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ALS : University of Pennsylvania Library Understanding since I came hither that 4 Waggon Loads of Gunpowder for New York, which had been landed at the Neversinks, pass’d thro’ here last Friday, I have dispatch’d an Order to our Waggoner, whom I pass’d yesterday at Trenton, to return back with the Ton we spar’d, since it will not be wanted at New York, and may be wanted with us. I hope our...
AL : Library of Congress Mr. Franklin presents his Compliments to Mr. Morris, and not knowing what was done by the Committee with regard to the other Prisoners, requests Mr. Morris would direct what is to be done with these. Addressed: To / Robt Morris Esqr BF penciled this note at the bottom of the preceding one, then crossed out his own name on the address and penciled in Morris’. By now BF...
I received your favors of the 11 & 16 Instts the former respecting powder for which you have Inclosed the Commissarys receipts as to the Number of Barrells but not of the Contents, no Invoice thereof having been delivered either to me or him, which certainly shoud have been sent for the detection of any fraudulent practices, if any were committed—The Commissary will expect one, & that they...
ALS : (duplicate): Library of Congress This letter, in form to Morris but in fact to the committee, is the only one from Deane that Franklin surely saw before his departure for France; it was therefore part of his small stock of information about what would face him in Europe. The letter deals only with the preliminaries of Deane’s mission, because he reached France long after he had hoped to....
I have been honored with your favr of the 7th Inst. upon the Subject of Tents for this Army. That you might receive proper Information of the Number wanted, I directed the Quarter Master General to return you an Estimate, whose Office it is to provide them. His Report you will find in the inclosed Letter which I beg leave to refer you, and requesting that the greatest Dispatch may be used in...
When M r . Deane went to France I communicated to him a Mode of invisible writing unknown to any but the Inventor and myself. The inclosed Letter will explain it—On opening his Letter to me Yesterday & finding one directed to you inclosed in it, I without thought gave it to a Gentleman of your Light Horse who had been to Ticonderoga with Money from the Congress, I dont recollect his Name—I had...
The enclosed is a Copy of the late invisible Parts of M r . Dean’s Letters. You will perceive some Blanks in it. M r . D. it seems did not write with his usual Care and Accuracy—There are many Blots in one of the Letters, and in one or two other Instances the Lines cross and run into one another—Little material is however illegible. I am happy to find our Affairs wear so pleasing an Aspect in...
The late unfortunate Miscarriage of General Washingtons Letters to the Congress makes me anxious about the Fate of a Letter I wrote you the 6 th Ult o . inclosing Copies of two I had rec d . from M r . Dean. My Letter was sent to Head Quarters to go with the Generals Dispatches. Be so kind as to inform me whether you ever rec d . it. I am Dear Sir Your most ob t . Serv t P.S. Coll Williams...
Your Letter to M r . Duane relieved me from much Anxiety. The miscarriage of the Generals Letter made me feel for the Fate of those I transmitted thro’ him to You. If I believed you suspected my Sincerity, I should for the first Time in my Life be displeased with you, but I assure you I entertain no such unfriendly Ideas. every Chair in the Congress Room will acquit me of the Charge of...
I have before me your favor of yesterday, and for answer would inform you, that I shall most chearfully cooperate with you in endeavoring to save the Frigate Delaware, and for this purpose shall immediately inclose your Letter to Colo. Cadwallader, with directions for Capt. Alexander, with his Officers and a sufficient number of men to proceed to Phila. without delay in order to carry the...
Your favour of yesterday came duely to hand, and I thank you for the several agreeable Articles of Intelligence therein contain’d. for godsake hurry Mr Mease with the Cloathing as nothing will contribute more to facilitate the recruiting Service than warm & comfortable Cloathing to those who engage. Muskets are not wanted at this place, nor should they, or any other valuable Stores (in my...
I have your obliging favors of the 21st and 23d the Blankets are come to hand, but I would not have any of the other Goods sent on, till you hear again from me. I agree with you, that it is in vain to ruminate upon, or even reflect upon the Authors or Causes of our present Misfortunes, we should rather exert ourselves, and look forward with Hopes, that some lucky Chance may yet turn up in our...
I this minute received the honor of your favor of the 26th, and you may be assured that I shall with great pleasure transmit all my dispatches to Congress through your hands and unsealed. The inclosed to them will give you a full account of the attack on Trenton and to which I beg leave to refer you. I regret much, that the Ice prevented Col. Cadwalader from passing. could he have got over...
The inclosed Letter to Congress will shew you my intention of passing the River again & the Plans I have in view. After you have perused it, I beg your care of it & that it may be closed & transmitted ’em by the earliest Opportunity. I am Dear Sir with sentiments of great regard Yr Most Obed. St P.S. I shall be particularly obliged ⟨for⟩ your care of the Two other ⟨L⟩etters inclosed. That for...
We have the greatest Occasion at present for hard Money, to pay a certain set of People who are of particular use to us. If you could possibly collect a Sum, if it were but One hundred or one hundred and fifty Pounds it would be of great Service. Silver would be most convenient. I am taking every Measure to improve our late lucky Blow, and hope to be successful; the greatest impediment to our...
Our Affairs are at present in a most delicate—tho’ I hope a fortunate Situation: But the great & radical Evil which pervades our whole System & like an Ax at the Tree of our Safety Interest & Liberty here again shews its baleful Influence—Tomorrow the Continental Troops are all at Liberty—I wish to push our Success to keep up the Pannick & in order to get their Assistance have promised them a...
The Inclosed coming to you open, leaves nothing for me to add on the score of Information of our Circumstances & Situation —A Report (and such only I give it) is just brot that the Enemy are evacuating Brunswick, and moving forward towards Amboy or Woodbridge. Your sending the Inclosed for Mrs Washington to the Post Office (if in time for the Southern Mail) will much oblige Dr Sir, Yr Most...
If a midst a multiplicity of Important matters, you could suffer a trivial one to Intrude, I should thank you most heartily, for taking a Letter or two of mine, when you do your own, by the Southern Mail, and forwarding of them, as oppertunity offers, to the Camp. I have long since drop’d all private corrispondance with my friends in Virginia, finding it incompatable with my public business—A...
Your favor of the 14th, with the despatches from Congress, came safe to hand, and those for the eastward forwarded on. I am thankful to you for the information of Captn Bell. Intelligence of the same nature had come to me before, and I had no doubt (if the diversion intended to be made by Genl Heath towards New York, does not withdraw from the Jerseys, or detain part of the Troops said to be...
If some very effectual Measures are not fallen upon to recover the Arms and Accoutrements that are put into the Hands of the Militia after they return home; we shall be put to the greatest difficulty to arm the regular Regiments as they are raised. I therefore beg that the Council of Safety or whoever has the delivery of the Arms would be very particular in taking Receipts from the Colonels or...
I have yours of the 31st ulto and can readily excuse your not answering my letters with regularity, as I know the weight of important Business that lays upon your hands. The Return of Stores made by Mr Towers is so small that I do not think the immediate removal of them any ways necessary. Besides they are such as will be cheifly taken up by the Troops upon their march. If there are any bulky...
I shall thank you for yr Care of the Inclosed. nothing of consequence since my last to Congress —frequent Skirmishes happen between the Enemys foraging Parties & our Scouts; but they come out so strong now, we can make nothing of this. Most sincerely I am Yrs ALS , NjMoHP . The enclosure has not been identified. GW is referring to his letter to Hancock of 5 Feb. 1777 .
You are well acquainted with my Opinion, upon the inexpediency of keeping any more Stores in the City of philadelphia, than are absolutely necessary for the equipment of the new Levies. I am at this time particularly anxious to have them removed. The Enemy have lately been considerably reinforced in Jersey and, from a variety of Accounts are meditating some Blow. I am firmly persuaded that...
Your favour of the 27th Ulto came to my hands last night—the freedom with which you have communicated your Sentiments on several matters therein contained is highly pleasing to me, for be assured Sir, that nothing would add more to my satisfaction than an unreserved Corrispondance with a Gentleman, of whose abilities and attachment to the Cause we are contending to support, I entertain so high...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] April 12, 1777. States objections to forming an army in Pennsylvania. Names Bristol as rendezvous. Orders Pennsylvania Militia to be kept at a distance from Continental troops until there is action. Again recommends removal of stores from Philadelphia. LS , in writing of H, New-York Historical Society, New York City. Df , in writing of Tench Tilghman with minor...
Your favour by Monsieur Armandt was duly handed me. I have been happy to show him every mark of attention in my power. The considerations you mention gave him a just claim to it; and derived additional weight from your recommendation. I am pleased to find Congress took such distinguishing notice of him as they did in their late appointment. He has requested to have the command of a partisan...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] May 28, 1777. Encloses a letter from Major General Charles Lee. States that he (Washington) is on his way to Bound Brook. LS , in writing of H, George Washington Photostats, Library of Congress. Morris was a member of the Committee of Foreign Affairs of the Continental Congress. Lee was a prisoner of the British.
I transmit you the inclosed from General Lee which I have just received by a flag. The other inclosures, I beg may be immediately handed to the Gentlemen for whom they are. As I am this moment going off to the Camp at Boundbrook, I have only time to add, that I am with sentiments of real regard & respect, Sir Your most Obedient servant LS (photocopy), in Alexander Hamilton’s writing, NjP :...
Inclosed you have a letter for Major Apollos Morris which I have left open for your inspection, after reading it, be pleased to deliver it. I will just remark, that the political Queries referred to were addressed to Lord and Sir William Howe, and Major Morris declared that if they refused to give him an answer he should look upon it as a tacit Confession that they had no other terms or poers...
In looking over my private Acct with the Public, I find a credit to it of a blank number of Silver Dollars sent me by you whilst I lay at Trentown about the first of Jany. for want of the Sum, I cannot Balle the Acct, and shall thank you for information on this head. With sincere regard I am Dr Sir Yr Most Obedt & Affe Servt ALS , PWacD , on deposit (1994) at PPAmP . An entry for this money,...
M r . Deane in a Letter of the 28 May last, after recommending an attack on the Greenland Fishery & Hudsons Bay Trade, desired me to communicate the following Plan to Congress viz t . “To send three Frigates loaded with Tobacco to Nantz or Bordeaux, equipped in the best Manner and on their arrival hide the chief of their Guns and appear as Cruzers. Intelligence may be had every week what the...
AL : Yale University Library I remember that long before I was ordered here, you once did me the Honour to say, you should not dislike being sent to France with me. Since my being here, I have frequently wish’d that Appointment had taken place. I think I should have pass’d my time more comfortably. We are now five of us in this City, all honest and capable Men (if I may include myself in that...
About a Fortnight ago I rec d . three Letters from France, one dated at Dunkirk the 2 d June, another at Passy near Paris the 8 th . June, and the third at Havre the 10 th . June, 1777— All of the same Import & nearly in the same words; an exact Copy of the first is enclosed for the Committee. I should have immediately on the Rec t . of them have sent you Copies, but the necessary Materials...
Your favor of the 19th Ulto by Colo. Armand came to my hands a few days ago. rest assured my good Sir, that that Gentn mis-conceives the matter exceedingly if he thinks my conduct towards him is influenced in the smallest degree by motives of resentment, arising from misrepresentn. I have ever looked upon him as a spirited Officer, and every thing that was in my power to do for him...
I have your favr of the 22d instant. I take the hint in the freindly light in which it was meant, and thank you for your attention to a matter of the utmost importance. I shall write to the Board of War, and, without mentioning names, let them know that there is not that activity and exertion in the Conductors of our Elaboratories, that the advanced season demands. Some allowance must be made,...
Your favor of the 9th Instt informed me of the acceptable present which your friend Mr Governeur (of Curracoa) was pleased to intend for me, and for which he will, through you, accept my sincere thanks—these are also due to you my good Sir, for the kind communication of the matter, and for the trouble you have had in ordering the wine forward. I rejoice most sincerely with you, on the glorious...
Mrs Washington and I, will wait on you and Mrs Morris at dinner, on Monday next, with great pleasure. If in pursuing the bent of my own inclination, I was happy enough to pay such attention as was pleasing to you at Valley forge, it was more than the time or the place gave me any reason to hope; and the favourable light in which they are mentioned by you cannot but be pleasing to—Dr Sir Yr...
When Characters rendered amiable by virtues & important by talents, are exposed to Suspicions & become Subjects of Investigation, the Sensibility of Individuals, as well as the Interest of the Public are concerned in the Event of the Enquiry— It gives me particular pleasure therefore to transmit to transmit to you an unanimous Act of Congress of the 11 th : Inst.—not only acquitting your...
Incomplete copy: Library of Congress of mine, M. de la Freté has some Business of Importance to be transacted for him in America. I have taken the Liberty of naming You to him as a Person in whose Abilities & Integrity he may confide for the transacting of it & I recommend it warmly to your best Attention. M. Gerard will communicate to you the Particulars. I am ever, with the sincerest Esteem...
LS : Boston Public Library; AL (draft) and copy: Library of Congress The Chevalier de la Luzerne, who goes over to succeed M. Gerard, will I hope have the Pleasure of delivering this into your hand, and of being by that means introduced to your Acquaintance. He has a most amiable Character here, and I am persuaded will make himself very acceptable to our People, as he has the most sincere Good...
LS : Yale University Library; copy: Library of Congress My Friend, M. De la Freté, having a considerable Property in the Hands of M. De Rouillac & Co. at Edenton in N. Carolina has sent a Power of attorney to M. Holker to recover the same for him. If you can in any way assist M. Holker in effecting this Business, you will very much oblige Dear Sir, Your most obedient & most humble Servant....
I have received, & I thank you, for your favor of the 1st Instt. Almost at the same instant of its arrival a letter from Messrs Hewes Smith & Allan was put into my hands giving an acct of the safe arrival of the Wine (mentioned by you) at Edenton; & of their having confided it to the care of Mr Turnbull (at his own earnest request) to be conveyed to me. Should it arrive in good order I shall...
AL (draft): Library of Congress The Bearer M. Billion des Gayeres goes to America in some Employ relative to the Provision for the Subsistance of the French Troops. His Friends have requested of me a Letter of Introduction to some Friend of mine in Philadelphia. As I know of no one so well acquainted with, & so capable of advising in such Affairs as yourself, I take the Liberty of recommending...
LS : Mrs. Henry Sage, Albany, New York (1958); copy: Library of Congress I received your kind Letter of March 31. acquainting me with your having engaged in M. De la Frétés Affairs on my Recommendation. I thank you very much; and beg you to be assured, that any Recommendation of yours will be regarded by me with the greatest Attention. The Letter you inclosed to M. Dumas is forwarded to him....
I am honored with your favor of the 3d and have received—in good order—the pipe of Spirits you were pleased to present me with. for both permit me to offer my grateful thanks, and to assure you that, the value of the latter was greatly enhanced by the flattering sentiments contained in the former. In a struggle like ours—perplexed with embarrassments—if it should be my fortune to conduct the...
Had I been ever so much disposed to be out of Humour with the Silence of my Friends I assure you it would all have given Way to the Pleasure with which I rec d . your Letter of the 6th July— Perhaps an opportunity may yet offer for settling a Cypher— I shall attempt it within this Month in a Way I think will succeed. M rs . Jay has more Health than she has enjoyed this long time—she is now at...
I am happy to inform you, that the business to which I am indebted for your favor of the 28th Ulto, was effected previous to the receipt of your letter. Mr Elliot had applied thro’ Mr Izard, for Captn Mure’s parole, which was immediately granted, and orders given to the Commissary of Prisoners to signify the same to him. I make no doubt therefore, but that he is, by this time, either in New...
As I have lately written by different vessels to Congress, and my Friends, among whom I always reckon you. My chief Inducement at present is to commit the inclosed to your Care and to request the Favor of you to forward them. No Letters from America of later date than July have reached me, indeed I have had the Pleasure of receiving only one from you since we parted. Some were probably carried...
I was among the first who were convinced, that an administration by single men was essential to the proper management of the affairs of this country. I am persuaded now it is the only resource we have to extricate ourselves from the distresses, which threaten the subversion of our cause. It is palpable that the people have lost all confidence in our public councils, and it is a fact of which I...
I had the pleasure of receiving your favor of the 16th of April a few days ago by Docr Craick. As I did not conceive that General Robertson would derive any dangerous acquisition of power from the possession of his Commission, I sent it to him yesterday—acts of Civility of this nature, as you rightly observe, lead to an interchange of good offices, which are often found necessary and...