheumatism I have ever experienced. my limbs all swelled, their strength prostrate, & pain constant. but it fills me with affliction of another kind, very much on your account, and not small on my own. a call on me to the amount of my endorsements for you would indeed close my course by a catastrophe I had never contemplated. but the...
I learnt yesterday from mr Gibson, with extreme regret that I had inadvertently let slip over the day of renewing my note in the farmer’s bank. how I became guilty of this inattention I cannot say, except from the pressure & hurry of business for many days on winding up at Monticello , my journey to this place, and opening shop again here. I now inclose a note for renewal to mr Gibson, under...
I have desired mr Brockenbrough to ask your advice as be the best means of remitting to mr Hollins 840. D. on account of the University to meet bills and advances which his present situation would otherwise render inconvenient to him. our money being in Richmond, I hope some means may be found to remit it to him immediately. I will with pleasure write to mr Madison on the subject of the office...
Your favor of the 20 th is recieved, and the great accomodation at the Farmer’s bank warmly acknoleged; for without it I hardly know how I should have got along, and altho’ the additional 1000. D. from the US. bank will not be wanting longer than it’s term of payment and can be replaced with certainty before that from other funds, yet I find it necessary for draughts on mr Gibson which will...
I thank you, Dear Sir, for your kind aid in my little money embarrasments. I found, on recieving mr Gibson’s account that there were articles of debet not known to me to the amount of about 1000. D. more than I had proposed to provide for my note for 2000 D. which render it necessary to enlarge it that much: and I avail myself with thankfulness of the kind offer of your name on the inclosed...
Your favor of the 27 th is this moment recieved & I now inclose the notes it covered. On the subject of mr Brockenbrough the board of Visitors were very anxious to engage him, and certainly no one more so, nor with so much reason as myself. but there were two ingredients in his propositions, against one of which we were unanimous, and the other was disagreed to by a strong majority. the 1 st...
M r Brockenborough, as you describe him, is exactly such a character as we greatly need for our Procter; but I fear much that altho he would suit us our salary would not suit him. on this subject I have requested mr Garrett, who sets off to Richmond to-day, to consult with yourself & mr Cabell. Jefferson’s wounds are nearly healed; but I fear he will never recover much use of his arm. with...
Yours of the 25 th came to hand last night and I sincerely join with you in joy on the passage of the University bill . but it will be in a great measure on paper only with our present funds. the funds we transferred to the public , with what may be saved of the 1 st year’s endowment may enable us to build this year a 3 d and a 4 th pavilion so as to accomodate 4. professors; but after this...
The letter to mr Dandridge which you intrusted to me, I delivered the next morning to mr Hunter to be put into the post office at Concord , a mile from his house . he promised to do it the same day himself, and said the stage would take it on this day, and deliver it in Richmond on the 8 th which I trust will be done. certain that I shall not suffer in your hands, I administer to this...
I recieved at this place, and yesterday only your favor of the 19 th . if it has not loitered on the road, it mus t have been at Lynchburg with which I have but uncertain communications. were a hesitation possible at the request it contains, it would proceed only from the wish to leave at the close of life as clear a state of things as possible for those who are to come after me; to be able,...
Your favor of Mar. 30. is at hand, and I so far avail myself of your friendship as to inclose you a note for 3000.D. meaning to trouble you only with the first negociation, as the renewals shall be attended to thro mr Gibson hereafter. I can by no means consent to your name being put on it, because in the place you are such a practice would overwhelm you with embarrasments. Jefferson is my...
An old balance of account between the bankers of the US. in Amsterdam and myself, believed by us both to have arisen from mistakes in the complicated matters of account of the US which, without being an Accountant, I had to direct, and to give draughts for in behalf of the various cr descriptions of public creditors, was left, under this persuasion by them & myself for further enquiry. in this...
If I could refuse you any thing, it would be the request in your’s of the 9 th to submit to the operation of having my bust taken. of all operations it is the most revolting, whether you stand, as was Ciracchi ’s method, or lie down and have your face plaistered over with gypsum , as was Houdon ’s or sit as with the painters. I have no doubt of mr Coffee ’s talents from what you say of him;...
I am detaining from the Philosophical society their copy of Col o Byrd ’s journal, until I can learn whether I may be permitted to send with it also the supplementary one of which I obtained the loan thro’ your favor. will you be so good as to favor me with the name of the person to whom it belongs, that I may sollicit the permission without troubling you? Does your new bank propose to do any...
A considerable time ago I recieved from the Historical committee of the Philosophical society of Philada a letter informing me they were in possession of a MS. volume, which from their description I concluded must be a copy of Col o Byrd ’s journal of the Carolina boundary. it was on that occasion I asked the favor of you to procure me the reading that work. as they meant to print it, they
I had made up a decision on the case of your Nephew, previous to the rect. of your favor of the 23d. Ult: and with every disposition to respect the considerations which it suggests. The course which occurred as best calculated to reconcile all proper considerations was that of disapproving the sentence of the Court, so as to restore Col: N. to his Stand in the army, and of declining the usual...
I wrote to the Secretary of State on the subject of mr Arm i stead , and have recieved his assurance that if there is a vacancy, or should be one in any of the departments, he will exert himself to procure it. I wrote to him of preference, because more intimate with him than with any other of the heads of departments, and for a reason still more interesting, which I will explain to you as I...
I have duly recd. your letter of the 18th. inclosing a commission for me as one of the Visitors of the Central College in Albemarle. With a reservation of the time required by my remaining duties at this place, I shall with pleasure contribute my services in promoting the welfare of so beneficial an Institution. Accept my esteem & respect Vi .
I learn that you have recieved D r Byrd ’s journal on the survey of our Southern boundary , from mr Harrison of Barclay . it is a work I have wished to see, and if you think yourself at liberty, when done with it, to trust it in my hands for perusal only, it shall be promptly and safely returned by mail. if you do not feel entirely free to do this, I will write to request it of mr Harrison . I...
I am very happy in any opportunity of endeavorin g to be useful to one of mrs Norton ’s family, with whom I had great intimacy at that period of life when impressions are strongest & longest retained. I fear however that a birth in the offices at Washington will be uncertain. they are rarely vacated but by death. I have written however to the two heads of departments with whom I am more at...
I have recd yours of the 30th. ult: It will afford me pleasure to promote your wishes on behalf of Mr. Armistead; and the pleasure will be increased by my recollections of the period & persons to whom you allude. It is incumbent on me at the same time to remark that it is the usage, to leave to the heads of Depts. the selection of their own Clks. which the law vests in their discretion &...
I omitted to forward the inclosed. I know nothing of the writer but from the letter itself; and send it merely that you may have an oppy. of judging whether it be worth your further inquiry thro’ Mr. Adams. Accept my best respects Vi .
I duly received your letter of March 4. inclosing a Resolution of Feby. 22. by the General Assembly of Virginia; and urging the importance of providing for the protection of the Chesapeake Bay, which is the object of that Resolution. Concurring fully in the views you have presented of the extended interests which are connected with the Waters of the Bay, and of the use that can be made of them...
I have recd. yours of the 28. Apl. I have always regarded Mr. Latrobe as the first Architect in our Country, and particularly distinguished by his uniting with science & taste, a practical acquaintance with the minutest details of the art. He is considered as also well skilled in what belongs to the profession of a Civil Engineer, and of course with what relates to the improvements under your...
On the receipt of your letter, I made enquiry of Mr. Latrobe concerning the young French Engineer to whom Commodore Decatur referred; and found that he had returned to France. He is the Mr. Surville named in the inclosed communication from Mr. Latrobe . This paper grew out of the conversation I had with him on the occasion; and will I hope aid your efforts in carrying advantagiously into...
In my letter of the 2 d inst. I stated, according to your request what occurred to me on the subjects of Defence and Education; and I will now proceed to do the same on the remaining subject of your’s of Mar. 22. the construction of a general map of the state. for this the legislature directs that there shall be I. a topographical survey of each county. II. a General survey of the Outlines of...
The inclosed has just been handed to me from Mr. Latrobe. You will say to him what you think proper on the subject. Accept my esteem & friendly respects Vi .
Your favor of Mar. 22. has been recieved. it finds me more laboriously, and imperiously engaged than almost on any occasion of my life. it is not therefore in my power to take into immediate consideration all the subjects it proposes. they cover a broad surface, & will require some developement. they respect I. Defence. II. Education. III. the Map of the state. this last will comprise 1. an...
Your favor of the 16 th I received yesterday your favor of the 16 th inst. informing me that the General assembly had been pleased to appoint me one of the Directors of the board of public works recently instituted by them. the spirit with which they have entered on the great works of improvement and public instruction will form an honorable epoch in the history of our country, and I sincerely...
As the outer letter may be to go into different hands I place in a separate one my thanks for your kind offer of the comfortable quarters of your house in the event of my acting as a Director of the public works. but at the age of 73. volunteer journies are out of the question. those to Bedford are of necessity. for them however I chuse my own time, am there with one or two nights only...
I duly recieved your two favors of the 3. & 6 th . I was engaged in the moment in preparing some necessary orders before my departure to see my brother , and could not therefore immediately answer them. the circumstances respecting Appleton , and my particular d connection with them I knew must be unknown to you & of course could not be under your view in asking my interference. I do not yet...
I have recd yours of the 28th. Ult. The wishes of your son & of yourself, that he might be appd. to the Consulate at Leghorn had been previously made known to me; and I should have taken sincere pleasure in doing what depends on me for giving effect to them, had the way been sufficiently open; being well persuaded that your son merits all the confidence which is claimed for him. Mr. Appleton...
Your favor of yesterday is this moment recieved and furnishes me matter of real regret: because there is nothing just & honorable which I would not cheerfully do for yourself or any member of your family. but the case in question stands thus. while I lived in Paris , I became acquainted with Thomas Appleton of Boston , then a young man, and recommended him to the old Congress as Consul for...
I did not receive your favor of the 11th. instant till a few days ago; and I have till now been too much indisposed to acknowlege it. You are not mistaken in viewing the conduct of the Eastern States as the source of our greatest difficulties in carrying on the war; as it certainly is the greatest, if not the sole inducement with the Enemy to persevere in it. The greater part of the people in...
You took the trouble of reading my former letters to mr Eppes on the subject of our finances, and I therefore inclose you a third letter to him on an important branch of the same subject, banks, for your perusal, if the volume does not appear too formidable. be so good as to stick a wafer into the letter and put it into the shortest post-line for Ça-ira which is his nearest post-office.— I...
According to your request, I ruminated, as I journeyed here on your proposition for the establishment of an Agricultural Society . on my arrival here, I committed to writing what is in the inclo sed it will be a better proof of my willingness, than of my comp etence to be useful to the design. it is meant however but as a rough dra ught until it can re cieve the amendments of more skilful...
On enquiry of mr Randolph I find his process for rolling his seed corn in plaister varies a little from what I told you. he first dilutes the tar with water stirred into it to such a consistency as will make the plaister adhere. corn is then put into a trough & diluted tar poured on it & stirred till the whole of the grains are perfectly coated. there must be no surplus of the tar more than...
I now inclose you the Agricultural catalogue . I do not know whether I have made it more or less comprehensive than you wished. but in either case you can make it what it should be by reduction or addition. there are probably other good books with which I am unacquainted. I do not possess the Geoponica, nor Rozier’s dictionary. all the others I have & set them down on my own knolege, except...
I did not know, till mr Patterson called on us, a few days ago, that you had passed on to Washington . I had recently observed in the debates of Congress , a matter introduced, on which I wished to give explanations more fully in conversation which I will now do by abridgment in writing. mr Randolph has proposed an enquiry into certain prosecutions at Common law in Connecticut , for libels on...
I am sorry to hear of your attack of rheumatism both on your own account & that of the public, & as I think you will have to go on as soon as you are able. I believe that immediately on the pacification with England , a vessel was dispatched to France for the Ultimatum of that government as I presume. Turreau was earnest in giving assurances that Napoleon would revoke his decrees, considering...
That the President ought to be authorized, in case either of the France or G. Britain shall so revoke or modify her Edicts as that they shall cease to violate the neutral Commerce of the U. S. to declare, by Proclamation a reasonable day, after which the trade of the U. S. suspended by the several Embargo laws, shall be resumed with the said nation: so doing and to cause to be issued, under...
The idea I meant to express yesterday was "to repeal the embargo no matter how soon, as to all countries except G. B. & France, and to add a Non-intercourse at as short a day as may be consistent with notice &c as to them only," and to arm or not in defence of the trade so to be authorized, as the sense of Congs. might be found to require; preferring however, under present impressions, the not...
I always consider it as the most friendly office which can be rendered me, to be informed of any thing which is going amiss, and which I can remedy. I had known that there had been a very blameable failure in the cloathing department, which had not become known so as to be remedied, till the beginning of October. but I had believed that the remedy had then been applied with as much diligence...
Your favor of the 18th. is duly recieved. be assured that I value no act of friendship so highly as the communicating facts to me which I am not in the way of knowing otherwise, and could not therefore otherwise guard against. I have had too many proofs of your friendship not to be sensible of the kindness of these communications, and to recieve them with peculiar obligation. the reciept of mr...
Th: Jefferson: presents his friendly salutations to mr Nicholas and incloses him a check on the bank of the US. for 300 Dollars, by direction of Burgess Griffin to whose credit mr Nicholas will be pleased to place it. ViU .
You observed yesterday in conversation that the Feds say I have given them every thing from Gr. Britain & little from France. but the reason is we have little from France, and much from England. From France I have communicated 1. Armstrong’s letter to Champagny & his answer avowing the extension of the Berlin decree to us. 2. Armstrong’s letter to him on the doctrine to that effect laid down...
Mr Isaac Briggs, of the adjoining state of Maryland, being desirous of employment in some part of the superintendance of the manufacturing company of Baltimore, has asked me to say what I know of him to yourself as a channel through which it may be conveyed to those on whom his emploiment may depend. he was the keeper of a school in this neighborhood with whom I became acquainted accidentally....