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Although I am very sensible that any request of mine will have but little weight with the President I think it my duty to request you to inform him that I am in possession of property to a large amount belonging to Citizens of the U. States & that, as it is impossible to realize its value at the present moment, I fear it will be difficult to remit it in safety without some naval force to...
I arrived here on My way to upper and lower Sandusky ordered there by Major J.C. Bartlett D.Q. Master General who entered on the duties of his office in the place of Col Morrison this day —at 6. p.m. on reaching this met the post Rider, direct from upper Sandusky who presented Governor Meigs (who is also here with two hundred Men going on to Sandusky) with a letter from General Harrison—that...
I have just recd. yours of the 26. and return the projected answer to Adml. Cochrane, with a few pencilled alterations, which you will perceive the Scope of; and adopt, or remodify as you may think best. The last one is intended to obviate the apparent inconsistency occurring to you. The only ground on which the B. Govt. could properly, or prudently call the attention of this to the affair in...
upon the 23d of Feb’ry mr Adams addrest a Letter to you, and inclosed a private Letter from my Son at St Petersburgh to me, requesting a return of it by the next Mail. as the Letter has not been received I presume in the multiplicity of buisness, It has been forgotten. You will oblige me by sending it, and at the same time do me the favour to forwarding the packet which accompanies this Letter...
The views with which the U.S. entered into the war, necessarily dispose them to a just peace. The promptitude with which the mediation of H.I.M. was accepted and the purpose of sending ministers to St.P. without waiting for the determination of G.B. is proof of this disposition. An armistice as sparing an effusion of blood, & as contemplating an auspicious result to the mediation, can not...
As you were pleased to say to our Senior, at the interview he had the honor to have with you on Saturday last, that you would take into consideration, and give an early answer, to the proposal he made to you, of trying our claim on the United States, for the ship Allegany and our part of her Cargo, lost at Gilbraltar in their service, in the form of an amicable Suit, in one of the Courts of...
It would seem mighty idle for me to inform you formally of the merits of Col o Trumbull as a painter or as a man. yet he asks my notice of him to my friends , as if his talents had not already distinguished him in their notice. on the continent of Europe his genius was placed much above West ’s. Baron Grimm , the arbiter of taste at Paris in my day, expressed to me often his decided & high...
Yours of the 21st. is just recd. I am sorry to learn that your health continues to fluctuate, as well as that you are detained from your intended trip, which would doubtless aid it, by the causes you mention. I hope the next information will be more favorable. The omission to sanction the appt. of Commodore Lewis ⟨pr⟩oceeded from a misapprehension of your letter. I thought, on a hasty […] my...
§ Alexander Moore to James Monroe. 28 January 1814, Washington. “At the request of several persons who are very much interested in the appointment of a Judge of the Orphans Court for Alexandria County, I take the liberty of calling your attention to that subject. There is at this time a number of administrations to be granted which cannot be effected until the appointment takes place. It was...
§ Daniel D. Tompkins to James Monroe. 5 June 1815, New York. “A. Clark Esqr, who visits Washington with Mrs. Clark, for the benefit of her health, wishes to be made Known to the President and yourself. He is at present Clerk of the house of representatives of this State and was formerly my private Secretary. He is a young gentleman of good education & standing & I hope you will pardon the...
I ascribe to the heat of the weather my not having yet had the pleasure of your promised visit. We hope when the obstacle is removed that we shall have the gratification increased by the company of Mrs. Monroe. Among the papers now forwarded is another note from Mr. F. His late ones breathe a spirit which it is difficult to account for without the painful supposition that he believes it not...
I have received from Mr. Graham the Communications to you from Algiers, which being copies I do not return. The course before us is obvious. The ground taken in the last instructions, must be adhered to. The Dey must distinctly understand, that altho’ we prefer peace we are prepared for War; and will make no change in the late treaty, nor concession of any sort to avoid it. It appears from...
§ Richard Söderström to James Monroe. 21 December 1813, Washington. “Ever desirous of conforming myself to the regulations, which the President of the United States may be pleased to prescribe for the exercise of my official function, I have attended with due defference to your Verbel Communication of yesterday, Intimating that the President requir’d the revocation, within a Reasonable time,...
Your letter of the 10 th has been duly recieved. the objects of our contest being thus entirely changed by England , we must prepare for interminable war. to this end we should put our house in order, by providing men and money to indefinite extent. the former may be done by classing our militia, and assigning each class to the description of duties for which it is fit. it is nonsense to talk...
I have recd. your favors of the 16 & 17. The communication of de Forrest is extremely interesting. The view it gives of the B. policy towards the U.S. is so strikingly just, and so strictly accords with that which has regulated the course of the Executive that it is much to be regretted that his paper is not in a form and is without an authority, to be published. If it had been in the form of...
Still without authentic information from Abroad. The Halifax papers expect Adml. Warren with a naval force, and an offer of peace. It appears that Wellington has gained a victory over Marmont; The extent of it not ascertained. From the West the accounts are that a B & Indn. force amounting to about 600 left Malden after the surrender of Detroit, to attack F. Wayne, & in case of success, to...
The strange jumble of names, places, & titles on the inclosed letter seemed to authorise me to open it, as it does also to forward it to you. yet it properly belongs to neither of us but to the Secretary of the Treasury to whom it makes splendid promises. Our election of electors took place yesterday. a general assurance that there would be no opposition ticket prevented half the voters from...
On perusing your letters to Mr. De Neuville, and Mr. Gallatin, some ideas occurred which induced me to put them on paper for your consideration. Those relating to the first letter are interlined with a pencil. Those relating to the 2d. are partly so, & partly penned on a separate sheet. In the communication to Mr. G. I thought it might be not amiss to suggest the several topics which he may...
I have recd yours covering the letters to Mr. Changuion & Genl. P. My hint as to the pecuniary arrangements for tracing the cases of the Negroes carried off was not meant to limit the amt. necessary for so important an object, but to diminish as much as possible the pecuniary discretion and the vague pretensions of the agents, so much perplexity having been experienced from such sources. I am...
In my last I promised to advise you of the result of the Voninteer Expedition from East Tennessee United with the troops of the United States that march against the Semenolia Indians after a march of near Seven hundred miles with out being retarded by Ice Snow hammocks or Marshes which afforded the Enemy great Oppertunities for advantague we arrived at Paynes Town in the Lochway Settlements...
I inclose you the letters on finance, for perusal. I had not an opportunity of proposing the reading them to the President , there being much company with him. when will the ladies & yourself do us the favor of a visit? RC ( NN : Monroe Papers); dateline at foot of text; addressed: “The Secretary of State”; with endorsement and notes by Monroe on verso. Not recorded in SJL . Enclosures: TJ to...
I this moment receive your favor of the 30th. It gives me much pleasure, that you have so soon got rid of your fever. Whenever you come on you[r] visit to Albemarle, I should be glad to see you, if you could make this a Stage and be reconciled to the little delay it would incur. I can with great conveniency give you a conveyance for the residue of the journey; and if apprized in time wd. have...
I have recd. your letter of the 23d. and learn with much pleasure that you are not disinclined to the Station wch. the one answered by it, presented to your consideration. In discharging the duties of this Station, I am aware that the Functionary must carry into it, a just respect for his own principles, and above all for the dictates of his Conscience. But with the mutual knowledge of our...
I inclose a letter from a M r John Dortic , who being bound to France shortly and to return again, wishes to be the bearer of any dispatches the government may have for that country. of this person I know nothing more than that he brought me lately a packet of seeds from M. Thouin Director of the National garden of France , which he very kindly notified me of from N.Y. and afterwards forwarded...
I have just recd. your favor of this date. I need not express the perfect confidence I feel in the friendly & considerate inducements to your suggestion. But having made definitive preparation for the intended visit; having in no instance omitted it for many years, & the motive being strengthened by the late one recd. by myself, I think the omission, if tested by prudential calculations of a...
Since my last to you , the Directors of the Rivanna company have changed their minds, and instead of going through my canal they have determined to go through the bed of the river; and it being a question between us, whether they or I must build & maintain the lock at my dam, which dam they must have built had I not done it, they have proposed a reference to Arbitrators, to which I gladly...
When I retired from the government, I yielded with too much facility, first to the importunities of my friends to aid them in getting commands in the army and navy, next of mere acquaintances, and lastly of those also of whom I knew nothing. the business became laborious and irksome to myself, and, as I was sufficiently sensible, embarrassing and unpleasant to the government. determined at...
I have recd. yours of the 23d. I inclose another respectable application for the place held by the late Mr. Daingerfield. I am sensible of the delicacy attending the selection, as it relates to yourself; and will, if I can, converse with Mr. Nelson, on all the views which ought to be taken of the subject, before I form a final opinion. Being on a visit to Mr. Jefferson for a few days I may...
I have recd. yours of the 18th. by Mr. Mercer and have weighed as well as I could the pros & cons of the little enterprize half-formed by you. If it cd. be eligibly undertaken under any auspices, I am sure it would be under yours. But I confess its success would seem to require more celerity & secrecy than might be attainable, and in our situation offensive measures even on a small scale would...
I recd yours of 11 P.M. about 20 minutes ago. You will hear from Genl. A. or myself by other express who will leave this about 9 or 10 OC. If the force of the Enemy be not greater than yet appears, & he be without Cavalry, it seems extraordinary that he shd. venture on an enterprize to this distance from his shipping. He may however count on the effect of boldness & celerity on his side, and...
I thank you for your favour of the 15th, and the able Report of the Committee of foreign relations, and a very conciliatory Bill for the regulation of Seamen &c. I call it conciliatory, because in Theory it Should appear to be So; and because I believe it was sincerely intended to be so. The views were upright and the Motives pure, which produced it, I have no doubt. But will the present...
Ca. 30 August 1813, Bordeaux. “Being at this moment very unwell and almost blind I have it not in my power to transmit to you copies of my correspondence with Mr. Crawford & Mr. Warden touching my controversy with the latter and the motives of my writing a certain letter to the Duke of Bassano on which the President has demanded explanations of me through the Minister. That explanation has...
Your letter of yesterday, with the accompanying papers was delivered by the Express today, by 2 oC. The subject of them presents itself in a very perplexing posture. Under the power implied where not expressly waived, the arrangement might be rejected; but respect for the character & motives of our functionary unites with other considerations against that course. The course you suggest has...
There never was a Government upon earth, so much imposed upon as ours is at present, by some of its own officers—almost every one of them here seem to vie with each other who shall defraud and injure her the most in the public opinion. In the Navy agents department—In the Collectors Department—In the District Attorneys Department—And in the Federal Marshals department—it is notorious, that the...
I return the Petition of Getz, which being without other proof than his own oath, might justly require a resort to the District Atty or &c &c. If however on consultation with the Treasy Dept. a pardon be deemed proper, let one be made out. The communications from Brent at Madrid were returned several days ago. They are not without good sense, but betray a conscious deficiency of weight of...
Your favor on your departure from Richmond came to hand in due time. altho’ I may not have been among the first, I am certainly with the sincerest who congratulate you on your reentrance into the public National councils. your value there has never been unduly estimated by those whom personal feelings did not misguide. the late misunderstandings at Washington have been a subject of real...
I inclose for your perusal 2 letters from Mr. Jefferson. I apprehend that his idea of recoining for circulation the Exposè, would be more tardy as well as difficult than he calculates. His letters however are interesting; and may be communicated in such parts as you think proper to Mr. Dallas. I wish them of course to be returned. I see by several papers that a very unfair play is going on,...
I have received, Letters from my Family at St. Petersbourg, at two Several Times, under the Seal of The Department of State, and honoured with the Frank of your Name. I ought to have acknowledged the first by the return of the Post: but I hope you will excuse that omission and Accept my Thanks for both at once. I wish you Sir, in your important and difficult office, all the Honour, Comfort and...
Letter not found. 16 July 1810. Acknowledged in Monroe to JM, 25 July 1810 . Concerns the employment of Bizet, a French gardener.
On the question of publishing the secret journal & foreign correspondence of the Revolutionary Congs. it is not easy to give a satisfactory opinion, without some revisal of both. If a selection is made, the task ought to be executed with great care and without any tincture of partialities of any sort, and would be tedious & delicate, even with that exemption. If an entire publication be...
J. Madison requests a consultation with the Heads of Dept. on Tuesday next at Eleven OClock. June 3. 1814. The object is to decide on the plan of Campaign which our means render most eligible. The Secy. of State will cause to be made out & send over, any information recd in his Dept. relative to the military or naval force of the Enemy destined to Canada or to the U.S; or to military or naval...
I have just recd. yours of the 24th. Mr. Coles leaves me this moment on his way to Washington. There will certainly be an advantage in sending him in a pub: vessel; and I am glad it can be done with so little expence. If the Congs: will suffice for the pacific, it will be better than to send the Guerriere, which may possibly be wanted for other service. You have not yet alluded to my...
I recd. yesterday yours of the 14th. The confidential letters in it were returned by the same mail addressed to you as you suggested. The case of Genl. Ripley is in several respects a delicate one. If he is not satisfied with being breveted, and insists on a Court of Enquiry as a matter of right, ought he not still to have one? A refusal may subject the administration, to a suspicion of...
Is not Mr. Neilson’s request within the opinion of Mr. Rush agst the departure of American vessels with B. licence. Walkers case falls under a general regulation wch. Genl. Mason has in view. RC ( DNA : RG 59, War of 1812 Papers, Correspondence regarding Passports). In JM ’s hand. Undated; addressee not indicated. Conjectural date assigned and addressee identified based on evidence in nn. 1–2....
In addition to the depositions I had the honour of handing you during my Stay at Washington, I now beg leave to transmit herewith one, made by Mr. Jos: R. Paxson, a passenger arrived in the Cartel Fair American, who states a Conversation had with one of the Gentlemen at the head of the Alien office, from which it would appear that the British Government are desirous that the liberality they...
I just find by the letters from W. that you had at length been liberated from your detention there. Mr. Graham having left the packet for you unsealed, I have glanced over the papers relating to Grassin & the letters of Foster. I am glad to find that the Owner of the Privateer, domicil[i]ated here, is taken in hand. There can be no legal difficulty I presume in dealing with him. Foster seems...
I thank you for your letter of the 6 th . it is a proof of your friendship, and of the sincere interest you take in whatever concerns me. of this I have never had a moment’s doubt, and have ever valued it as a precious treasure. the question indeed whether I knew or approved of Gen l Wilkinson’s endeavors to prevent the restoration of the right of deposit at N. Orleans could never require a...
I omitted in mine of yesterday to advert to the remark in yours relating to Genl. Ripley. If he be retained in service preferably to the pretensions of others, he ought doubtless to be breveted. And should he be postponed, that compliment if liable to no objection not known to me, would alleviate his disappointment. In the latter view, it ought to be understood however that the brevet is not a...
I thank you for the frank and friendly communication in your kind letter of the 19th. of the Arrangement for the Negotiations at St. Petersburg. I have no Objection to make to it. The Points of Rank and Ettiquette, of Such vast acknowledged importance in Europe, and felt by every Man in America to be more consequence here than any Man will acknowledge; are So unsettled in this Country, that I...
I return the letter from Mr. Wirt, and the letter & paper from Mr. Mitchell. You cannot do better than pursue the result of your consultation with Mr. Rush on the subject. He is acquainted with what passed between me & Judge Tucker & Mr. Wirt. It seems proper that Mr. Mitchell be instructed to send if he be permitted the persons under his care, to the U.S. We are bound by respect to the laws,...