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§ To John Armstrong, George W. Erving, and James Monroe. 4 December 1805, Department of State. “Inclosed is a copy of the message of the President yesterday delivered to the two houses of Congress. The importance of its contents makes it desireable that you should receive it with as little delay as possible.” Letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 59, IM , vol. 6); RC ( DLC : Curry Autograph Collection);...
[ Paris, 4 July 1785 . Entry in SJL reads: “Madison, Monroe & Hardy. Letters of recommendation for W. T. Franklin.” None of these letters has been found; but see TJ to Monroe, 5 July 1785 .]
The bearer hereof, Mr. Franklin , being about to return to America, I take the liberty of presenting him to your acquaintance. Your esteem for the character of his grandfather would have procured him a favourable reception with you: and it cannot but increase your desire to know him, when you shall be assured that his worth and qualifications give him a personal claim to it. I have taken the...
[ Annapolis, April? 1784 .] Requesting “the favor of their Company to dine with them @ 4 oClock.” RC ( DLC ); without date or place; addressed: “Honble M[ess]rs. Jefferson & Monroe.” The blank verso of this note was subsequently used by TJ in his draft of an additional instruction to the Committee of States and therefore must have been received before 26 Apr. 1784; see Vol. 6: 529, note.
A month having elapsed since the departure of M Monroe it may be presumed that by the time this reaches you communications will have passed with the French government sufficiently explaining its views towards the United States and preparing the way for the ulterior instructions which the President thinks proper should now be given. In case a conventional arrangement with France should have...
You will herewith receive a Commission and letters of Credence, one of you as Minister Plenipotentiary, the other as Minister Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, to treat with the Government of the French Republic, on the Subject of the Mississipi, and the Territories Eastward thereof, and without the limits of the United States. The object in view is to procure by just and satisfactory...
The reasonable and friendly views with which you have been instructed by the President to enter into negociations with the French Government justify him in expecting from them an issue favorable to the tranquillity and to the useful relations between the two Countries. It is not forgotten however that these views, instead of being reciprocal, may find, on the part of France, a temper adverse...
Know Ye, That reposing special Trust and confidence in the Integrity, Prudence and Abilities of James Monroe, late Governor of the State of Virginia, and of Robert R. Livingston, at present the Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States to the French Republic, I have nominated, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, appointed them the said Robert R. Livingston to be Minister...
Since my last which was of April 18th the tenor of our information from France and Great Britain renders a war between those powers in the highest degree probable. It may be inferred at the same time from the information given by Mr. Livingston and Mr. King that the importance of the United States is rising fast in the estimation both of the French and British cabinets and that Louisiana is as...
Your dispatches including the Treaty and two Conventions signed with a French Plenipotentiary on the 30th of April were safely delivered on the 14th by Mr. Hughes, to whose care you had committed them. In concurring with the disposition of the French Government to treat for the whole of Louisiana although the western part of it was not embraced by your powers you were justified by the solid...
Although I am very sensible that any request of mine will have but little weight with the President I think it my duty to request you to inform him that I am in possession of property to a large amount belonging to Citizens of the U. States & that, as it is impossible to realize its value at the present moment, I fear it will be difficult to remit it in safety without some naval force to...
I arrived here on My way to upper and lower Sandusky ordered there by Major J.C. Bartlett D.Q. Master General who entered on the duties of his office in the place of Col Morrison this day —at 6. p.m. on reaching this met the post Rider, direct from upper Sandusky who presented Governor Meigs (who is also here with two hundred Men going on to Sandusky) with a letter from General Harrison—that...
I this moment only receive your letter of the 17th. Mine by this mail renders nothing more necessary in answer to it. I understand Mr. Crawford is so far recovered that he hopes to be on the road for Washington in a few days. His weakness I presume will make his journey very slow. Sending this with some other letters by an extra messenger who will hardly reach the P. Office in time I add only...
I did not receive your favor of Sepr. 2d. the only one yet come to hand, till yesterday. The account of your arrival and reception had some time ago found its way to us thro’ the English Gazettes. The language of your address to the Convention was certainly very grating to the ears of many here; and would no doubt have employed the tongues and the pens too of some of them, if external as well...
Books sold to Colo. Monroe s Chastellux Felicité publique. 2.v. 13. 6  Helvetius de l’homme. 3.v. 13. 6. Gravina l’esprit des loix Romaines 3.v. 19. Barbeyrac discours. 2.v. 10. Vicat Droit naturel. 2.v. 15. Felice. droit de la nature 18. Certitude de Mahometisme 13. 6 Oeuvres de Mably. 4.v.
Your favor of the 9th . came to hand yesterday and relieved us from the fear that sickness or some other accident had detained you. I am very particularly obliged to you for the attention you have been so good as to pay to my accomodation; several circumstances had prevented my taking measures for this purpose so early as I wished. I had ultimately relied on Mr. Carrol, who left this place two...
I thank you for the copy of your Message. The moderation it breathes towards Spain will be approved generally at present, & universally hereafter. The time is passed when this policy could be ascribed to any other than its true motive. The present standing of the U.S. will secure to it a just interpretation every where. It is very satisfactory to learn that the greatest powers in Europe are...
In a letter from Dupont de Nemours to me is the following passage. ‘Houdon a laissé en Amerique un trés beau buste de Benjamin Franklin, lequel est actuellement chez moi. ce buste en marbre vaut cent louis de notre monnaie, environ 480. D. rien n’est plus convenable a la nation que de la placer dans votre Capitole &c. et Houdon, a qui la Virginie doit encore mille ecus sur la statue de...
I have just recd. yours of the 26. and return the projected answer to Adml. Cochrane, with a few pencilled alterations, which you will perceive the Scope of; and adopt, or remodify as you may think best. The last one is intended to obviate the apparent inconsistency occurring to you. The only ground on which the B. Govt. could properly, or prudently call the attention of this to the affair in...
I now return the letters to you from Mr. Purviance & Cambaceres, with an acknowledgment of those in which they were inclosed. The papers last recd. from you in relation to Mr. Skipwith will be of use in establishing one or two material points. His case has been a hard one, but it may be questioned whether he be well founded in the extent of his claims for interest & Agency for Claims. The...
upon the 23d of Feb’ry mr Adams addrest a Letter to you, and inclosed a private Letter from my Son at St Petersburgh to me, requesting a return of it by the next Mail. as the Letter has not been received I presume in the multiplicity of buisness, It has been forgotten. You will oblige me by sending it, and at the same time do me the favour to forwarding the packet which accompanies this Letter...
I am the more indebted for your friendly letter of Feb. 13. mentioning the charges against Cathalan , because a long, an intimate and personal acquaintance with him interest my wishes for his welfare, so far as justice permits; while I certainly should not be his advocate if guilty of serious delinquencies of office. but I observe that all these complaints have originated since mr Fitch began...
The views with which the U.S. entered into the war, necessarily dispose them to a just peace. The promptitude with which the mediation of H.I.M. was accepted and the purpose of sending ministers to St.P. without waiting for the determination of G.B. is proof of this disposition. An armistice as sparing an effusion of blood, & as contemplating an auspicious result to the mediation, can not...
Your favor of Jany. 26. came duly to hand. The information I wish to be obtained from Genl. Jackson is 1st. What was the form & dates of the appointments of Brigadier, and of Brevet Major General, accepted by him in his letter of June 8th. 1814. to the Secy. of war; and what the date of the Secretary’s letter inclosing the appointments. The term “form” refers to the distinction between...
The following suits were put into the hands of Mr. N. Pope in 1791. to wit  £  s d against Lewis & Woodson on bond. principal & interest to Sep. 30. 1791. were 192– 12– 9 1/2 against Woodson on his Note.   do.     to do.   7– 14– 2 against Lewis on Account of rent. balance & interest to Sep. 30. 1791  86–  7– 0 1/2 286– 14– 0 Out of these monies when recovered the following orders were given
As you were pleased to say to our Senior, at the interview he had the honor to have with you on Saturday last, that you would take into consideration, and give an early answer, to the proposal he made to you, of trying our claim on the United States, for the ship Allegany and our part of her Cargo, lost at Gilbraltar in their service, in the form of an amicable Suit, in one of the Courts of...
Yours of the 1st. inst: came on slowly. I return the letter from Mr. Ingersoll whose continued drudgery in his profession, would be to be lamented, if his release from it would ensure such fruits of his literary pen, as one of his discourses to the Society, Philosophical (I think), which contained the ablest & most valuable Tableau of the Condition of the U. S. that has been published. I...
At the request of Mr. R. Harrison, who is well acquainted with the Bearer Mr. James H. Hooe, I introduce this Gentleman to your civilities. He is charged with some business interesting to a friend of Mr. Harrison, which it is supposed may be aided by your advice, and perhaps claim your official attention. These considerations will more than apologize for the liberty I have taken, and will...
It would seem mighty idle for me to inform you formally of the merits of Col o Trumbull as a painter or as a man. yet he asks my notice of him to my friends , as if his talents had not already distinguished him in their notice. on the continent of Europe his genius was placed much above West ’s. Baron Grimm , the arbiter of taste at Paris in my day, expressed to me often his decided & high...
Yours of the 21st. is just recd. I am sorry to learn that your health continues to fluctuate, as well as that you are detained from your intended trip, which would doubtless aid it, by the causes you mention. I hope the next information will be more favorable. The omission to sanction the appt. of Commodore Lewis ⟨pr⟩oceeded from a misapprehension of your letter. I thought, on a hasty […] my...
The small pox at Richmond has cut off the communication by post to or through that place. I should have thought it Davies’s duty to have removed his office a little way out of town, that the communication might not have been interrupted. Instead of that it is said the inhabitants of the country are to be prosecuted because they thought it better to refuse a passage to his post riders than take...
The mail is closing just as the inclosed is put into my hands. tomorrow we shall write to you fully. Adieu. PrC ( MHi ); at foot of text: “James Monroe”; endorsed by TJ in ink on verso. Enclosure: Resolutions of the Senate, 12 Jan., agreeing to Monroe’s appointments as minister extraordinary and plenipotentiary to France and Spain (see TJ to Monroe, 13 Jan. ; JEP Journal of the Executive...
§ Alexander Moore to James Monroe. 28 January 1814, Washington. “At the request of several persons who are very much interested in the appointment of a Judge of the Orphans Court for Alexandria County, I take the liberty of calling your attention to that subject. There is at this time a number of administrations to be granted which cannot be effected until the appointment takes place. It was...
I have recd. a letter from H. Lee dated Nashville Aug. 24. stating that he had corresponded with Genl. Armstrong on the subject of the provisional order to Genl. Jackson of July 18. 1814, authorizing him on certain conditions to take possession of Pensacola; which order was not recd. by the General till on or about the 14th. of March 1815; and then open, and the envelope without postmark; and...
I have the honor to recommend to your attention the case of Messrs Francis and Charles Bradbury, explained in the enclosed document, in order that you may aid them in regaining the proceeds of the sales of their property at Buenos Ayres, if the suggestion of their having passed into the hands of the British, at the capture of the place should prove to be well founded. I have the honor &c. DNA...
I know nothing of the subject of this petition, but the preceding signers are of the most respectable of our county and entitled to the highest degree of credit in whatever they affirm. DNA : RG 59—PPR—Presidential Pardons and Remissions.
§ Daniel D. Tompkins to James Monroe. 5 June 1815, New York. “A. Clark Esqr, who visits Washington with Mrs. Clark, for the benefit of her health, wishes to be made Known to the President and yourself. He is at present Clerk of the house of representatives of this State and was formerly my private Secretary. He is a young gentleman of good education & standing & I hope you will pardon the...
I ascribe to the heat of the weather my not having yet had the pleasure of your promised visit. We hope when the obstacle is removed that we shall have the gratification increased by the company of Mrs. Monroe. Among the papers now forwarded is another note from Mr. F. His late ones breathe a spirit which it is difficult to account for without the painful supposition that he believes it not...
14 December 1794, Philadelphia. Introduces Robert S. Van Rensselaer, who “proposes to make a tour through some parts of Europe, and wishes for an opportunity of being made known to you.” RC ( MH ). 1 p. Addressed by JM to Monroe, “Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States / Paris,” and marked “Mr. Van Renselaer.” Calendared as letter not found in PJM Robert J. Brugger et al., eds., The...
Since writing my letter of yesterday it has occurred to me that the stile in which, in my letters to you, I have spoken of the mass of falsehood & calumny afloat in our country, & the impossibility of believing what is beyond the evidence of our own senses, is too strong to be published. such a fellow as Cobbet, abusing us as a nation, will quote this as testimony of it given by ourselves. the...
I have received from Mr. Graham the Communications to you from Algiers, which being copies I do not return. The course before us is obvious. The ground taken in the last instructions, must be adhered to. The Dey must distinctly understand, that altho’ we prefer peace we are prepared for War; and will make no change in the late treaty, nor concession of any sort to avoid it. It appears from...
Letter not found. Ca. 17 September 1792. Acknowledged in Monroe to JM, 18 Sept. 1792 . Encloses a draft of the article that Monroe revised and Dunlap’s Am. Daily Advertiser published on 22 Sept. Also encloses excerpts from Jefferson’s correspondence that were quoted in this article (see Monroe to JM, 9 Oct. 1792 ).
I have recd. from Mr. Jefferson your letter to him, with the correspondence between Mr. Canning & Mr. Rush, sent for his and my perusal, and our opinions on the subject of it. From the disclosures of Mr. Canning it appears, as was otherwise to be inferred, that the success of France agst. Spain would be followed by attempts of the Holy Alliance to reduce the revolutionized colonies of the...
§ Richard Söderström to James Monroe. 21 December 1813, Washington. “Ever desirous of conforming myself to the regulations, which the President of the United States may be pleased to prescribe for the exercise of my official function, I have attended with due defference to your Verbel Communication of yesterday, Intimating that the President requir’d the revocation, within a Reasonable time,...
In my letter of March l8th. to the joint Commission, it was signified that in a Conventional arrangement on the subject of Boundaries, it would be inconsistent with the views of the President, to open any part of Louisiana, to a British trade with the Indians. From the evident solicitude of the British Government on this point, it is highly probable that the determination of the President will...
I recieved last night a letter from M. Cathalan inclosing that for the Secretary of the Navy which I now forward to you. it was left open for my perusal with a request to stick a wafer in it & to forward it. the wish that I should know it’s contents, and the trouble of copying so long a dispatch are I suppose his apology for this little irregularity. it proves the intrigues of Fitch , the...
I have recd. your favor of the 9th. April, which gave us the first notice of your arrival in France. The moment of it, according to the posture of things between the two great rival powers as represented by our Ministers, must have been peculiarly critical. The information cited from King in my public letter marks the source from which the British cabinet begins to take counsel on subjects...
Your’s of the 16th. came to hand yesterday morning, and in the course of the day it happened that Craven arrived here, so that I had an opportunity of enquiring into what you wished to know. He says that Darrelle failed altogether in the sale of his land so that he was unable to purchase. I asked him if some accomodation as to time, which might give him time to sell, might not induce him to...
Your letter of the 10 th has been duly recieved. the objects of our contest being thus entirely changed by England , we must prepare for interminable war. to this end we should put our house in order, by providing men and money to indefinite extent. the former may be done by classing our militia, and assigning each class to the description of duties for which it is fit. it is nonsense to talk...
Your last favor was of Mar. 11. The language of Mr. Fox and Mr. Gray, raises very favorable prospects; but I am aware of the difficulties that may occur in settling details as well as in defining general principles. Other members of the Cabinet may also not concur in the liberal dispositions of those gentlemen. This goes by Mr. P. who is charged with the joint commission, and instructions...