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Letter not found. 16 July 1810. Acknowledged in Monroe to JM, 25 July 1810 . Concerns the employment of Bizet, a French gardener.
Letter not found. 4 February 1786. Recorded in “Letters from J. M. [to] Mr. Monroe” (DLC) as “unimportant.”
Letter not found. Ca. 5 July 1789. Acknowledged in Monroe to JM, 19 July 1789 . Reports passage of impost and tonnage bills by Congress.
The enclosed Sketch, from the pen of Mr. Crowninshield, contains such pertinent and valuable information respecting the trade to India, as to induce an attempt, though late, to convey it to you. I have the honor to be, Gentlemen, with great respect & consideration, Your most obed. Servt. DLC .
I this moment only receive your letter of the 17th. Mine by this mail renders nothing more necessary in answer to it. I understand Mr. Crawford is so far recovered that he hopes to be on the road for Washington in a few days. His weakness I presume will make his journey very slow. Sending this with some other letters by an extra messenger who will hardly reach the P. Office in time I add only...
I thank you for the copy of your Message. The moderation it breathes towards Spain will be approved generally at present, & universally hereafter. The time is passed when this policy could be ascribed to any other than its true motive. The present standing of the U.S. will secure to it a just interpretation every where. It is very satisfactory to learn that the greatest powers in Europe are...
You will have seen by my letter of the 6th. inst. which went by Sundry conveyances, that the bill Suspending the non-intercourse act had passed the House of Representatives. I now enclose it in the form of a law, with an amendment providing for a further Suspension by the Executive in case the State of things between the two countries Should require it. In the Senate the vote for the Bill was...
I have the honor to recommend to your attention the case of Messrs Francis and Charles Bradbury, explained in the enclosed document, in order that you may aid them in regaining the proceeds of the sales of their property at Buenos Ayres, if the suggestion of their having passed into the hands of the British, at the capture of the place should prove to be well founded. I have the honor &c. DNA...
14 December 1794, Philadelphia. Introduces Robert S. Van Rensselaer, who “proposes to make a tour through some parts of Europe, and wishes for an opportunity of being made known to you.” RC ( MH ). 1 p. Addressed by JM to Monroe, “Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States / Paris,” and marked “Mr. Van Renselaer.” Calendared as letter not found in PJM Robert J. Brugger et al., eds., The...
Letter not found. Ca. 17 September 1792. Acknowledged in Monroe to JM, 18 Sept. 1792 . Encloses a draft of the article that Monroe revised and Dunlap’s Am. Daily Advertiser published on 22 Sept. Also encloses excerpts from Jefferson’s correspondence that were quoted in this article (see Monroe to JM, 9 Oct. 1792 ).
Letter not found. 14 December 1794, Philadelphia. Introduces Robert S. Van Rensselaer. RC offered for sale by Leonard & Co., Auctioneers, Catalogue of a Valuable Private Library, Including … Rare Autograph Letters (Boston, 9 May 1866), p. 15, item 7.
Letter not found. 14 September 1788 . Acknowledged in Monroe to JM, 24 Sept. 1788 . Discusses the act of Congress establishing New York as the first seat of the new government.
You will have seen by my letter of the 6th. which went by sundry other conveyances, that the Bill suspending the non importation act had passed the House of Representatives. I now inclose it in the form of a law, with an amendment providing for a further suspension by the Executive in case the state of things between the two Countries should require it. In the Senate the vote for the Bill was...
31 January 1802, Washington. Introduces Prince Ruspoli, who has been recommended by Mr. King and through him by Mr. West. Ruspoli “proposes to make an excursion from Richmond, by the way of Monticello, to the Natural bridge; & returning thence, to proceed thro’ Norfolk to Charl[e]stown by water.” RC ( DLC ). 1 p. Incomplete. Docketed by Monroe.
It will be proper to take the steps suggested by Mr. Joy for obtaining further information. My enquiry as to Nootka Sound had reference to the grounds of the Brit. claim there, and its analogy to that of the U. S. at the mouth of Columbia. See Vancouvre’s acct. of the B. proceedings at Nootka: also Capt: Morris’s communication to Mr. Graham Ocr. 24. 1816. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
[ Paris, 4 July 1785 . Entry in SJL reads: “Madison, Monroe & Hardy. Letters of recommendation for W. T. Franklin.” None of these letters has been found; but see TJ to Monroe, 5 July 1785 .]
Mr. Clinton, the Mayor of New York, having understood that Capt. Whitby has stated that he is in possession of an affidavit tending to shew that the place where Pierce was killed last spring by a shot from the Leander was not within the jurisdiction of the United States, has furnished the inclosed documents to set the matter in a clear light. I have the honor to be &c. DNA : RG...
Inferring from the silence of the Newspapers, since they announced your appointment as a visitor of the University, that your answer did not require a replacing one, I take for granted that you will be with your colleagues at the legal place & period. Allow me to count on your being thus far on your way in time for us to proceed hence together. I propose to set out on saturday after next, and...
Tho’ sorry to trouble you so often I must ask the further favor of you to let me have from the War Dept. a copy of Genl. Harrison’s letter of Resignation. It bears date the eleventh of May 1814. Also a copy of the letter of the Secy. of war acknowledging its receipt; date May 24. Also copy of the Secy’ letter to Harrison of May 28. accepting the Resignation of Harrison. Yrs. always RC ( DLC :...
§ To James Monroe. 20 February 1806, Department of State. “Mr Samuel Grove represents that he has several claims upon the British Government for injuries sustained from its officers during the occupation of part of St Domingo, in the last war. If you can render him any aid, consistently with the nature of the case and of your functions, I request that you will be pleased to do it.” Letterbook...
The President having this day coplied with the recommendation in your letter of Septr. 12. by a special message to Congress on the subject of the non-importation act of the last Session, I lose not a moment in forwarding to Mr. Merry’s care the inclosed copy. Hoping that it will either find him still at Alexandria, or overtake him before the Vessel gets out of reach. I remain with great...
Yesterday being the appointed day for the meeting of Congress, a quorum was made in both Houses, and this day the message of the President w as communicated to them. I embrace the earliest opportunity of inclosing a copy, and remain, &c DNA : RG 59—IM—Instructions to Ministers.
By an opportunity to Richd. I wrote to you 2 days ago. Havg. now one to Frebg. I inclose the Cypher then promised. It will probably get to hand at the same with letter via Richd. Adieu. RC ( DLC ). Addressed to Monroe in Congress, “To care of [Mr. Ma]ury Esqr. Fredg.” Docketed by JM, “Mr. Monroe Cypher.” The date is fixed from the message JM sent Monroe on 12 Apr. 1785 . Enclosure ( DLC ).
Mr. De Neuville arrived here on Saturday and sets out this morning on his return. I inclose his letter of Credence with a note of the date of its delivery. Be so good as to have an answer to the K. of the Netherlands sent to me for signature. That to the K. of Wertemburg is returned. Friendly respects The inclosed letters from J.B. may be worth attention in estimating and comparing characters...
The enclosed papers, respecting the practices of British traders with the Indians, to instigate them against the United States, were received through General Wilkinson. They exemplify so strikingly the inconvenience of the intercourse with the Indians as it is now established by the treaty, that I have thought them a necessary supplement to my letter of the 30 May last. I have the honor to be,...
Mr. Erskine has presented, by instructions from his Government, a communication of the late British order against the trade between the ports of France and others therein described. With a copy of that, I inclose one of the answer given to the communication. It will not only put you in possession of what will be transmitted by Mr Erskine to his Government, but also of the sentiments of the...
Letter not found. 27 August 1800. Acknowledged in Monroe to JM, 9 Sept. 1800 . Informs Monroe that JM has hired Richard McGee as overseer for Monroe’s Albemarle County farm.
It is presumed that Dr. Judson is sufficiently respectable to be commended for his benevolent & patriotic views; and to be informed that they will be facilitated by suitable instructions to the post officers. These will be given by the Treasury & navy Depts. on a communication of this memorandum, by the Secy. of State. If the Secy. of State does not view Dr. J. & his plan in the light here...
29 November 1802, Department of State, Washington. “I beg the favor of you to insert Mr. christian name, in the enclosed commission, to send it to him and inform me of the name you shall insert.” Letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 59, DL , vol. 14). 1 p. Left blank in letterbook. This was probably James Nimms. In a 2 Dec. 1802 note to JM, Jefferson wrote: “Mr. Nimms the Commr. of bkrptcy appointed for...
There is much force in the reasons given herein for an appt. of a Successor to Genl. Smith, which I had proposed to delay till our return to Washington, if not till the meeting of Congs. Unless you think some other preferable on the whole to the Depy: Marshal, direct a Commission for him, or if you please a blank one, to be made out & forwarded for our signature. Yrs NN : Papers of James Monroe.
Letter not found. ca. 31 August 1786, Philadelphia. JM expressed his anxiety at being unable to repay Monroe the money he had advanced on their purchase of Mohawk lands. Mentioned in Monroe to JM, 12 and 25 September 1786 .
The boundaries between the Indian tribes are very uncertain in themselves, and difficult to be understood. As the expence of extinguishing their claims is inconsiderable, humanity and policy also may prescribe to the U.S. a double purchase as preferable to the risk of doing injustice; and creating hostile dispositions. On this principle the Govt. is proceeding, and will, as fast as...
I have left the inclosed open for your inspection and beg the favor of you to forward it by some safe conveyance, if you have not in the mean while been apprized of Mr. Harris’s having received a duplicate. I have the honor to be &c DNA : RG 59—IM—Instructions to Ministers.
To my requests the day before yesterday I forgot to add that of a Copy of As letter to Harrison acknowledging the receipt of his Resignation; the date only being formerly asked for & sent in your last. Yours RC ( DLC : Monroe Papers); draft ( DLC ). RC docketed by Monroe. Minor differences between the copies have not been noted.
I have just recd. yours of the 26. and return the projected answer to Adml. Cochrane, with a few pencilled alterations, which you will perceive the Scope of; and adopt, or remodify as you may think best. The last one is intended to obviate the apparent inconsistency occurring to you. The only ground on which the B. Govt. could properly, or prudently call the attention of this to the affair in...
I now return the letters to you from Mr. Purviance & Cambaceres, with an acknowledgment of those in which they were inclosed. The papers last recd. from you in relation to Mr. Skipwith will be of use in establishing one or two material points. His case has been a hard one, but it may be questioned whether he be well founded in the extent of his claims for interest & Agency for Claims. The...
The views with which the U.S. entered into the war, necessarily dispose them to a just peace. The promptitude with which the mediation of H.I.M. was accepted and the purpose of sending ministers to St.P. without waiting for the determination of G.B. is proof of this disposition. An armistice as sparing an effusion of blood, & as contemplating an auspicious result to the mediation, can not...
Your favor of Jany. 26. came duly to hand. The information I wish to be obtained from Genl. Jackson is 1st. What was the form & dates of the appointments of Brigadier, and of Brevet Major General, accepted by him in his letter of June 8th. 1814. to the Secy. of war; and what the date of the Secretary’s letter inclosing the appointments. The term “form” refers to the distinction between...
Yours of the 1st. inst: came on slowly. I return the letter from Mr. Ingersoll whose continued drudgery in his profession, would be to be lamented, if his release from it would ensure such fruits of his literary pen, as one of his discourses to the Society, Philosophical (I think), which contained the ablest & most valuable Tableau of the Condition of the U. S. that has been published. I...
At the request of Mr. R. Harrison, who is well acquainted with the Bearer Mr. James H. Hooe, I introduce this Gentleman to your civilities. He is charged with some business interesting to a friend of Mr. Harrison, which it is supposed may be aided by your advice, and perhaps claim your official attention. These considerations will more than apologize for the liberty I have taken, and will...
Yours of the 21st. is just recd. I am sorry to learn that your health continues to fluctuate, as well as that you are detained from your intended trip, which would doubtless aid it, by the causes you mention. I hope the next information will be more favorable. The omission to sanction the appt. of Commodore Lewis ⟨pr⟩oceeded from a misapprehension of your letter. I thought, on a hasty […] my...
I have recd. a letter from H. Lee dated Nashville Aug. 24. stating that he had corresponded with Genl. Armstrong on the subject of the provisional order to Genl. Jackson of July 18. 1814, authorizing him on certain conditions to take possession of Pensacola; which order was not recd. by the General till on or about the 14th. of March 1815; and then open, and the envelope without postmark; and...
I ascribe to the heat of the weather my not having yet had the pleasure of your promised visit. We hope when the obstacle is removed that we shall have the gratification increased by the company of Mrs. Monroe. Among the papers now forwarded is another note from Mr. F. His late ones breathe a spirit which it is difficult to account for without the painful supposition that he believes it not...
I have received from Mr. Graham the Communications to you from Algiers, which being copies I do not return. The course before us is obvious. The ground taken in the last instructions, must be adhered to. The Dey must distinctly understand, that altho’ we prefer peace we are prepared for War; and will make no change in the late treaty, nor concession of any sort to avoid it. It appears from...
The inclosed is of little consequence, but you will see that it ought to have been addressed to you. Dr. Eustis & his lady having given us a call, it was agreed that he & myself shd. make a short visit to Mr. Jefferson of whose state of health, I had never been able to get any precise information. We found him substantially restored from his indisposition, with good appetite, and in the daily...
I inclose a copy of a letter from Messrs Levi Hollingsworth and Co. of Philada, in which they complain that after an unjust sentence of condemnation passed upon their property at Tortola it was so far undervalued that a reversal of the sentence will leave them very considerable losers. If you can aid them, in any advisable mode, to diminish the sacrifice I pray you to do it. But as their case...
Still without authentic information from Abroad. The Halifax papers expect Adml. Warren with a naval force, and an offer of peace. It appears that Wellington has gained a victory over Marmont; The extent of it not ascertained. From the West the accounts are that a B & Indn. force amounting to about 600 left Malden after the surrender of Detroit, to attack F. Wayne, & in case of success, to...
On perusing your letters to Mr. De Neuville, and Mr. Gallatin, some ideas occurred which induced me to put them on paper for your consideration. Those relating to the first letter are interlined with a pencil. Those relating to the 2d. are partly so, & partly penned on a separate sheet. In the communication to Mr. G. I thought it might be not amiss to suggest the several topics which he may...
I have recd yours covering the letters to Mr. Changuion & Genl. P. My hint as to the pecuniary arrangements for tracing the cases of the Negroes carried off was not meant to limit the amt. necessary for so important an object, but to diminish as much as possible the pecuniary discretion and the vague pretensions of the agents, so much perplexity having been experienced from such sources. I am...
After all the vicissitudes through which the assumption has passed, it seems at present in a fair way to succeed as part of the general plan for the public debt. The Senate have included it among their amendments to the funding bill, and a vote of yesterday in the House of Representatives indicates a small majority in favor of the measure. In its present form it will very little affect the...