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I herewith inclose a Commission and letters of Credence authorizing you to treat with the British Government concerning the maritime wrongs which have been committed, and the regulation of Commerce and navigation, between the parties. Your authority is made several as well as joint, as a provision for any contingency depriving either of the co-operation of the other. The importance of the...
Your letter of April 25th. inclosing the British project of a Convention of limits, and your proposed amendments, has been duly received. The following observations explain the terms on which the President authorizes you to close and sign the instrument. lst. The modification of the 5th. Art. (noted as one which the British Commissioners would have agreed to) may be admitted, in case that...
21 June 1805, Department of State. “I have the honor to inclose an extract of a letter I have had occasion to write to Genl Armstrong containing some supplementary observations on the controversy with Spain, not comprehended in my letter to you of the 23d May which was forwarded to Madrid. “I also forward some private letters by this opportunity of a gentleman going from Alexandria.” Letterbook...
I may perhaps consult too much my own wishes public & personal, and too little a proper estimate of yours, in intimating the near approach of a vacancy in the Department of State, which will present to your comparison, as far as lies with me, that sphere for your patriotic services, with the one in which they are now rendered. Should such a transfer of them be inadmissible or ineligible, on...
Presuming on your havg returned home, at the time you intended, I send you a mass of the letters &ce which have successively reached me during your absence. Some of them are of very inferior importance, but it may be well to give you an opportunity of lightening your future burden. The convention necessarily brought up the question whether it required an anticipated meeting of Congs....
My letter of March 18th. acknowledged the receipt of your dispatches and of the Treaty signed on the 31st. of December, of which Mr Purviance was the bearer, and signified that the sentiments and views of the President formed on the actual posture of our affairs with Great Britain, would without any needless delay, be communicated. The subject is accordingly resumed, in this dispatch, with...
On reflection, I deem it adviseable for me to have Copies of the several papers which you communicated to me in our interview on Saturday evening, including the notes, and the fragment of Mr. Reynolds’ letter to Mr. Clingman. I therefore request that you will either cause copies of these papers to be furnished to me, taken by the person in whose hand writing the declarations which you shewed...
Finding from a letter of Mr. Mazzei that you have never been furnished with a copy of the Bill for establishing the Christian Religion in this State, I now inclose one, regretting that I had taken it for granted that you must have been supplied thro’ some other channel. A very warm opposition will be made to this innovation by the people of the middle and back Counties, particularly the...
You will be herewith furnished with a joint Commission to treat with His Catholic Majesty, and with a letter of credence to him. For the object of the Commission and as a guide to your negotiations, I refer you to the instructions given in relation to the French Government. Whatever portion of the arrangements contemplated may be found to depend not on the French, but on the Spanish...
The President having this day coplied with the recommendation in your letter of Septr. 12. by a special message to Congress on the subject of the non-importation act of the last Session, I lose not a moment in forwarding to Mr. Merry’s care the inclosed copy. Hoping that it will either find him still at Alexandria, or overtake him before the Vessel gets out of reach. I remain with great...
Under the 3d Article of the Treaty of 1794, as it has been expounded, Indian Traders on each side have a right to resort to and trade with the Tribes within the limits of the other party; with an exception of the Country covered by the charter of the Hudson’s Bay company. This article is found in its operation to be very seriously detrimental to the United States. 1st It gives to the British...
The enclosed papers, respecting the practices of British traders with the Indians, to instigate them against the United States, were received through General Wilkinson. They exemplify so strikingly the inconvenience of the intercourse with the Indians as it is now established by the treaty, that I have thought them a necessary supplement to my letter of the 30 May last. I have the honor to be,...
I am favoured with yours of the 18th. of March. My last answered your preceding one relating to your territorial speculation. I hope it has been reced. I forgot to intimate to you, though I presume it would have been superfluous, that it will be well in every purchase to ascertain by information as far as possible, the proportion of land which lies on the river and comes within the description...
I have your letter of this date. It gives me pleasure to receive your explanation of the ambiguous phraze in the paper No V., published with your signatures and that of Mr Venable, and your confirmation of the fact, that my explanation had been satisfactory to you. You express your surprise at the contents of a paper in the Gazette of the U. States of the 8 instant. If you will review that...
The enclosed Sketch, from the pen of Mr. Crowninshield, contains such pertinent and valuable information respecting the trade to India, as to induce an attempt, though late, to convey it to you. I have the honor to be, Gentlemen, with great respect & consideration, Your most obed. Servt. DLC .