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I have recd. from Mr. Lear engaged in settling the accounts of General Hull, a request of what I may recollect on the question, whether there was a stipulation or understanding, that the General was to receive his salary as Governour, as well as his military pay. I have simply answered that my memory does not furnish any evidence which ought to influence the decision of the question. As the...
Reynolds , collector of York, is dead, and Wm. Carey of that place is recommended very strongly by mr Shields. tho’ I have great confidence in mr Shields’s recommendation, yet as the best men some times see characters thro’ the false medium of friendship I pray you to make what enquiry you can in Richmond & communicate it to me. Accept assurances of my constant & affectionate esteem & respect....
In addition to the depositions I had the honour of handing you during my Stay at Washington, I now beg leave to transmit herewith one, made by Mr. Jos: R. Paxson, a passenger arrived in the Cartel Fair American, who states a Conversation had with one of the Gentlemen at the head of the Alien office, from which it would appear that the British Government are desirous that the liberality they...
I recd. yours of the 10th. with a full sense of your kindness in taking so much interest in my health. Subsequent to your call on me, I had a return of fever which reduced me to a state of greater weakness than I had before experienced. For several weeks passed, have been on the recovery in strength as well as health; and if no relapse takes place, I may be able to give my attendance at...
[ Philadelphia, 25 May 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “[May] 25. Colo. Monroe. Inclosed the 270. Dollars back again—I pay Boinod 2⅓ for him—inclosed the Gov’s and Jamieson’s letters to him—shall sail from Boston about 20th June—Short to hasten—acknolege receipt of cypher.” Letter and enclosures not found. The letter from Gov. Harrison may have been that to TJ of 14 May 1784 , and that from David...
Since you left us we have no further intelligence from N. Orleans, except a letter dated Jany 20 from the vice Consular agent there, from which it appears that the letters to the Govr. & Intendant from the Spanish Minister here, had arrived abt. the 13th. and had not on the 20th. produced the desired change in the state of things. The delay however does not seem to have been viewed by the...
Yours of Jan. 4. was recieved last night. I had then no expectation of any opportunity of communicating to you confidentially information of the state of opinions here. but I learn to-night that two mr Randolphs will set out tomorrow morning for Richmond. if I can get this into their hands I shall send it. otherwise it may wait long. on the subject of an election by a general ticket or by...
We have now been near six weeks settled in our new domicil, where we do not abandon the hope of welcoming you and your amiable family, notwithstanding the damp thrown on it by your last letter. The Season of year, tho’ frequently an obstacle, frequently also presents favorable spells, of which we have had already a fine specimen, & seem to be promised more. Mrs. Monroe’s health might be aided...
I just find by the letters from W. that you had at length been liberated from your detention there. Mr. Graham having left the packet for you unsealed, I have glanced over the papers relating to Grassin & the letters of Foster. I am glad to find that the Owner of the Privateer, domicil[i]ated here, is taken in hand. There can be no legal difficulty I presume in dealing with him. Foster seems...
I wrote you on the 8th. instant enclosing a pamphlet on the principle in question between this Country & G.B. and mentioned that it would be communicated by the Presidt. with other documents on the subject. This will not be done, and I have written to recall the letter & pamphlets from the ports to which they were sent. If either of the copies should have gone to sea & should reach you, be so...
I wrote you last on the 21st. of Mar. since which yours of the 26th. of March is recieved. Yesterday I had a consultation with mr Dawson on the matter respecting Skipwith . we have neither of us the least hesitation, on a view of the ground, to pronounce against your coming forward in it at all. your name would be the watchword of party at this moment, and the question would give opportunities...
The condemnation of the cargo of the Olive Branch having been reversed, General Allen finds himself in the situation pointed out at the close of my letter of the 13th of December 1803 of having gained no more by his judicial pursuit than an abstract decision of the illegality of the capture: for Messrs. Bird, Savage & Bird, of London, who became his sureties on the delivery of the property to...
I recd by the last mail a letter from J. H. Causten, accompanied by a huge volume of Documents, and a stout pamphlet of arguments, with a printed letter to him from Mr. Pickering, on the mercantile claims agst. France and the release of her from them by the U.S. All these articles have been doubtless sent to you also, as I am requested by Mr. C. to forward the inclosed Certificate of Agency,...
I have duly recd. your favor of the 5th. followed by a copy of the public documents; for which I give you many thanks. I should like to get a copy of the Journals of the Convention. Are they to be purchased & where? It appears to me, as it does to you, that a coupling of Missouri with Maine, in order to force the entrance of the former thro’ the door voluntarily opened for the latter is, to...
I thank you for your letter of the 6 th . it is a proof of your friendship, and of the sincere interest you take in whatever concerns me. of this I have never had a moment’s doubt, and have ever valued it as a precious treasure. the question indeed whether I knew or approved of Gen l Wilkinson’s endeavors to prevent the restoration of the right of deposit at N. Orleans could never require a...
The letters from you of latest date are those of Octr. 23. 24, & 29—and of Jany 12 & 20th. The three first have been heretofore acknowledged. For the interesting contents of the two last I now thank you. I have given the explanation you desired, as to Mr. Paine, to F. A. M. who has not recd. any letter as yet, and has promised to pay due regard to your request. It is proper you should know...
Supposing the particulars of the New York election interesting to you, I will give you a statement of the votes, as follows. Clinton Jay Suffolk  481. 228 Queen’s county  532 288 King’s county  244 92 City & County of N.Y.  603 739 Orange  551 80 Dutchess  751
I recieved yesterday by mr Giles yours of Jan. 27. and am well pleased with the indications of republicanism in our assembly. their law respecting the printer is a good one. I only wish they would give the printing of the laws to one & journals to another. this would secure two, as each portion of the business would be object enough to a printer, and two places in their gift would keep within...
I omitted in mine of yesterday to advert to the remark in yours relating to Genl. Ripley. If he be retained in service preferably to the pretensions of others, he ought doubtless to be breveted. And should he be postponed, that compliment if liable to no objection not known to me, would alleviate his disappointment. In the latter view, it ought to be understood however that the brevet is not a...
Your favor of June 17. has been duly recieved. I am endeavoring to get for you the lodgings Langdon had. But the landlord is doubtful whether he will let them at all. If he will not, I will endeavor to do the best I can. I can accomodate you myself with a stable and coach house without any expence, as I happen to have two on hand: and indeed in my new one I have had stalls enough prepared for...
Mr. Morris who was employed for several years on a confidential Mission to Spain, observes to me that in executing the trust, he incurred expences, particularly in being transferred from Cadiz to Madrid, and during his residence at the latter place, which in the then circumstances of Spain were great beyond foresight, and moreover in providing a Clerk for whose services he had occasion: and he...
Your several letters to Apl. 19. have been recd. The dawn of your negociations has given much pleasure and much expectation . We wait with anxiety your next despatches, which will probably disclose the precise prospect if not the result in form . The crisis as seen here has been auspicious and I am persuaded that you will have seised [ sic ] and pushed its advantages . The purchase of the
By Capt. Brewster, who, with his son and two Pilots, are about to proceed to England as Witnesses in the case of Capt. Whitby, I send you copies of several of my last letters. He will also be the bearer of a letter from the Collector of New York stating the advances made to the Witnesses respectively. Two other Witnesses are expected to sail from Philada., to whom it was found necessary to...
Mr. Ths. Lehré of S. C. is a candidate for the vacant Collectorship of Charleston, and writes that I shd bear some testimony to you in favor of his pretensions. Not having any personal knowlege of him this can relate only to his political sentiments and conduct as they were from time to time communi[ca]ted to me, and to the general standing which I have understood him to possess with his...
Since we left the university I have recd. the letter from Mr. Gallatin, of which the inclosed is a copy. It gives no prospect of a supply for the vacant chair from that quarter, and I have no additional information from any other. A few lines from Mr. Ringold as he passed thro’ the neighbourhood, mentioned that you had suffered a sharp attack after you reached home not unlike mine, but was,...
I send you the paper which Mrs. De Talleyrand & De Beaumez were to hand you through me. You observe they have foreborne to insert any but females. The object, I am sure, will interest your good offices, as far as shall consist with your situation & with propriety. I confirm to you what they say on the subject of money. With good wishes, consideration, & esteem I remain, Sir Your obed ser ALS ,...
In the joint letter from you & Mr. P. of October a project on impressments is referred to which does not appear. I forget what passed with you in conversation on the subject. You will oblige me by dropping me the state of the case, and if there be any document in your hands that you will be so good as to forward it or a copy of it. It can if necessary be thrown into the mass which will be...
The moment, my dear friend, is come which I was so anxious should happen in your time. the office of P.M. in Richm d is become vacant by the long expected death of the incumbent, and I cannot omit to urge my former suits in behalf of Col o Peyton. in the several cases in which I have been forced to hand to you the names of sollicitants for office I never suffered my wishes to go beyond the...
Mr. Craven, who was here at the receipt of your favor of the 15th. & will probably be here a week longer, desires me to inform you that he communicates by this day’s post, your terms to mr Darrelle, and that he is thoroughly persuaded he will accede to them. he is very anxious you should retain the lands for Darrelle, who is his father in law, and whose removal into the neighborhood is...
Since mine of the 26th. Callender is arrived here. he did not call on me; but understanding he was in distress, I sent Capt Lewis to him with 50. D. to inform him we were making some enquiries as to his fine which would take a little time, & lest he suffer in the mean time I had sent him &c. his language to Capt Lewis was very high toned. he intimated that he was in possession of things which...
A confidential opportunity offering by mr Baring, I can venture to write to you with less reserve than common conveyances admit. the 150 livres you paid to mr Chas for me shall be replaced in the hands of mr Lewis your manager here, with thanks to you for honoring what you had no reason to doubt was a just claim on me. I do not know him personally or any otherwise than by his history of our...
I thank you for the frank and friendly communication in your kind letter of the 19th. of the Arrangement for the Negotiations at St. Petersburg. I have no Objection to make to it. The Points of Rank and Ettiquette, of Such vast acknowledged importance in Europe, and felt by every Man in America to be more consequence here than any Man will acknowledge; are So unsettled in this Country, that I...
I some days ago made a remittance to mr Jefferson with a request that he would pay you the amount of Jones’s bill with the costs and other disbursements. for these last he would have to ask your information as they were not stated on the bill. with this, be so good as to accept my thanks for the attention you have paid to this commission, and the trouble it has given you. from Your letter of...
The bearer hereof is mr Whitney of Connecticut a mechanic of the first order of ingenuity, who invented the Cotton gin now so much used to the South; he is at the head of a considerable gun manufactory in Connecticut, and furnishes the US. with muskets, undoubtedly the best they recieve. he has invented moulds & machines for making all the peices of his locks so exactly equal, that take 100...
Your favor of the 9th. did not come to hand till the evening before the last. From a communication just had with my nephew, I find that he is anxious not to lose the chance of the Secretariship to the Board under the Treaty, and seems to be encouraged in his hopes by his friend Col: Barbour. It will be agreeable to him therefore, if not objectionable, that his appt. to the other place you...
I received the day before yesterday your favour of the 26th July. I had previously recd. the Report on the proposed change of the 9th. art: of the Confederation, transmitted by Col: Grayson, and in my answer to him offered such ideas on the subject as then occurred. I still think the probability of success or failure ought to weigh much with Congress in every recommendation to the States; of...
Mr. Jesse B Harrison of Lynchburg offers himself as Successor to Mr. Long in the professorship of Antient Languages; and if satisfied, by the concuring opinions of the Visitors, separately expressed that he may expect the appointment, intends to embark immediately for Germany at his own expence, in order to avail himself of the peculiar opportunities there afforded for improving his...
The state of the Electoral poll as published affords such strong presumptive evidence of the result, that altho’ no official notice may arrive, I shall set out in due time for Richmond. Mrs. Madison will avail herself of the occasion to make a short visit to Mrs. Monroe. In order to guard agst. casualties of the weather, & for the advantage of being rather early on the ground, we shall...
The present is merely to inclose to you a letter I have received from a lady who is distressed on account of her son at Elizabeth town, and to pray you to enquire into his situation and either write it to me, or get him to write to his mother and to forward it through you. I wish you happiness at all times being with very sincere esteem Dr. Sir, Your affectionate friend & Servt., RC ( NN );...
Our Visitors determined to make a report to the Governor as their patron, of the progress and prospects of our College , with a view to place it before the legislature for their aid or adoption. I have this moment, and at this place prepared such a report, but as it will be some time before it can go the rounds of all the visitors for their signatures, your greater distance requires the...
I return the letter from Mr. Wirt, and the letter & paper from Mr. Mitchell. You cannot do better than pursue the result of your consultation with Mr. Rush on the subject. He is acquainted with what passed between me & Judge Tucker & Mr. Wirt. It seems proper that Mr. Mitchell be instructed to send if he be permitted the persons under his care, to the U.S. We are bound by respect to the laws,...
Your favor of the 16th. came to hand yesterday, & by this day’s post I inclose you a draught on Gibson & Jefferson for 50. D. payable to Majr. Wm. Duval to whom you will be so good as to explain that it is for Genl. Lawson . I now write an answer to the Genl. but will keep it back a couple of days as it furnishes me in that way an excuse for having previously placed the money in Duval’s hands....
The doubt which you suggest as to our jurisdiction over the case of the grand jury v. Cabell, had occurred to me, and naturally occurs on first view of the question. But I knew that to send the petition to the H. of Represent. in Congress, would make bad worse, that a majority of that house would pass a vote of approbation. On examination of the question too it appeared to me that we could...
It had escaped my recollection till this moment that you had desired me to send you the copy of La Harpe’s journal. you will find bound up with it some Extracts from it which I had made because bearing immediately on the question of right, and a duplicate copy of the letters of Cevallos Salcedo & Herrera . if your office possesses the original, as I am sure it does, I will be glad to have this...
Another Mail has arrived without a word from or of Mr. C. I inclose a letter from J.P.T. which gives a better glimpse from London, than has otherwise appeard. I inclose another from Mr. C. which was not followed by the supplement contingently promised. The contents are inconsistent with the ordinary calculation of dates and events. But in the present period, nothing is incredible that is not...
Your favor of came duly to hand, accompanied by the papers now returned, and by a note on the correspondence communicated to Congs. It appears that in most instances the parts allotted for publication coincide with your wishes. In the excepted instances, an attempt will be made, to have the confidential parts, conformed also to these, by being included in the publication ordered by the H. of...
Letter not found. 4 February 1786. Recorded in “Letters from J. M. [to] Mr. Monroe” (DLC) as “unimportant.”
I recieved your letter at dusk, when no candle was lighted, & not suspecting your so sudden departure told the servant not to wait for an—answer, & that I would send it. I hope I shall be able to send the papers in the morning before you will have departed. The letter of Lewis shews that Barron is a most unprincipled men, and the sentence of the court shews him unworthy of any military trust....
Yours of the 12th. came to hand yesterday. we shall be happy to recieve mrs Monroe & yourself again among us, but as you speak of your coming with some uncertainty, I prepare the present for the post. Craven has been gone back some time. he was anxious to get his father in [law’s] purchase of you concluded. he said indeed he would have taken on him[self to] conclude it, but that mr Darrelle...
Your last letter bears date on the 12th. February. Those of 18 Octr. 11. 26 Novr. 11. 23 Decr. 28 Jany. & 12 Feby. last had been previously received. Congress adjourned the evening before the last. The Gazettes before and herewith sent will give you a general view of the proceedings of the Session. As soon as the laws passed shall be ready, a compleat copy of them will be forwarded. For the...