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It would seem mighty idle for me to inform you formally of the merits of Col o Trumbull as a painter or as a man. yet he asks my notice of him to my friends , as if his talents had not already distinguished him in their notice. on the continent of Europe his genius was placed much above West ’s. Baron Grimm , the arbiter of taste at Paris in my day, expressed to me often his decided & high...
Mr King of the Senate, called on me, on the part of a committee, to request that I would state for the consideration of the President, whether he saw any objection to the publication of the Secret journal of the old congress, & of the letters of our ministers in Europe at that period. DLC : Papers of James Monroe.
On the question of publishing the secret journal & foreign correspondence of the Revolutionary Congs. it is not easy to give a satisfactory opinion, without some revisal of both. If a selection is made, the task ought to be executed with great care and without any tincture of partialities of any sort, and would be tedious & delicate, even with that exemption. If an entire publication be...
All our intelligent Travellers to Washington, I find have an ambition to See both the present, and future President of the United States. I beg leave to introduce to you Colonelt William Sumner and his Sister, Miss Elizabeth Sumner, Children of our late Governor Sumner. Col Sumner has not only the Advantages of the best public Education at Colledge, and the Bar, but of many years service in...
Although, our good old Massachusetts, has encore quelques Prejuges; yet I find that all our liberal minded Men have a Strong desire to See our past present and future Presidents. They hesitate not to ask me for Introductions; and I hesitate not to give them; knowing as I do the past, present and future President to be as liberal Men as themselves. They all return So full of Gratitude for their...
It will be proper to take the steps suggested by Mr. Joy for obtaining further information. My enquiry as to Nootka Sound had reference to the grounds of the Brit. claim there, and its analogy to that of the U. S. at the mouth of Columbia. See Vancouvre’s acct. of the B. proceedings at Nootka: also Capt: Morris’s communication to Mr. Graham Ocr. 24. 1816. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
Although I am very sensible that any request of mine will have but little weight with the President I think it my duty to request you to inform him that I am in possession of property to a large amount belonging to Citizens of the U. States & that, as it is impossible to realize its value at the present moment, I fear it will be difficult to remit it in safety without some naval force to...
If it be proposed to place an inscription on the Capitol , the lapidary style requires that essential facts only should be stated, and these with a brevity admitting no superfluous word. the essential facts in the two inscriptions proposed are these the reasons for this brevity are that the letters must be of extraordinary magnitude to be read from below; that little space is allowed them,...
A mr Arm i stead , who married a neice of our governor , who is brother to the Col o Arm i stead that defended the fort at Baltimore and of one , or two other officers of great merit lost in the service, and who
As you appear to have read hastily the letter from Jessup, I send it back. That Onis is intriguing at N.O. is probable; and that the Spanish Govt. may meditate as attack there is possible; I should say impossible if there were less of folly in its Councils; or it might not possibly be backed by another Govt.: altho’ it is not easy to conceive that this can be the case. The mercantile...
There is much force in the reasons given herein for an appt. of a Successor to Genl. Smith, which I had proposed to delay till our return to Washington, if not till the meeting of Congs. Unless you think some other preferable on the whole to the Depy: Marshal, direct a Commission for him, or if you please a blank one, to be made out & forwarded for our signature. Yrs NN : Papers of James Monroe.
On perusing your letters to Mr. De Neuville, and Mr. Gallatin, some ideas occurred which induced me to put them on paper for your consideration. Those relating to the first letter are interlined with a pencil. Those relating to the 2d. are partly so, & partly penned on a separate sheet. In the communication to Mr. G. I thought it might be not amiss to suggest the several topics which he may...
Will you join mr Divers here at dinner tomorrow? and can you tell me the name of the Collector at Norfolk ? RC (facsimile in Gerard A. J. Stodolski, Inc. , spring 1985 catalogue, item 96); partially dated at foot of text. Not recorded in SJL . The collector at norfolk was Charles K. Mallory .
I sent to mr Divers to-day to ask a dinner for mr Correa , D r Wistar , mr Gilmer & myself for tomorrow. I did not venture to add your name and mr Rush ’s not knowing your convenience; but I am sure he will be rejoiced to see you both. Affectionate salutations to yourself & mr Rush
Among the inclosures is a very extry. letter from Mr De Neuville. It was brought by his private Secretary from whom I thought it better for several reasons to receive it, than to let him proceed with it to your House. As its contents were neither known nor guessed, it was possible that they might call for an attention which my knowlege of them might hasten, and it was desirable for you that...
Yours of the 14. sd. be 13th. has just come to hand. Wishing to read more attentively than circumstances of the moment permit, the communications from Mr. Harris, I do not return them by the present mail. Shd. the affair of the Russian Consul not be terminated before the arrival of Mr. Coles, the full explanations he carries, can not fail I think, to dissipate the impressions of the Emperor,...
I have yours of the 12th. intended for the 11th. inst. I have no map by which I can judge of the comparative values of the 2 offers of Mr Bagot as to the fisheries. There will be some delicacy in referring the arrangement to Mr. A. who prefers a decision here, and will say that we having better means of procuring the necessary information we ought not to put the task & responsibility on him....
I have just recd. yours of the written on your return to the City. It may be best to taper off with Sweden by appointing a Secy. of L. to be Chargè on the departure of Russell and the reasons you give favor that of Hughes; whose wishes, rather than understanding seem to have listened to your remarks on the subject. It must be kept in mind however, that in Case Mr. R. shd. chuse to prolong his...
I have just recd. yours of the 3d. and return without delay the several letters inclosed in it. The apprehensions of Mr. Shaler, are instigated at least, by the recent occurrence, if true, at Oran, and its probable effect on the relations of G. B. & Algiers. Mr. Adams’s idea of making his Country, the sole Champion of Xndum against the Barbarians, is very heroic; but is not in perfect harmony...
I recd. yesterday the 2 letters from Onis herewith returned, and today copies of the papers transmitted by Mr. Crowninshield, which as the originals are in the Dept. I retain. The law of Nations, and our position in relation to the contest between Spain & Spanish America, will of course govern the reply to these representations. The remarks of Judge Story as to the fisheries are valuable, and...
I have recd yours of July 31. and return the answer to Mr. B. with one or two alterations, the cheif of which is an extension of the arrangement to Lake Champlain. An entire prohibition of armed vessels there where there is much smuggling from Canada, might not be convenient to us; nor would it be reciprocal, considering the manner in which the waters of that Lake are divided between the...
The 2 letters of Mr. De Neuville present topics which are not agreeable. The one demanding the recall of Mr. Lee will be sufficiently answered by his actual return to the U. S. and an intimation that without any particular examination of the charge agst. Him. This Govt. could not fail to respect the wishes of M. C. M. in such a case. The other letter complaining of the toast of the Post Master...
I have just recd. yours of the 24th. Mr. Coles leaves me this moment on his way to Washington. There will certainly be an advantage in sending him in a pub: vessel; and I am glad it can be done with so little expence. If the Congs: will suffice for the pacific, it will be better than to send the Guerriere, which may possibly be wanted for other service. You have not yet alluded to my...
I must ask the favor of you & Mr. Rush to attend to the subject of the letter from Mr. Munroe & the one inclosed in it. As the building proposed is to be on public ground, for pub : use, & eventually to be purchased, with rent in the mean time, paid, by the public, the Ex: sanction merits enquiry & consideration. There is always some risk of error, in yielding to sudden impulses, especially...
I have recd. yours of the 16. & 17. I return the letter of M. De Kantzow. Our expectation of letters from Mr. Russel, or of his speedy return, will justify our delay in taking up the subject, and will be a proper answer to it. It will be well not to encourage too much the idea of a treaty; first because, it is not very probable that Sweeden will admit her Colonies to be included, as a part of...
I return the letter from Mr. Wirt, and the letter & paper from Mr. Mitchell. You cannot do better than pursue the result of your consultation with Mr. Rush on the subject. He is acquainted with what passed between me & Judge Tucker & Mr. Wirt. It seems proper that Mr. Mitchell be instructed to send if he be permitted the persons under his care, to the U.S. We are bound by respect to the laws,...
I rcd. from Mr. Graham during your trip to Loudon the inclosed letter from Mr. Bagot. The subject of it is delicate. The first remark is that it belongs to Congress, not to the Ex. unless provided for by conventional arrangement explanatory or supplemental. The 2d. remark is that it has the aspect of equity, and may have been countenanced by the conversations of our Minister at London. 3d. But...
Herewith are the papers recd. from Mr. Hughs. He seems to have been no wise sparing of diplomatic politeness to the Spanish Govr. You will of course express the satisfaction afforded by the successful executing of his mission in reference to our Captive Citizens with an approbation of the interest taken in behalf of the English & French Captives; and forward the documents to Mr. Erving, with...
I have recd. yours of the 7th. and return the communications from Mr. Adams. The arrangement of the fisheries is a delicate subject, as it relates to the public sensibility; to its intrinsic merits; and to the peculiar importance attached to it by respectable names. It will be better to do nothing, than to surrender the point of right, or to accept what may be of small value, with an actual...
Mr. De Neuville arrived here on Saturday and sets out this morning on his return. I inclose his letter of Credence with a note of the date of its delivery. Be so good as to have an answer to the K. of the Netherlands sent to me for signature. That to the K. of Wertemburg is returned. Friendly respects The inclosed letters from J.B. may be worth attention in estimating and comparing characters...