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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Monroe, James" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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A very near friend of Mr. Stone of Fredg. who is not ignorant of my having on former occasions testified my regard for his worth & his welfare, is very anxious that I should bring him again to your view. It seems that Mr. Stone has turned his thoughts & his hopes to the vacancy lately produced by the death of Col. Freeman; and the application to me has a more immediate reference to that...
My neighbour & your Acquaintance Mr Richard Taliaferro is desirous that one of his sons should receive a military education at West Point. His progress in the preparatory studies is certified by his present Tutor, and I have myself had a slight opportunity of witnessing that he has some knowledge of Latin. Of his general character I know nothing which is not favorable. If there be no bar to...
I have duly recd. yours of the . I considered the advertisement of your estate in Loudon as an omen that your friends in Virginia were to lose you. It is impossible to gainsay the motives to which you yielded in making N. Y. your residence, tho’ I fear that you will find its climate unsuited to your period of life and the State of your health. I just observe and with much pleasure, that the...
I have duly rec d your favor of the 12 th inst. and concur in every sentim t you express on the subject of mine of the 2 d they were exactly what I should have said to you myself had our places been changed. my lre was meant only to convey the wishes of the party, and in few cases where circumstances have obliged me to communicate sollicitns have I ever suffered my own wishes to mingle with...
Your two letters of the 13 & 15th. inst came together by the last mail (Sunday evening) too late to be answered by its return on Monday morning. I had recd. the printed circular of Judge Brooke notifying our Electoral nominations, on thursday last, but in the night, and not to be answered by the return Mail, which passes our post office, between 5 & 6 miles distant, by day light. The printed...
Your favors of Mar. 27. & April   came duly to hand. You know already that I submit the recommendations which I can not sometimes decline, in entire subordination to your view of the comparative merits & pretensions before you. I think you perfectly right in not allowing locality to give exclusive claims to offices of general concern. I did not forget the name of Dr. Torrey, when in...
The question presented by the letters you have sent me is the most momentous which has ever been offered to my contemplation since that of independance that made us a nation; this sets our compass, and points the course which we are to steer thro’ the ocean of time opening on our view. and never could we embark on it under circumstances more auspicious. our first and fundamental maxim should...
From the tenderness of friendship, & the weakness of compassion & humanity, I have promised two gentlemen to mention their names to you as Candidates for mr Daltons late office. Captain Tucker and mr Deblois. A friendship of 40 years with the former & of 56 years with the mr Dalton have deeply interested my feelings in behalf of both these gentlemen. But what signifies feelings when I know...
Our University asks a kind attention from you. you doubtless know that our legislature constituted the debt due to them from the US. into a literary fund, for the purposes of education, & that on this fund the University is established, and dependant. at their late session they authorised the Literary board to advance to the University 60,000.D. of the monies still to be recieved from the US....
I have recd. your favor of the inclosing papers from the war office. The path I am endeavouring to trace is so dark & tortuous and the official lights left by the Ex-functionary behind him so scanty, that I find it difficult to do justice to the subject. It may be of some use perhaps to understand precisely in what cases usage may have sanctioned “letters of appointment,” instead of regular...
I should ask leave without scruple to transmit the enclosed letter to you were it not for the foolish compliment in it to my pretended influence, which you know to be unfounded & therefore may pass over with a smile. I do not hesitate to comply with his request, by enclosing a copy of a letter, I wrote to Mr Madison, on the 2nd. February 1813 nor scruple to say that no opinion or sentiment in...
The friends of Mr. Geo: Conway now of Alabama, who are among my near & much respected Neighbours, understanding that an Office of Register of land is become vacant by the election of its holder to Congress, are anxious that I should name him for consideration in appointing a successor. Notwithstanding the claim they think they have to my favorable attention, I yield to their wishes with a...
I thank you for the “Message” put under cover to me. The topics which it embraces are well presented to public attention. None of the Documents have reached us. Those relating to S. America, are I find objects of much curiosity. The inference you draw from them, leaves no doubt however as to their general complexion. I can not learn the precise state of Mr. Jefferson’s convalescence. I fear it...
Yesterday’s mail brought me your favor of the 16th. with a Copy of your message: the only one reaching me; no newspaper containing it having come to hand. The view you have taken of our affairs can not but be well received at home, and increase our importance abroad. The State of our finances is the more gratifying as it so far exceeds the public hopes. I infer from the language of your letter...
I have this moment recd. yours of the 25th., and having a casual oppy. to the P. O. this evening shall get an answr. into the mail tomorrow morning. The 10th. of July is as you suppose the day for the Meeting of the Visitors, and I shall look for you here in due time. It ought to be on the 8th. at the latest. I am glad to find you so successful in overcoming the successive attacks on your...
Finding subsequently, what had not been before attended to that the law had appointed the 1 st day of our Spring & Autumn District court for the stated meetings of the Visitors of the Central College , it is concluded that our meeting should be on the 5 th instead of the 6 th of May (noted in my letter of the 13 th ) and that being the 1 st day of both our County & District courts, the...
The inclosed letter is from a person entirely unknown to me; yet it seems to expect a confidence which prudence could give to a stranger. and as he seems to write under your authority, I take the liberty of confiding my answer to yourself directly, and of returning his paper to you. I do not know that the publication of the papers of the old Congress could be objected to, except such as might...
Yours of the 2d. postmarked the 6th of November came duly to hand. I return the letters & papers inclosed in it. The fact stated to Mr. Ringold by Genl. Jessup, does not concern only or principally the question between Genl. Jackson & Mr. Southard. It belongs to the History of the Campaign and of the Administration; and as such ought to be verified & preserved. The General must of course have...
Altho’ your personal and official acquaintance with Mr. J Graham, be well known to me, I can not, on the occasion of my final departure fr⟨om⟩ the public service, satisfy myself, without expressing my sense of his great merit. Mr. Graham, recommended by my knowlege of his public Agency abroad, and of his private virtues, was invited into the Department of State, as the Chief under the Head of...
The multiplied sollicitations to interest myself with you for applicants for office have been uniformly refused by me . in a few cases only where facts have been within my knolege, I have not been able to refuse stating them as a witness, which I have made a point to do so drily as that you might understand that I took no particular interest in the case. in a conversation with you however, at...
Yours of the 29th. Ult: was recd. by the last mail. I have not yet heard from Judge Brook, but may perhaps do so by the mail of this evening. The task imposed on us by the Convention is of so delicate a nature, that with their foreknowledge of our purpose, it ought to have been forborne. Your idea of alluding to the advantage of having the experienced Counsel of Ex. Presidts. in trying...
I recd. by yesterdays Mail your favour of the 4th. covering a copy of the Message, and another copy under a blank cover. It presents a most interesting view of the topics selected for it. The observations on the foreign ones are well moulded for the occasion, which is rendered the more delicate and serious by the equivocal indications from the British Cabinet. The reserve of Canning, after his...
I am often placed under the dilemma of either alienating my old friends, or of giving you the trouble of reading a letter, and I have had too many proofs of your friendship not to know you will take that trouble to save me from so painful an alternative. I know your difficulties, and after giving my testimony, I pay no attention to the result, leaving that to yourself who alone have a view of...
I have already apprised you of your mistake of the day for the meeting of the Visitors, which is the 10 th not the 15th. of July. I now wish you to know that we propose to pay a visit to Col: Lindsay, on our way, and on the following day, another. This will make it necessary to set out on Monday the 8th. You must not fail therefore to be here on the saturday or sunday preceding, and as much...
The mail of saturday brought me the Copy of your message. It is a fine landscape of our situation, and can not fail to give pleasure at home, and command respect abroad. The recommendation of the repeal of taxes is happily shaped; so also the introduction of the subject of amending the Constitution. The only questions which occur, relate to the proposed suppression of the establishment at...
Having just recd. a letter stating the circumstances in the extract enclosed, I have thought it not amiss, that they should be known to you. You will be able, or can be enabled to judge how far they merit attention. Some of them, if there be no error in the statement, seem to require & admit of correction. You will observe that the information is from a source professing & I believe truly to...
Inferring from the silence of the Newspapers, since they announced your appointment as a visitor of the University, that your answer did not require a replacing one, I take for granted that you will be with your colleagues at the legal place & period. Allow me to count on your being thus far on your way in time for us to proceed hence together. I propose to set out on saturday after next, and...
I have just recd. a letter from Mr. Stone, wch. I inclose as the shortest mode of making his wishes known to you. As you are well acquainted with his character, I need say little on that head. He has been unfortunate in his mercantile career, as I presume you know; but has not suffered I believe in a moral point of view. He is certainly a man of excellent understanding, of gentlemanly manners,...
Your favor of the 3 d is recieved and always with welcome these texts of truth relieve me from the floating falsehoods, of the public papers. I confess to you I am not sorry for the non-ratification of the Spanish treaty. our assent to it has proved our desire to be on friendly terms with Spain; their dissent, the inabecility and malignity of their government towards us. that have placed them...
On the failure of the house of Smith & Buchanan & their connections in Baltimore, Col o Robert Nicholas, who was doing business for them in Leghorn, was of course deprived of that employment. he was at the same time Navy-agent for the US. there. but that not affording a subsistence, he determined to return to his own country. in a letter of Aug. 17. from Poplar Forest, I took the liberty of...
D r Wallis of Fauquier with whom I think you are acquainted seems desirous as his years advance to associate with his medical pursuits or perhaps substitute for them some employment which might relieve or lessen their labors. in what character of business his choice or opportunity might lead him to engage I do not know; but his talents & informs qualify him for a large range and his integrity...
I have duly recieved your two favors of Feb.23. and 27. and am truly sensible of the interest you so kindly take in my affair, and of the encoraging aspect of mr Gouverneur’s letter. all that is necessary for my relief is a succesful sale of our tickets, of which the public papers give good hope. if this is effected, at a reasonable value for what I shall sell, what will remain will leave me...
I have recd. your favor of the 31. ult. The retrospective claim for Newspapers has been made on me, in one instance only, since I was out of office. A printer in Vermont sent me a charge for a weekly paper during my term of 8 years, several years after I was out of office. I answered that I had never subscribed for the paper, and had always supposed it to have been forwarded without pecuniary...
On the rect. of yours of the 5th. I wrote immediately to Mr. Trist, to forward you a copy of the Resolution you wish. Not having yet recd. the circular transcript of the Proceedings of the Session, I could not furnish one myself. I have desired Mr. Trist also to authenticate to you the day for the next meeting of the Visitors; for which my recollection assigns, the first day of October. You...
In the good old English Language of your Virginian and my New England Ancestors, I am right glad to See you in the oldest Plantation, in old Massachusetts, next to Salem, where you will be recd with more Splendor and I hope with equal Cordiallity. MHi : Elizabeth Smith Scrapbook; Smith-Townsend Family Papers.
The mail of saturday brought me your favour of the 16th. The letters inclosed in it are returned. Accept my thanks for the odd vol: Congl. Journals. As I understand the case presented in the other paper inclosed, it turns on the simple question, whether the Senate have a right, in their advice & consent, to vary the date at which, according to the nomination of the President an appointment to...
Tho’ sorry to trouble you so often I must ask the further favor of you to let me have from the War Dept. a copy of Genl. Harrison’s letter of Resignation. It bears date the eleventh of May 1814. Also a copy of the letter of the Secy. of war acknowledging its receipt; date May 24. Also copy of the Secy’ letter to Harrison of May 28. accepting the Resignation of Harrison. Yrs. always RC ( DLC :...
I took the liberty some time last fall of placing mr Duane your notice, should any thing occur adapted to his qualifications, and to his situation, which I understood to be needy in the extreme. his talents and information are certainly great, the services he rendered us when we needed them, and his personal sacrifices and sufferings were signal and efficacious, and left on us a moral duty not...
There will be some cases wherein it will be out of my power to refuse my testimony of worth to applicants for appointment, who may request me to say to you what I know of them. to these solicitations however I shall never yield, nor become troublesome to you but where the claims on me are peculiar. I do not know whether you were acquainted with George Stevenson while he pursued in our...
The day after you left us I recd. a letter from Mr R. B Lee which I inclose. It contains a fuller view of circumstances which it may not be amiss you should understand, than may be otherwise conveyed. I shall simply state in answer that I believe your personal dispositions will be no bar to whatever may be permitted by considerations of a public nature. Be so good as to return the letter under...
Your favor of Jan. 15. is recieved, and I am entirely sensible of the kindness of the motives which suggested the caution it recommends. but I believe what I have done is the only thing I could have done with honor or conscience. mr Gilmer requested me to state a fact which he knew himself, and of which he knew me to be possessed. what use he intended to make of it I knew not, nor had I a...
The use you have made of my letters needed no apology. they were in fact public in their nature. had not my memory so totally left me, I have no doubt I might supply from that source whatever may be defective in the extracts you have made, for altho’ I cannot say I recollect the actual fact, yet from my knolege of myself I am conscious that a compliance with your request to return home was so...
What can I do, my dear friend, with such letters as the inclosed, but forward them to you? and the rather as I presume you must have known the merits of the writer as well as I did: that he was an active Whig and officer in the revolution of 1776. and a firm republican in that of 1800. I reject the numerous applications made to me to be troublesome to you; but now and then comes one which...
You oblige me infinitely, dear Sir, by sending me the Congressional documents in pamphlet form. for as they come out by peice-meal in the newspapers I never read them. and indeed I read no newspapers now but Ritchie ’s, and in that chiefly the advertisements, as being the only truths we can rely on in a newspaper. but in a pamphlet, where we can go thro’ the whole subject when once taken up,...
I shall not waste your time in idle congratulations. you know my joy on the commitment of the helm of our government to your hands. I promised you, when I should have recieved and tried the wines I had ordered from France and Italy , to give you a note of the kinds which I should think worthy of your procurement: and this being the season for ordering them, so that they may come in the mild...
Had I not been poisoned by the mephytic effluvia of blossoms and roses to Such a degree as to deprive me of the Sight of letters and the feeling of a pen: I Should have long Since acknowledged the honour of your obliging letter of the thirteenth of the month. It is perfectly Satisfactory to me, and it ought to be So and I presume will be So to Dr Waterhouse. I am hapy to hear that your heal t...
Had I not been poisoned by the mephytic iffluvia of blossoms and roses to such a degree as to deprive me of the right of letters and the feeling of a pen: I should have long since acknowledged the honour of your obliging letter of the 13th of the month. it is perfectly satisfactory to me and it ought to be so and I presume will be so to Dr Waterhouse. I am happy to hear that your health is...
I have recd. yours of the 14th. The inclosures leave no desideratum at present observed but the date of the Commission sent to Jackson with the letter of May 28 from the S. War. The date of the Comn. to Jackson inclosed by you, refers to the appt. after ratification by the Senate. May I avail of your kindness to forward the date of the first Comn. from the Authy. of the Presidt. alone. A...
I have made it a rule, and have pretty steadfas tly ob observed it, not to permit myself to be used as an instrument to trouble and embarras the government with sollicitations for office. now & then however a case occurs which from pecu lia r circumstances, cannot be declined. still I wish it always to be understood that I ask no departure from what justice, or the necessary rules of...
Yours of the 20th. was duly received. The external affairs of our Country are I perceive, assuming a character more & more delicate & important. The ground on which the Russian communications were met, was certainly well chosen. It is evident that an alienation is going on between G. Britain & the ruling powers on the Continent, & that the former is turning her views to such a connection with...