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The inclosed is of little consequence, but you will see that it ought to have been addressed to you. Dr. Eustis & his lady having given us a call, it was agreed that he & myself shd. make a short visit to Mr. Jefferson of whose state of health, I had never been able to get any precise information. We found him substantially restored from his indisposition, with good appetite, and in the daily...
I received three days ago your favor of Apr. 12. You therein speak of a former letter to me, but it has not come to hand, nor any other of later date than the 14th. of December. My last to you was of the 11th. of May by Mr. Adams who went in the packet of that month. These conveiances are now becoming deranged. We have had expectations of their coming to Havre which would infinitely facilitate...
I have recd. your favors of the 16 & 17. The communication of de Forrest is extremely interesting. The view it gives of the B. policy towards the U.S. is so strikingly just, and so strictly accords with that which has regulated the course of the Executive that it is much to be regretted that his paper is not in a form and is without an authority, to be published. If it had been in the form of...
I inclose a copy of a letter from Messrs Levi Hollingsworth and Co. of Philada, in which they complain that after an unjust sentence of condemnation passed upon their property at Tortola it was so far undervalued that a reversal of the sentence will leave them very considerable losers. If you can aid them, in any advisable mode, to diminish the sacrifice I pray you to do it. But as their case...
Still without authentic information from Abroad. The Halifax papers expect Adml. Warren with a naval force, and an offer of peace. It appears that Wellington has gained a victory over Marmont; The extent of it not ascertained. From the West the accounts are that a B & Indn. force amounting to about 600 left Malden after the surrender of Detroit, to attack F. Wayne, & in case of success, to...
The strange jumble of names, places, & titles on the inclosed letter seemed to authorise me to open it, as it does also to forward it to you. yet it properly belongs to neither of us but to the Secretary of the Treasury to whom it makes splendid promises. Our election of electors took place yesterday. a general assurance that there would be no opposition ticket prevented half the voters from...
My letters of Nov. 11. and Dec. 10. will have reached you before your receipt of this. They acknowleged the receipt of your former letters, as this does of the one of Nov. 1. but what was my mortification when I came to apply the cypher to it to find that I could not make out one syllable of it: and the more so as it is the only letter I have received from America by this packet. Whether you...
On perusing your letters to Mr. De Neuville, and Mr. Gallatin, some ideas occurred which induced me to put them on paper for your consideration. Those relating to the first letter are interlined with a pencil. Those relating to the 2d. are partly so, & partly penned on a separate sheet. In the communication to Mr. G. I thought it might be not amiss to suggest the several topics which he may...
Considering that I had not been to Bedford for a twelve month before, I thought myself singularly unfortunate in so timing my journey as to have been absent exactly at the moment of your visit to our neighborhood. the loss indeed was all my own; for in these short interviews with you, I generally get my political compass rectified, learn from you whereabouts we are, and correct my course...
I now return mr Clarke’s & Shee’s letters inclosed in your’s of yesterday. mr Clarke’s object is to save 6. cents a stock. this is proper for him as an economical manager. but you & I must see of what other aspects it is susceptible. the US. have gun stocks for sale . they are to suspend the sale & lend them to the state of Virginia, that she may return them in kind afterwards with a saving to...
I have recd yours covering the letters to Mr. Changuion & Genl. P. My hint as to the pecuniary arrangements for tracing the cases of the Negroes carried off was not meant to limit the amt. necessary for so important an object, but to diminish as much as possible the pecuniary discretion and the vague pretensions of the agents, so much perplexity having been experienced from such sources. I am...
After all the vicissitudes through which the assumption has passed, it seems at present in a fair way to succeed as part of the general plan for the public debt. The Senate have included it among their amendments to the funding bill, and a vote of yesterday in the House of Representatives indicates a small majority in favor of the measure. In its present form it will very little affect the...
I have your two favors of the 11 & 15. instant. The letter inclosed in the first is returned, Mr. Livingston having sailed before it could reach N. Y. and the letter for which it was to be substituted, having before gone on to him. The letter inclosed in the latter is also inclosed, with a note at the bottom of it by the President which will serve for an answer. We think the best mode of...
I recd your favor of by Mr. Hughs, the bearer of the public dispatches from you & Mr L. The purchase of Louisiana in its full extent, tho’ not contemplated is received with warm, & in a manner universal approbation. The uses to which it may be turned, render it a truly noble acquisition. Under prudent management it may be made to do much good as well as to prevent much evil. By lessening the...
In my last I promised to advise you of the result of the Voninteer Expedition from East Tennessee United with the troops of the United States that march against the Semenolia Indians after a march of near Seven hundred miles with out being retarded by Ice Snow hammocks or Marshes which afforded the Enemy great Oppertunities for advantague we arrived at Paynes Town in the Lochway Settlements...
I dropped you a line on the 10th. informing you of a nomination I had made of you to the Senate, and yesterday I inclosed you their approbation not then having time to write. the agitation of the public mind on occasion of the late suspension of our right of deposit at N. Orleans is extreme. in the Western country it is natural and grounded on honest motives. in the seaports it proceeds from a...
I inclose you the letters on finance, for perusal. I had not an opportunity of proposing the reading them to the President , there being much company with him. when will the ladies & yourself do us the favor of a visit? RC ( NN : Monroe Papers); dateline at foot of text; addressed: “The Secretary of State”; with endorsement and notes by Monroe on verso. Not recorded in SJL . Enclosures: TJ to...
Neither of the two last posts brought me a line from you. I find one in the office for Mr. Jones who is absent on a visit to King George. I expect him back on Monday next. Our proceedings throughout this week have turned chiefly on the bill for assize Courts, which yesterday passed the H. of D. after a faint opposition and with very few dissenting voices. It is formed pretty much on the...
I this moment receive your favor of the 30th. It gives me much pleasure, that you have so soon got rid of your fever. Whenever you come on you[r] visit to Albemarle, I should be glad to see you, if you could make this a Stage and be reconciled to the little delay it would incur. I can with great conveniency give you a conveyance for the residue of the journey; and if apprized in time wd. have...
Your favor of Mar. 14. has been duly recieved. in that you ask if my letter to mr Morse may be communicated to the gentlemen of the administration and other friends. in the first place the former are entitled to it’s communication from mr Morse as named members of his society. but independantly of that, a letter addressed to a society of 6. or 8000 people is de facto made public. I had...
I have written several letters of late in which I have been pretty full in my details and remarks. In one of them I acknowledged your letter to Mr. R of Decr. 18. and stated my reasons for not witholding it. I have since recd. the original of that letter sent by the way of Havre, together with the copies of it submitted to my discretion; which I have thought it most consistent with your...
I request to be informed whether the paper numbered V dated Philadelphia the 15 of December 1792 published partly in the fifth and partly in the sixth number of “The History of the United States for 1796” and having the signatures of James Monroe, Abraham Venable and F A Mughlenberg is the copy of a genuine original. I am Sir   Yr. humble servt ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For...
A most distressing picture has been presented to me of the condition of Mr. Cathcart and his numerous family, in the hope that as his official services which have had such a termination, were rendered whilst the Executive administration was in my hands, I might be induced to say something in his behalf. It is impossible to learn his actual distress and alarming prospects without sympathy; but...
Inclosed herewith is the Cypher you are to carry with you. I send it apart from the despatches, because I shall put a few words in them into Cypher. The despatches will probably go off on wednesday morning, or thursday at farthest. They have been delayed by the slowness of Congs. in passing the law for which they waited. I recd. last evening yours of the 22d. & expect to hear further from you...
It being presumed that by the time of your receiving this communication, the Negotiation with which you were charged by my letter of 5th. January last, will no longer require your presence in London, the President thinks it proper that you should now proceed to Madrid, and in conjunction with Mr. Pinckney open a negotiation on the important subjects remaining to be adjusted with the Spanish...
Your favor of July 27. from Plattsburg was duly received, and I am very glad to learn from it, that the fatiguing scenes through which you have passed, had not prevented some improvement in your health. The sequel of your journey will have been still more friendly to it, as affording a larger proportion of the salutary part of your exercise. I hope you will find an ample reward for all the...
Your favor of the 6th. came to hand last night. mr Erving had left town two days before: however it will go tomorrow morning by a private hand. it will much more than satisfy him. I am persuaded he will recieve it with extreme pleasure. I either expressed myself badly in my letter, or you have understood the expressions too generally. I never doubted the impropriety of our adopting as a system...
I have recd. your letter of the 23d. and learn with much pleasure that you are not disinclined to the Station wch. the one answered by it, presented to your consideration. In discharging the duties of this Station, I am aware that the Functionary must carry into it, a just respect for his own principles, and above all for the dictates of his Conscience. But with the mutual knowledge of our...
I am to acknolege the receipt of your favors of May 8. and 23. and to express my perfect satisfaction with what you have done in the case of Barrett. With respect to the interest from the date of the judgment it is a thing of course, and always as just as the judgment itself. If he swears that the account is unpaid, I shall be satisfied he believes it to be so, and in that case would always...
In the hurry of acknowledging yours of Ocr. 17. recd. at the last moment of the opportunity for the post office, I did not advert to the passage relating to enquiries to be made of Genl. Jackson. I hope you have not delayed your intended letter to him on that account. I should suppose it might be quite proper to ask from him copies of the documents appointing him Brigadier or Majr. General by...
The inclosed answers your favor of the 29 th Ult. on the value of your lands. I had had great hopes that while in your present office you would break up the degrading practice of considering the President’s house as a general tavern, and economise sufficiently to come out of it clear of difficulties. I learn the contrary with great regret. your society during the little time I have left would...
I have recd. your favor of the 13th. I beg that you will not think of the pecuniary subject till it be in every respect, perfectly convenient to you. The real sense of the nation with regard to the Revolutionary struggle in S. America can not, I should suppose, be mistaken. Good wishes for its success, and every lawful manifestation of them, will be approved by all, whatever may be the...
I inclose a letter from a M r John Dortic , who being bound to France shortly and to return again, wishes to be the bearer of any dispatches the government may have for that country. of this person I know nothing more than that he brought me lately a packet of seeds from M. Thouin Director of the National garden of France , which he very kindly notified me of from N.Y. and afterwards forwarded...
I find the calculation of the As of Holland (which is the common measure applied by the Encyclopedie to all coins) will be so difficult to trace through the coins and weights of Holland and Spain, that no public assembly will ever understand them. Consequently it is better to rest the question altogether on the report of the Board of Treasury of Apr. 8. 1786. and the Consequent Final decision...
I have not written to you by mr Purviance because he can give you vivâ voce all the details of our affairs here with a minuteness beyond the bounds of a letter, and because indeed I am not certain this letter will find you in England. the sole object in writing it is to add another little commission to the one I had formerly troubled you with. it is to procure for me a ‘machine for...
The turn which our affairs have taken at Madrid renders it expedient in the judgment of the President that you should proceed thither without delay in execution of the instructions heretofore given with such alterations and additions as are contained in this letter. You will of course make such communications to the British Government on your departure, as will guard your mission against...
I communicated to Mr. M. the evening I was with him the papers you sent by me for Mr. D. He was clearly of opinion nothing further ought to be done. D. was decisively of the same opinion. This being the case then there was no ground for consulting L. or B. and accordingly nothing has been said to them. Your book was later coming out than was to have been wished: however it works irresistably....
I have recd. yours of the 7th. You will not doubt that our sympathies have been fully with you during the afflictions which have befallen you. I think you have done well in chusing your present situation, & for the reasons you express. I hope you will experience from it all the improvement which your health needs, and every advantage promised by it. My fear is that the Winter may be too rude...
I am late in answering your favor of the 4th. because the Navy department, from an extraordinary press of business, could not till within this day or two furnish me the inclosed papers . you will see by them that the money for Gosport (12,000. D.) has been placed in Norfolk at mr Hopkins’s command, ever since the last week in January. why it should have been witheld so long he will probably...
I have received your favor of the 5th. inst. and have attended to the several objects suggested in it. Mordecai having given up all his effects to the Assignees can do nothing for his creditors. He tells me that a dividend will certainly be made in April & not before, and that he shall pay about 15/. in the pound. I have applied also to Crowley, and having little confidence in my own judgment...
Your favor of the 22d. has been duly recd. I am so much aware that you have not a moment to spare from your public duties, that I insist on your never answering my letters out of mere civility. This rule I hope will be applied to the present as well as future letters. My quere as to the expedition agst. Amelia Island turned solely on the applicability of the Executive Power to such a case....
I have just recd. your favor of this date. I need not express the perfect confidence I feel in the friendly & considerate inducements to your suggestion. But having made definitive preparation for the intended visit; having in no instance omitted it for many years, & the motive being strengthened by the late one recd. by myself, I think the omission, if tested by prudential calculations of a...
I have rcd. your favor of the 3d. I am much obliged by the kind manner in which you speak of my Nephew. I hope you will always consider expressions of my good will in such cases as perfectly subordinate to public considerations, and superi[o]r pretensions. In the present case I am not sure that the appt. of my nephew to the place in question ought to be desired even by himself, unless Col:...
Having received from Mr. Merry, a communication of the notice given by his Government to the Foreign Ministers at London, on the 8th. April last, on the proposed blockade of the four German Rivers, it was thought proper without waiting for the communication through you, to give an answer containing the observations which you will find in the inclosed copy of it. They will be a guide to you in...
The past week has been rendered important by nothing but some discussions on the subject of British debts. The bill brought in varied from that which miscarried last year 1. by adding provision in favor of the Creditor for securing payment at the dates of the instalments 2 by annexing a clause empowering the Executive to suspend the operation of the Act in case Congress should notify their...
Since my last to you , the Directors of the Rivanna company have changed their minds, and instead of going through my canal they have determined to go through the bed of the river; and it being a question between us, whether they or I must build & maintain the lock at my dam, which dam they must have built had I not done it, they have proposed a reference to Arbitrators, to which I gladly...
When I retired from the government, I yielded with too much facility, first to the importunities of my friends to aid them in getting commands in the army and navy, next of mere acquaintances, and lastly of those also of whom I knew nothing. the business became laborious and irksome to myself, and, as I was sufficiently sensible, embarrassing and unpleasant to the government. determined at...
I observe that the resolution of the legislature of Virginia , of Jan. 23. in desiring us to look out for some proper place to which insurgent negroes may be sent, expresses a preference of the continent of Africa, or some of the Spanish or Portuguese settlements in S. America: in which preference, & especially as to the former I entirely concur. on looking towards Africa for our object, the...
Since the communications by the Revenge which sailed on monday last, nothing very material has occurred. The British squadron, on receiving the Proclamation, fell down to the capes, near which (in Lynhaven Bay) several of the same or substituted ships remain. It is not known whether any orders have been recd. from the Admiral relative to their conduct under the Proclamation. They continue to...
Your favor of yesterday was duly delivered by your servant; and I herewith inclose the copies you request, of the papers formerly transmitted to me. The originals I shall forwd. to Mr. D. as you suggest. I send also your letter to Van Staphorst & his answer, which I found with the other papers & which may possibly be of use now or hereafter in refreshing your memory or otherwise. The other...