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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Monroe, James" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
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Had I known before that the visit you mention was desired, I would have made it. it cannot now be done, as he sat out on his journey this morning. some opportunities of friendly attention had before occurred, during his illness, and I availed myself of them; & learning last night that ripe figs would be acceptable to him, & that he was to set out on his journey this morning, I sent a servant...
Letter not found. 16 July 1810. Acknowledged in Monroe to JM, 25 July 1810 . Concerns the employment of Bizet, a French gardener.
If I did not misunderstand you when in Washington the Gardener Beza, was not now engaged or wanted for your service, and would not, probably, be unwilling to undertake a job for me. Should this be the case, I would ask the favor of you to send him down as soon as possible. I wish to employ him, & 2 or 3 hands under him, in preparing a piece of ground for a Garden, and to have it executed in a...
I recieved your friendly letter of Dec. 24. on my return from Bedford , at which place I was at it’s date. it conveyed me the first notice of the attempt to draw me into the newspapers on the subject of the propositions which had been passing between the agents of the Rivanna company & myself for their accomodation in passing the navigation through my lands. I immediately enquired into it, and...
Since my last to you , the Directors of the Rivanna company have changed their minds, and instead of going through my canal they have determined to go through the bed of the river; and it being a question between us, whether they or I must build & maintain the lock at my dam, which dam they must have built had I not done it, they have proposed a reference to Arbitrators, to which I gladly...
I am just on the wing to Bedford to which place my affairs call me suddenly. I have therefore only time to acknolege the reciept of your favor of the 21 st and to congratulate you on your election to the chair of the state by so honorable a vote. I rejoice too that you have accepted it; for altho’ it is not a field on which much genius can be displayed, yet it is a prominent one. but the great...
I may perhaps consult too much my own wishes public & personal, and too little a proper estimate of yours, in intimating the near approach of a vacancy in the Department of State, which will present to your comparison, as far as lies with me, that sphere for your patriotic services, with the one in which they are now rendered. Should such a transfer of them be inadmissible or ineligible, on...
I have recd. your letter of the 23d. and learn with much pleasure that you are not disinclined to the Station wch. the one answered by it, presented to your consideration. In discharging the duties of this Station, I am aware that the Functionary must carry into it, a just respect for his own principles, and above all for the dictates of his Conscience. But with the mutual knowledge of our...
I have the pleasure this moment of receiving yours of the 29th. inst: I am particularly glad to find that you will be able to set out at so early a day for Washington. To the advantage of preventing an inconvenient chasm in the public business, will be added the opportunity of a provident attention to the accomodations required by your establishment here. The House occupied by Mr. Smith is the...
Altho’ I have expressed a hope that you would leave Richmond before a Commission of Secretary of State, could reach it, yet as it may have happened otherwise, & as it may be agreeable to you to have it previously in your hands, I now inclose the document as just compleated. There is the less objection to this step, as in case it should pass you on the road, another can readily be made out on...
Your favor on your departure from Richmond came to hand in due time. altho’ I may not have been among the first, I am certainly with the sincerest who congratulate you on your reentrance into the public National councils. your value there has never been unduly estimated by those whom personal feelings did not misguide. the late misunderstandings at Washington have been a subject of real...
I inclose a letter from a M r John Dortic , who being bound to France shortly and to return again, wishes to be the bearer of any dispatches the government may have for that country. of this person I know nothing more than that he brought me lately a packet of seeds from M. Thouin Director of the National garden of France , which he very kindly notified me of from N.Y. and afterwards forwarded...
I have received, Letters from my Family at St. Petersbourg, at two Several Times, under the Seal of The Department of State, and honoured with the Frank of your Name. I ought to have acknowledged the first by the return of the Post: but I hope you will excuse that omission and Accept my Thanks for both at once. I wish you Sir, in your important and difficult office, all the Honour, Comfort and...
I just find by the letters from W. that you had at length been liberated from your detention there. Mr. Graham having left the packet for you unsealed, I have glanced over the papers relating to Grassin & the letters of Foster. I am glad to find that the Owner of the Privateer, domicil[i]ated here, is taken in hand. There can be no legal difficulty I presume in dealing with him. Foster seems...
I snatch the opportunity by the bearer of yours of this date, to send to the Ct. House for the next rider who does not call here, the line you request in answer. As the report alluded to is erroneous as I supposed it to have been, a contradiction seemed to be due to the manner in which it was given to the public. Mr. Gales you will see has undertaken one which will probably be sufficient....
Among the papers herewith inclosed are letters from the Govt. at Santa fee, and among these one to the French Minister at Washington inclosing another to the Minister of Foreign relations at Paris. In opening the general packet addressed to the Executive, that for Serrurier was so involved as to be opened unintenti[on]ally at the same time. The more important one for Paris escaped this...
I ascribe to the heat of the weather my not having yet had the pleasure of your promised visit. We hope when the obstacle is removed that we shall have the gratification increased by the company of Mrs. Monroe. Among the papers now forwarded is another note from Mr. F. His late ones breathe a spirit which it is difficult to account for without the painful supposition that he believes it not...
Mr. Hamilton from the John Adams reached me yesterday. He reposes to day, and will be with you tomorrow. I send by the bearer, the dispatches opened at the Dept. of State &c. The packets of less importance Mr. H. will take with him tomorrow. The Secy of the Navy you will observe suggests the disclosure of the intelligence recd. from Mr Russel. An abstract of the matter in the letter to Mr....
I have just recd. your favor of this date. I need not express the perfect confidence I feel in the friendly & considerate inducements to your suggestion. But having made definitive preparation for the intended visit; having in no instance omitted it for many years, & the motive being strengthened by the late one recd. by myself, I think the omission, if tested by prudential calculations of a...
I thank you for The Copy of The Presidents Message, and for the Volume of Documents. They do great honour to The President, to his Ministers and Ambassadors: and I rejoice in the Appearance of unanimity they have produced in Congress and in The Nation: which not withstanding all the apprehensions representations and Threats of Divisions, is greater than I have ever known in America for fifty...
I thank you for your letter of the 6 th . it is a proof of your friendship, and of the sincere interest you take in whatever concerns me. of this I have never had a moment’s doubt, and have ever valued it as a precious treasure. the question indeed whether I knew or approved of Gen l Wilkinson’s endeavors to prevent the restoration of the right of deposit at N. Orleans could never require a...
It has so happened that the above &c did not come to my knowledge till the arrival of the bearer. I return them with regret for the hurry. Mr. P. did not come to dinner with me owing as I presume to the late hour of our separation. I concur in the idea you express. RC ( DLC : John Henry Papers). Undated; in JM’s hand, written at the foot of Monroe to JM, 11 Mar. 1812 . Date assigned here on...
I have just recd. a letter from Genl Floyd (which I enclose for your perusal) giving an account of the transactions which have lately taken place at Amelia Island under the Auspices of Genl Mathews. From this account, the affair is worse than I had expected. The veracity and intelligence, & I may add, the patriotism of the writer, exclude the idea of misrepresentation, or mistake in the...
I have the honour of your Letter of the 27 Ap. accompanied with one from St Petersbourg, for which, as well as for another which I received Sometime Since; and neglected to acknowledge, I pray you to accept my thanks. I am Sorry you had a moment’s uneasiness on account of the Accident you mention. I wish you had read the whole letter, not for any information in it, but to make you Smile at the...
With this letter I put into the post office a very large pa cket containing all the papers respecting the Batture which I reciev ed from your office. for these papers I gave a specific receipt , sub scribed to a list of them. I had stitched them together in qui res to prevent their separation or loss in the hands of counsel . I hope mr Graham will take the trouble to examine them by my...
1 June 1812, Washington. “I have invented a new method of constructing and throwing a Bomb Shell upon which the resistance of the atmosphere will be so small as that the shell may be sent three times the distance, which the same quantity of Powder, would send a common one; & with much the greater accuracy as it flies thro’ the air on the principle of a rifle Ball. I am fully convinced that I...
I shall always be happy when your own or mrs Monroe’s convenience will permit us to see you here; but know too well that the short visits you pay to your possessions, & the many things to be attended to there, do not admit your being embarrassed with visits & ceremonies. consider us therefore as fully aware of this, that our intercourse must be subordinate to these circumstances, & that the...
The letter from Acheson, should be known in some of its contents. I inclose it to you for reasons on the face of it. I inclose also the letter from Gilbert Taylor, as a memento to the letter you are to write to the Govr. of Tennessee, on the subject of the illegal enterprize on foot in that State. We are so far well on our way. Yrs. RC ( DLC : Monroe Papers). JM probably enclosed the 25 Aug....
I recd. yours of the 2d. inst: last night. Your observations on the policy called for by the crisis produced by Hull’s surrender are entirely just; and I feel all the value of the aid you offer in meeting it in a proper manner. Both before & since our parting conversation on that subject, the idea has been revolved in the hope that some shape might be given to it worthy both of your standing...
I recd. last evening your favor of the 4th: with a subsequent note covering a letter from Mr. Graham. That from Duane, referred to as inclosed, was omitted. All the accts., printed & manuscript, coincide with the view given by Mr. Graham, of the Western feeling produced by Hull’s disaster. The great point is to seize it and give it proper direction. This requires one mind of the right sort,...
I have recd. yours of the 6th. I am sorry to find that Pike confides so little in our prospects. From a letter of Genl. Dearborn to the Secy. of War, it appears that the force at his disposal is more scanty than was hoped. I am not sure whether his immediate plan is to take advantage of the detachments of the B. force from Montreal, by directing his principal operations towards that place, or...
I have this moment recd. yours of the 8th. & 9th. A failure in the mail, occasioned the recet. of them at the same time. I have not had time to examine the Volunteer Act, which has been forwarded to me, the present mail which brought it, remaining but a short period, & that being occupied in reading papers &c. now sent to the Secy. of War, & others requiring attention. He will shew you those...
Not a word from abroad, or the West, since you left us. Dearborn has still one eye on Montreal, and the other on Niagara: forcing the attention of the Enemy to both, with a purpose, doubtless of striking, himself, at either or both according to circumstances. The story of an armament agst. Plattsburg is groundless. Niagara was very weak at the last date, and more in danger of attack, than...
Still without authentic information from Abroad. The Halifax papers expect Adml. Warren with a naval force, and an offer of peace. It appears that Wellington has gained a victory over Marmont; The extent of it not ascertained. From the West the accounts are that a B & Indn. force amounting to about 600 left Malden after the surrender of Detroit, to attack F. Wayne, & in case of success, to...
The strange jumble of names, places, & titles on the inclosed letter seemed to authorise me to open it, as it does also to forward it to you. yet it properly belongs to neither of us but to the Secretary of the Treasury to whom it makes splendid promises. Our election of electors took place yesterday. a general assurance that there would be no opposition ticket prevented half the voters from...
Does History or Experience, afford an Example, of Such a Phenomenon, as this, now exhibited to Mankind, by our pious, virtuous and patriotic American Republick, whether We view it as a federative Republick, or whether We consider the Single and Simple Parts that compose the whole? The dread, of Taxes, to which all Mankind have a natural Antipathy; the hatred of War, which is Stronger in the...
21 January 1813, New York. “Several persons, neutral foreigners, as well as Americans, whose private affairs require their presence in England have applied to us to procure them passages, and having now in this Port a very fine ship lying idle, we ask permission to send her to England as a cartel to be commanded by our Cap. Joseph Skinner and Cap N. Willis or one of them.” Remark that the...
I have the honor to enclose herewith a duplicate of my letter of the 25th. Inst: together with the official report of Col: Lewis, to Genl. Winchester of the Action of the 18th. Inst: (No 1.) That you may be enabled to judge of the propriety of the Steps which were taken by me previously to the unfortunate event at the River Raisin, I proceed to give you an account of the Situation of the...
30 January 1813, Washington. Seeks an appointment as agent for the exchange of prisoners of war at Quebec, “the only vacant Post, where an agent for that purpose is admitted under the late arrangement between Sir John Borlasse Warren & my father.” Urges the establishment of an agency at Quebec on the grounds that “at the commencement of the ensuing campaign … a first Engagement may place...
I thank you for your favour of the 15th, and the able Report of the Committee of foreign relations, and a very conciliatory Bill for the regulation of Seamen &c. I call it conciliatory, because in Theory it Should appear to be So; and because I believe it was sincerely intended to be so. The views were upright and the Motives pure, which produced it, I have no doubt. But will the present...
My Several communications by Doctor Stevens were under dates of the 25th. to the 30th. January inclusively, and I had the honor of adressing to you copies by Mr Doolittle with a letter introductory of him—on the 11st. [ sic ] Inst. Both these Gentlemen, according to last accounts—must be now about putting to sea the first from Nantes—the latter from L’Orient. From the high approbation lately...
In my last I promised to advise you of the result of the Voninteer Expedition from East Tennessee United with the troops of the United States that march against the Semenolia Indians after a march of near Seven hundred miles with out being retarded by Ice Snow hammocks or Marshes which afforded the Enemy great Oppertunities for advantague we arrived at Paynes Town in the Lochway Settlements...
By an indirect occasion to Natches I have the honor to inform you that an express has just arrived here with letters from the Mexican camp at La Bahia which confirm the intelligence previously received by desertors and communicated by my letter of the 6 in. The papers I have the honor to enclose herewith contain the best account of those occurrences, and as they are corroborated by many other...
There never was a Government upon earth, so much imposed upon as ours is at present, by some of its own officers—almost every one of them here seem to vie with each other who shall defraud and injure her the most in the public opinion. In the Navy agents department—In the Collectors Department—In the District Attorneys Department—And in the Federal Marshals department—it is notorious, that the...
M r Poindexter with his respects to M r monroe asks the favor of him to convey the Guinea grass seed, sent herewith, to m r Jefferson . M r Poindexter regrets that through the carelessness of his servant the grass seed were mixed with some of another kind, and a quantity of them lost, by being loose in the Portmanteau. m r P.
Knowing it an indispensable duty I owe, our beloved Cuntry at this momentous period, (and equally due from every good Citizen) to make every effort for her defence aganst the Stratagems of, both Foren, & domestic foes, and to give information of approaching dangers: Permit me to make the following communication, as lately made known to me by an inteligent gentleman now present, (but will leave...
The views with which the U.S. entered into the war, necessarily dispose them to a just peace. The promptitude with which the mediation of H.I.M. was accepted and the purpose of sending ministers to St.P. without waiting for the determination of G.B. is proof of this disposition. An armistice as sparing an effusion of blood, & as contemplating an auspicious result to the mediation, can not...
upon the 23d of Feb’ry mr Adams addrest a Letter to you, and inclosed a private Letter from my Son at St Petersburgh to me, requesting a return of it by the next Mail. as the Letter has not been received I presume in the multiplicity of buisness, It has been forgotten. You will oblige me by sending it, and at the same time do me the favour to forwarding the packet which accompanies this Letter...
I have in common with many other Inhabitants, felt some uneasiness at the defenceless situation of the district of Columbia at This critical time. The common rumer for the last Ten days that Admiral Warren was about to attact Baltimore, the arming of Lanchas and small craft for that purpose, and more Especially as this report has come direct from the admiral himself by several sources, and...
Your favour of the 10th. of this month has laid me under very great Obligations to you. No intelligence could be more agreable to me, than the information, that the conduct of my Son has the entire approbation of The President. As a public Man I have no views for him, but to such Services as The President Shall assign him. As a private person, though his absence and the loss of his Society is...