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    • Washington, George
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    • Morris, Robert
    • Morris, Robert

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Morris, Robert" AND Recipient="Morris, Robert"
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Enclosed is your Warrant on Mr Hilligas, endorsed—I thank you for the trouble you have taken to negotiate the matter with Govr Clinton, & have the honor to be with all possible regard, Dr Sir Your Most obedt & affecte Servant LB , DLC:GW . See GW to Morris, 4 Jan., n.1 , George Clinton to GW, 27 Feb. , and James Milligan to GW, 9 Mar., n.3 . Michael Hillegas (1729–1804) was United States...
A brother of mine (Father to Mr Bushrod Washington, who studied Law under Mr Wilson) is desireous of entering his other Son in the commercial line; the inclination of the young Gentleman also points to this walk of life—he is turned of twenty—has just finished a regular education—possesses, I am told (for he is a stranger to me) good natural abilities—an amiable disposition, & an uncommon...
Your favor of the 15th did not reach my hands ’till the 27th. I will delay no time in communicating the contents of Mr Constable’s letter to my brother; but as he lives at the distance of near an hundred miles from me, & out of the Post road, it may be some time before I can obtain his answer. This being the case, as it may be some disadvantage to Mr Constable to be held in suspence—& as the...
I have been favored with your letter of the first of last month, by Doctr Gilpin & Mr Scott—Mr Colby, they informed me remained indisposed at Baltimore—It will always give me pleasure to see any Gentleman of your introduction—No apology therefore need ever accompany it. Having begun a letter to you, I will take the liberty of suggesting a matter for your consideration; which, if it strikes...
I give you the trouble of this letter at the instance of Mr Dalby of Alexandria; who is called to Philadelphia to attend what he conceives to be a vexatious law-suit respecting a slave of his, which a Society of Quakers in the City (formed for such purposes) have attempted to liberate. The merits of this case will no doubt appear upon trial; but from Mr Dalby’s state of the matter, it should...
When your favor of the 23d Ult. was sent here from the Post Office, I was at Fredericksburg (to which place I had been called, suddenly, by Express) to bid, as I was prepared to expect, the last adieu to an honoured parent, and an affectionate Sister whose watchful attention to my Mother during her illness had brought to deaths door. The latter I hope is now out of danger, but the former...
By the charming Polly Capt. Ellwood I forward you a perfect model of the plough which was sent to me by Mr Young with the direction of that Gentleman for setting it for use, from the character I have received of its performance surpasses any that has ever been tried before, on my Farms. I also send you a part of the summer wheat with which Mr Young has furnished me as springing from seed sent...
Letter not found: to Robert Morris, 14 Oct. 1787. On 25 Oct. Morris acknowledged “the receipt of your obliging letter of the 14th Inst.”
Permit me to assure you in unequivocal terms, that the proposed visit of Mrs Morris, and such parts of your family as are mentioned in your letter of the 29th Ulto will give sincere pleasure at Mount Vernon—Mrs Washington and myself only wish that you had not confined it to Miss, and the two Mr Morris—of this I have taken the liberty to inform Mrs Morris in a letter; hoping that she may find...
I pray you to receive my thanks for your favor of the 5th and for the obliging attention which you have given to the Flour matting from China. The latter is not yet arrived at the Port of Alexandria nor is the navigation of the River at this time open for the Passage of any Vessel—while the frost has much the appearance of encreasing and continuing. In every wish that can contribute to the...
The President and Mrs W——Compliments and thanks to Mr Morris for his politeness. They have nothing to charge Mr Morris with but their affectionate regards for Mrs Morris and the family; and to wish him a pleasanter journey than the state of the Roads promise, and a safe return to this City when his business in Philadelphia shall be accomplished. AL , PWacD : Sol Feinstone Collection, on...
Major Jackson having communicated the result of his conversation with you to General Stewart, the General was so obliging as to write the enclosed letter on the subject of giving you possession —and I was induced by his determination to give Mr Lear some directions relative to the removal of the furniture from New York. But that no unnecessary delay may be sustained in completing the repairs...
Your letter of the 21th of April was not received until yesterday morning — none of later date than the 15th of that month overtook me on the road to Savannah, and orders were dispatched for all to be returned to this place after I left the post-road—This will account for the late reception of yours. The very favorable character given of Mr Wolcott before his appointment to the office of...
This letter will be presented to you by Mr Jno. Augo. Spotswood, Son of General Spotswood. The enclosure, communicates the ideas of the father, and the wishes of the Son as fully as it is in my power to make them known to you; and when compared with the former letters from Genl Spotswood to me, which you have seen, leaves nothing more for me to add on this subject than to say that your good...
The enclosed is, at Mr Powells request, returned to you; with my thanks for the perusal. I take the liberty (and for the reason therein mentioned) to lay before you General Spotswoods letter to me respecting his Son—assuring you at the sametime that it is for the sole purpose of complying with his request it is done—& not that I wish, in the smallest degree to urge the request further than it...
As I have other unproductive landed property in the Western Country besides that which you seem disposed to become the purchaser of—and some also in Virginia, which, in my opinion, promises the richest future harvest of anything of the kind I have contemplated. I offer the whole to you upon the terms mentioned in the enclosed paper. Were my prospects different from what they really are, not...
If any land, of which I am possessed on the Ohio River, is thought an eligable site for a town; and those who wish to see one established thereon, and, at the sametime, are disposed to promote the measure; will come forward with some digested plan, in writing, for my consideration, no unfounded objections will, I am persuaded, be made on my part. I take the liberty of making this communication...
The motives which give birth to this letter, proceed as much from private friendship, as they do from a sense of public duty; whatever therefore may be the effect produced by it I presume on your excuse for the trouble it will give you. The letter herewith enclosed from Mr Scott (one of the Commissioners of the Fedl City) was met by me on my way to George Town, with another from Colo. Deakins...
I can add nothing, in support of the extract on the other side, that was not contained in a former letter from me to you; on the same subject. But I would thank you for letting me know what answer I shall return to the Commissioners of the Federal city. Their credit, I know, has been stretched to its utmost limits, in order to keep the wheels moving; even in the slow, and unprofitable manner...
Your favour of the 8th Instt was received the 16th, and the purport of it shall be communicated to the Secretary of War by ⟨the⟩ Mail of tomorrow. In what state the organization of the artillery & Infantry Corps are, under the late acts of Congress, I know not. Not I fear in the forwardness they ought to be, to prepare, & fit them for the active Service they may have to encounter. It is with...
I am happy to inform you, that the business to which I am indebted for your favor of the 28th Ulto, was effected previous to the receipt of your letter. Mr Elliot had applied thro’ Mr Izard, for Captn Mure’s parole, which was immediately granted, and orders given to the Commissary of Prisoners to signify the same to him. I make no doubt therefore, but that he is, by this time, either in New...
I had the pleasure of receiving your favor of the 16th of April a few days ago by Docr Craick. As I did not conceive that General Robertson would derive any dangerous acquisition of power from the possession of his Commission, I sent it to him yesterday—acts of Civility of this nature, as you rightly observe, lead to an interchange of good offices, which are often found necessary and...
The present conveyance is sudden & unexpected. I have only time therefore to acknowledge the receipt of your favors of the 29th Ulto and to assure you, that I felt a most sensible pleasure, when I heard of your acceptance of the late appointment of Congress to regulate the Finances of this Country—My hand & heart shall be with you, and as far as my assistance will, or can go, command it. We...
I have recd your favors of the 15th and 21st. Your opinion of the absolute necessity of a repeal of all tender laws, before a new species of paper, tho’ upon even so good an establishment, will gain credit with the public, is certainly founded upon reason and justified by experience. I am in hopes that most if not all the Legislatures have at length seen the fatal effects of those laws and...
In consequence of a request from me to Mr Lowrey, that he would continue to purchase and forward Flour to the utmost extent of his Commission, he informs me that he has compleated the purchase of 2000 Barrels and that he has began upon that of 1000 more; but of this he desires me to give you notice; meaning I suppose that you may put a stop to it, if it should not meet your approbation. I have...
your favors of the 2d and 5th Instants have afforded me infinite satisfaction, as the measures you are pursuing for subsisting the Army perfectly accord with my Ideas, and are, I am certain, the only ones which can secure us from distress or the constant apprehensions of it. Had magazines of any consequence been formed in the different States, in pursuance of the late requisitions of Congress,...
I have been honored with yours of the 23d ulto. I take the earliest opportunity of informing you that our whole dependence for Flour is upon you. The State of New York it is said has a considerable quantity yet within it, but so exhausted are the resources of the Legislature that they can command none of it. New Jersey has not either passed laws to draw forth the specific supplies demanded of...
The expectation of the pleasure of seeing you has prevented me hitherto from making a communication of a most important and interesting nature—But circumstances will not admit of further delay, and I must trust it to paper. It seems reduced almost to a certainty, that the enemy will reinforce New York with part of their troops from Virginia—In that case the attempt against the former must be...
There are 311 Barrels of Salt Beef at Portsmouth in New Hampshire, which, to save land Carriage, I had directed to be sent to Providence by Water, but Mr president Weare writes me that the risque is too great, as there are a number of privateers in that quarter—I have therefore informed him that you will dispose of it on the spot and procure a like quantity in Philada. I shall be obliged to...
Inclosed is the Copy of a letter which I have just recd from Capt. Mitchell commanding the post at Wyoming, representing his distress for provision. As this post was to have been supplied by Pennsylvania, and as you have now undertaken to furnish the supplies required of the state, I must request you to take the speediest means of giving relief to the Garrison—The quantity of provision which I...