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I this moment only receive your letter of the 17th. Mine by this mail renders nothing more necessary in answer to it. I understand Mr. Crawford is so far recovered that he hopes to be on the road for Washington in a few days. His weakness I presume will make his journey very slow. Sending this with some other letters by an extra messenger who will hardly reach the P. Office in time I add only...
I thank you for the copy of your Message. The moderation it breathes towards Spain will be approved generally at present, & universally hereafter. The time is passed when this policy could be ascribed to any other than its true motive. The present standing of the U.S. will secure to it a just interpretation every where. It is very satisfactory to learn that the greatest powers in Europe are...
Inferring from the silence of the Newspapers, since they announced your appointment as a visitor of the University, that your answer did not require a replacing one, I take for granted that you will be with your colleagues at the legal place & period. Allow me to count on your being thus far on your way in time for us to proceed hence together. I propose to set out on saturday after next, and...
Tho’ sorry to trouble you so often I must ask the further favor of you to let me have from the War Dept. a copy of Genl. Harrison’s letter of Resignation. It bears date the eleventh of May 1814. Also a copy of the letter of the Secy. of war acknowledging its receipt; date May 24. Also copy of the Secy’ letter to Harrison of May 28. accepting the Resignation of Harrison. Yrs. always RC ( DLC :...
To my requests the day before yesterday I forgot to add that of a Copy of As letter to Harrison acknowledging the receipt of his Resignation; the date only being formerly asked for & sent in your last. Yours RC ( DLC : Monroe Papers); draft ( DLC ). RC docketed by Monroe. Minor differences between the copies have not been noted.
Your favor of Jany. 26. came duly to hand. The information I wish to be obtained from Genl. Jackson is 1st. What was the form & dates of the appointments of Brigadier, and of Brevet Major General, accepted by him in his letter of June 8th. 1814. to the Secy. of war; and what the date of the Secretary’s letter inclosing the appointments. The term “form” refers to the distinction between...
Yours of the 1st. inst: came on slowly. I return the letter from Mr. Ingersoll whose continued drudgery in his profession, would be to be lamented, if his release from it would ensure such fruits of his literary pen, as one of his discourses to the Society, Philosophical (I think), which contained the ablest & most valuable Tableau of the Condition of the U. S. that has been published. I...
I have recd. a letter from H. Lee dated Nashville Aug. 24. stating that he had corresponded with Genl. Armstrong on the subject of the provisional order to Genl. Jackson of July 18. 1814, authorizing him on certain conditions to take possession of Pensacola; which order was not recd. by the General till on or about the 14th. of March 1815; and then open, and the envelope without postmark; and...
The inclosed is of little consequence, but you will see that it ought to have been addressed to you. Dr. Eustis & his lady having given us a call, it was agreed that he & myself shd. make a short visit to Mr. Jefferson of whose state of health, I had never been able to get any precise information. We found him substantially restored from his indisposition, with good appetite, and in the daily...
A most distressing picture has been presented to me of the condition of Mr. Cathcart and his numerous family, in the hope that as his official services which have had such a termination, were rendered whilst the Executive administration was in my hands, I might be induced to say something in his behalf. It is impossible to learn his actual distress and alarming prospects without sympathy; but...
In the hurry of acknowledging yours of Ocr. 17. recd. at the last moment of the opportunity for the post office, I did not advert to the passage relating to enquiries to be made of Genl. Jackson. I hope you have not delayed your intended letter to him on that account. I should suppose it might be quite proper to ask from him copies of the documents appointing him Brigadier or Majr. General by...
I have recd. yours of the 7th. You will not doubt that our sympathies have been fully with you during the afflictions which have befallen you. I think you have done well in chusing your present situation, & for the reasons you express. I hope you will experience from it all the improvement which your health needs, and every advantage promised by it. My fear is that the Winter may be too rude...
I have rcd. your favor of the 3d. I am much obliged by the kind manner in which you speak of my Nephew. I hope you will always consider expressions of my good will in such cases as perfectly subordinate to public considerations, and superi[o]r pretensions. In the present case I am not sure that the appt. of my nephew to the place in question ought to be desired even by himself, unless Col:...
A letter from Mrs. Dallas has just come under my eye, by which I find she is subsisting on very scanty resources, and is under impressions that two of her sons particularly, are not as well off as the public services of their father, and their own personal worth had promised. The elder one belonging to the Navy has, it seems, been a considerabl⟨e⟩ time without a ship. The other, George, tho’...
Your favor of the 18th. was handed to me by your servant, at a moment & place which did not permit me to acknowlege it by him. We regretted very much the circumstances which deprived us of the expected pleasure of seeing you all on your way to Washington. I inclose the copy of your letter to Gen: Jackson. Your reasonings on the singular step taken by him can scarcely fail to convince him of...
I have duly recd. yours of the 27th. Ulto. I am very sorry that I shall not be able to have the pleasure of joining you at the Meeting of the Visitors. We must await therefore that of seeing you & Mrs. M. on your way to Washington; and hope you will set out in time to spare us some days. The communications from Mr. Rush are very interesting. G. B. seems so anxious to secure the general trade...
Yours of Feby. 23. was not recd. before the last mail tho’ having the Aldie post mark on the day of its date. Whether it was not duly forwarded, or was so long overlooked at the office here is not known. The latter was probably the case. We hope the agreeable information you gave of Mrs. Monroe’s convalescence has been justified by, her entire recovery. I need not now say that I recd. at the...
Among the names which are presented for consideration in filling the vacant Chair in the University is that of Thomas H. Levins, now of New York, formerly of the District of Columbia, where he was Professor of Mathematics in the College. Letters in his favor are recd. from Mr. Calhoun, Genl. McComb, and Mr. A. H. Powell who I suppose is the present Member of Congress of that name. Whatever be...
I have recd. from Mr. Lear engaged in settling the accounts of General Hull, a request of what I may recollect on the question, whether there was a stipulation or understanding, that the General was to receive his salary as Governour, as well as his military pay. I have simply answered that my memory does not furnish any evidence which ought to influence the decision of the question. As the...
I recd. yours of the 10th. with a full sense of your kindness in taking so much interest in my health. Subsequent to your call on me, I had a return of fever which reduced me to a state of greater weakness than I had before experienced. For several weeks passed, have been on the recovery in strength as well as health; and if no relapse takes place, I may be able to give my attendance at...
I recd by the last mail a letter from J. H. Causten, accompanied by a huge volume of Documents, and a stout pamphlet of arguments, with a printed letter to him from Mr. Pickering, on the mercantile claims agst. France and the release of her from them by the U.S. All these articles have been doubtless sent to you also, as I am requested by Mr. C. to forward the inclosed Certificate of Agency,...
Mr. Morris who was employed for several years on a confidential Mission to Spain, observes to me that in executing the trust, he incurred expences, particularly in being transferred from Cadiz to Madrid, and during his residence at the latter place, which in the then circumstances of Spain were great beyond foresight, and moreover in providing a Clerk for whose services he had occasion: and he...
Mr. Ths. Lehré of S. C. is a candidate for the vacant Collectorship of Charleston, and writes that I shd bear some testimony to you in favor of his pretensions. Not having any personal knowlege of him this can relate only to his political sentiments and conduct as they were from time to time communi[ca]ted to me, and to the general standing which I have understood him to possess with his...
Since we left the university I have recd. the letter from Mr. Gallatin, of which the inclosed is a copy. It gives no prospect of a supply for the vacant chair from that quarter, and I have no additional information from any other. A few lines from Mr. Ringold as he passed thro’ the neighbourhood, mentioned that you had suffered a sharp attack after you reached home not unlike mine, but was,...
Your favor of the 9th. did not come to hand till the evening before the last. From a communication just had with my nephew, I find that he is anxious not to lose the chance of the Secretariship to the Board under the Treaty, and seems to be encouraged in his hopes by his friend Col: Barbour. It will be agreeable to him therefore, if not objectionable, that his appt. to the other place you...
Mr. Jesse B Harrison of Lynchburg offers himself as Successor to Mr. Long in the professorship of Antient Languages; and if satisfied, by the concuring opinions of the Visitors, separately expressed that he may expect the appointment, intends to embark immediately for Germany at his own expence, in order to avail himself of the peculiar opportunities there afforded for improving his...
I recd. by the last mail yours of the 18th. You were not more surprized than I had a right to be at seeing our names on the Electoral Ticket. After my letter to you, which you made known to Col. Mercer, I wrote to Mr. Cabell in the most decided terms, and he informs me he made the proper use of it. I have a letter from Col. Mercer also, corresponding doubtless with his to you. The awkwardness...
On my arrival here last evening I learnt that you had reachd home the day before yesterday. I am sorry I could not have the pleasure of seeing you at Montpellier on your way, And the regret is increased by the circumstances which prevent me from making the detour necessary to call on you. I left my mother much indisposed, and my sister Rose who was on a visit to her critically ill; and having...
I find that Mr. H. Carroll, son of Charles Carroll, who brought over the Treaty of Ghent, is very desirous, as is his father, that he should be appointed to a land office on the Missouri. You are so well acquainted with the worth of the latter both as a man and a patriot, and probably also with the character of the son, that I ought perhaps on that account alone to forbear saying a word on the...
A very near friend of Mr. Stone of Fredg. who is not ignorant of my having on former occasions testified my regard for his worth & his welfare, is very anxious that I should bring him again to your view. It seems that Mr. Stone has turned his thoughts & his hopes to the vacancy lately produced by the death of Col. Freeman; and the application to me has a more immediate reference to that...
My neighbour & your Acquaintance Mr Richard Taliaferro is desirous that one of his sons should receive a military education at West Point. His progress in the preparatory studies is certified by his present Tutor, and I have myself had a slight opportunity of witnessing that he has some knowledge of Latin. Of his general character I know nothing which is not favorable. If there be no bar to...
I have duly recd. yours of the . I considered the advertisement of your estate in Loudon as an omen that your friends in Virginia were to lose you. It is impossible to gainsay the motives to which you yielded in making N. Y. your residence, tho’ I fear that you will find its climate unsuited to your period of life and the State of your health. I just observe and with much pleasure, that the...
Your two letters of the 13 & 15th. inst came together by the last mail (Sunday evening) too late to be answered by its return on Monday morning. I had recd. the printed circular of Judge Brooke notifying our Electoral nominations, on thursday last, but in the night, and not to be answered by the return Mail, which passes our post office, between 5 & 6 miles distant, by day light. The printed...
Your favors of Mar. 27. & April   came duly to hand. You know already that I submit the recommendations which I can not sometimes decline, in entire subordination to your view of the comparative merits & pretensions before you. I think you perfectly right in not allowing locality to give exclusive claims to offices of general concern. I did not forget the name of Dr. Torrey, when in...
I have recd. your favor of the inclosing papers from the war office. The path I am endeavouring to trace is so dark & tortuous and the official lights left by the Ex-functionary behind him so scanty, that I find it difficult to do justice to the subject. It may be of some use perhaps to understand precisely in what cases usage may have sanctioned “letters of appointment,” instead of regular...
The friends of Mr. Geo: Conway now of Alabama, who are among my near & much respected Neighbours, understanding that an Office of Register of land is become vacant by the election of its holder to Congress, are anxious that I should name him for consideration in appointing a successor. Notwithstanding the claim they think they have to my favorable attention, I yield to their wishes with a...
I thank you for the “Message” put under cover to me. The topics which it embraces are well presented to public attention. None of the Documents have reached us. Those relating to S. America, are I find objects of much curiosity. The inference you draw from them, leaves no doubt however as to their general complexion. I can not learn the precise state of Mr. Jefferson’s convalescence. I fear it...
I have this moment recd. yours of the 25th., and having a casual oppy. to the P. O. this evening shall get an answr. into the mail tomorrow morning. The 10th. of July is as you suppose the day for the Meeting of the Visitors, and I shall look for you here in due time. It ought to be on the 8th. at the latest. I am glad to find you so successful in overcoming the successive attacks on your...
Altho’ your personal and official acquaintance with Mr. J Graham, be well known to me, I can not, on the occasion of my final departure fr⟨om⟩ the public service, satisfy myself, without expressing my sense of his great merit. Mr. Graham, recommended by my knowlege of his public Agency abroad, and of his private virtues, was invited into the Department of State, as the Chief under the Head of...
Yours of the 29th. Ult: was recd. by the last mail. I have not yet heard from Judge Brook, but may perhaps do so by the mail of this evening. The task imposed on us by the Convention is of so delicate a nature, that with their foreknowledge of our purpose, it ought to have been forborne. Your idea of alluding to the advantage of having the experienced Counsel of Ex. Presidts. in trying...
I recd. by yesterdays Mail your favour of the 4th. covering a copy of the Message, and another copy under a blank cover. It presents a most interesting view of the topics selected for it. The observations on the foreign ones are well moulded for the occasion, which is rendered the more delicate and serious by the equivocal indications from the British Cabinet. The reserve of Canning, after his...
I have already apprised you of your mistake of the day for the meeting of the Visitors, which is the 10 th not the 15th. of July. I now wish you to know that we propose to pay a visit to Col: Lindsay, on our way, and on the following day, another. This will make it necessary to set out on Monday the 8th. You must not fail therefore to be here on the saturday or sunday preceding, and as much...
The mail of saturday brought me the Copy of your message. It is a fine landscape of our situation, and can not fail to give pleasure at home, and command respect abroad. The recommendation of the repeal of taxes is happily shaped; so also the introduction of the subject of amending the Constitution. The only questions which occur, relate to the proposed suppression of the establishment at...
Having just recd. a letter stating the circumstances in the extract enclosed, I have thought it not amiss, that they should be known to you. You will be able, or can be enabled to judge how far they merit attention. Some of them, if there be no error in the statement, seem to require & admit of correction. You will observe that the information is from a source professing & I believe truly to...
I have just recd. a letter from Mr. Stone, wch. I inclose as the shortest mode of making his wishes known to you. As you are well acquainted with his character, I need say little on that head. He has been unfortunate in his mercantile career, as I presume you know; but has not suffered I believe in a moral point of view. He is certainly a man of excellent understanding, of gentlemanly manners,...
I have recd. your favor of the 31. ult. The retrospective claim for Newspapers has been made on me, in one instance only, since I was out of office. A printer in Vermont sent me a charge for a weekly paper during my term of 8 years, several years after I was out of office. I answered that I had never subscribed for the paper, and had always supposed it to have been forwarded without pecuniary...
On the rect. of yours of the 5th. I wrote immediately to Mr. Trist, to forward you a copy of the Resolution you wish. Not having yet recd. the circular transcript of the Proceedings of the Session, I could not furnish one myself. I have desired Mr. Trist also to authenticate to you the day for the next meeting of the Visitors; for which my recollection assigns, the first day of October. You...
The mail of saturday brought me your favour of the 16th. The letters inclosed in it are returned. Accept my thanks for the odd vol: Congl. Journals. As I understand the case presented in the other paper inclosed, it turns on the simple question, whether the Senate have a right, in their advice & consent, to vary the date at which, according to the nomination of the President an appointment to...
The day after you left us I recd. a letter from Mr R. B Lee which I inclose. It contains a fuller view of circumstances which it may not be amiss you should understand, than may be otherwise conveyed. I shall simply state in answer that I believe your personal dispositions will be no bar to whatever may be permitted by considerations of a public nature. Be so good as to return the letter under...
I have recd. yours of the 14th. The inclosures leave no desideratum at present observed but the date of the Commission sent to Jackson with the letter of May 28 from the S. War. The date of the Comn. to Jackson inclosed by you, refers to the appt. after ratification by the Senate. May I avail of your kindness to forward the date of the first Comn. from the Authy. of the Presidt. alone. A...