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§ To John Armstrong, George W. Erving, and James Monroe. 4 December 1805, Department of State. “Inclosed is a copy of the message of the President yesterday delivered to the two houses of Congress. The importance of its contents makes it desireable that you should receive it with as little delay as possible.” Letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 59, IM , vol. 6); RC ( DLC : Curry Autograph Collection);...
A month having elapsed since the departure of M Monroe it may be presumed that by the time this reaches you communications will have passed with the French government sufficiently explaining its views towards the United States and preparing the way for the ulterior instructions which the President thinks proper should now be given. In case a conventional arrangement with France should have...
You will herewith receive a Commission and letters of Credence, one of you as Minister Plenipotentiary, the other as Minister Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, to treat with the Government of the French Republic, on the Subject of the Mississipi, and the Territories Eastward thereof, and without the limits of the United States. The object in view is to procure by just and satisfactory...
The reasonable and friendly views with which you have been instructed by the President to enter into negociations with the French Government justify him in expecting from them an issue favorable to the tranquillity and to the useful relations between the two Countries. It is not forgotten however that these views, instead of being reciprocal, may find, on the part of France, a temper adverse...
Know Ye, That reposing special Trust and confidence in the Integrity, Prudence and Abilities of James Monroe, late Governor of the State of Virginia, and of Robert R. Livingston, at present the Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States to the French Republic, I have nominated, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, appointed them the said Robert R. Livingston to be Minister...
Since my last which was of April 18th the tenor of our information from France and Great Britain renders a war between those powers in the highest degree probable. It may be inferred at the same time from the information given by Mr. Livingston and Mr. King that the importance of the United States is rising fast in the estimation both of the French and British cabinets and that Louisiana is as...
Your dispatches including the Treaty and two Conventions signed with a French Plenipotentiary on the 30th of April were safely delivered on the 14th by Mr. Hughes, to whose care you had committed them. In concurring with the disposition of the French Government to treat for the whole of Louisiana although the western part of it was not embraced by your powers you were justified by the solid...
In a letter from Dupont de Nemours to me is the following passage. ‘Houdon a laissé en Amerique un trés beau buste de Benjamin Franklin, lequel est actuellement chez moi. ce buste en marbre vaut cent louis de notre monnaie, environ 480. D. rien n’est plus convenable a la nation que de la placer dans votre Capitole &c. et Houdon, a qui la Virginie doit encore mille ecus sur la statue de...
I now return the letters to you from Mr. Purviance & Cambaceres, with an acknowledgment of those in which they were inclosed. The papers last recd. from you in relation to Mr. Skipwith will be of use in establishing one or two material points. His case has been a hard one, but it may be questioned whether he be well founded in the extent of his claims for interest & Agency for Claims. The...
The mail is closing just as the inclosed is put into my hands. tomorrow we shall write to you fully. Adieu. PrC ( MHi ); at foot of text: “James Monroe”; endorsed by TJ in ink on verso. Enclosure: Resolutions of the Senate, 12 Jan., agreeing to Monroe’s appointments as minister extraordinary and plenipotentiary to France and Spain (see TJ to Monroe, 13 Jan. ; JEP Journal of the Executive...
I have the honor to recommend to your attention the case of Messrs Francis and Charles Bradbury, explained in the enclosed document, in order that you may aid them in regaining the proceeds of the sales of their property at Buenos Ayres, if the suggestion of their having passed into the hands of the British, at the capture of the place should prove to be well founded. I have the honor &c. DNA...
Since writing my letter of yesterday it has occurred to me that the stile in which, in my letters to you, I have spoken of the mass of falsehood & calumny afloat in our country, & the impossibility of believing what is beyond the evidence of our own senses, is too strong to be published. such a fellow as Cobbet, abusing us as a nation, will quote this as testimony of it given by ourselves. the...
In my letter of March l8th. to the joint Commission, it was signified that in a Conventional arrangement on the subject of Boundaries, it would be inconsistent with the views of the President, to open any part of Louisiana, to a British trade with the Indians. From the evident solicitude of the British Government on this point, it is highly probable that the determination of the President will...
I have recd. your favor of the 9th. April, which gave us the first notice of your arrival in France. The moment of it, according to the posture of things between the two great rival powers as represented by our Ministers, must have been peculiarly critical. The information cited from King in my public letter marks the source from which the British cabinet begins to take counsel on subjects...
Your last favor was of Mar. 11. The language of Mr. Fox and Mr. Gray, raises very favorable prospects; but I am aware of the difficulties that may occur in settling details as well as in defining general principles. Other members of the Cabinet may also not concur in the liberal dispositions of those gentlemen. This goes by Mr. P. who is charged with the joint commission, and instructions...
I inclose a copy of a letter from Messrs Levi Hollingsworth and Co. of Philada, in which they complain that after an unjust sentence of condemnation passed upon their property at Tortola it was so far undervalued that a reversal of the sentence will leave them very considerable losers. If you can aid them, in any advisable mode, to diminish the sacrifice I pray you to do it. But as their case...
I now return mr Clarke’s & Shee’s letters inclosed in your’s of yesterday. mr Clarke’s object is to save 6. cents a stock. this is proper for him as an economical manager. but you & I must see of what other aspects it is susceptible. the US. have gun stocks for sale . they are to suspend the sale & lend them to the state of Virginia, that she may return them in kind afterwards with a saving to...
I have your two favors of the 11 & 15. instant. The letter inclosed in the first is returned, Mr. Livingston having sailed before it could reach N. Y. and the letter for which it was to be substituted, having before gone on to him. The letter inclosed in the latter is also inclosed, with a note at the bottom of it by the President which will serve for an answer. We think the best mode of...
I recd your favor of by Mr. Hughs, the bearer of the public dispatches from you & Mr L. The purchase of Louisiana in its full extent, tho’ not contemplated is received with warm, & in a manner universal approbation. The uses to which it may be turned, render it a truly noble acquisition. Under prudent management it may be made to do much good as well as to prevent much evil. By lessening the...
I dropped you a line on the 10th. informing you of a nomination I had made of you to the Senate, and yesterday I inclosed you their approbation not then having time to write. the agitation of the public mind on occasion of the late suspension of our right of deposit at N. Orleans is extreme. in the Western country it is natural and grounded on honest motives. in the seaports it proceeds from a...
Inclosed herewith is the Cypher you are to carry with you. I send it apart from the despatches, because I shall put a few words in them into Cypher. The despatches will probably go off on wednesday morning, or thursday at farthest. They have been delayed by the slowness of Congs. in passing the law for which they waited. I recd. last evening yours of the 22d. & expect to hear further from you...
It being presumed that by the time of your receiving this communication, the Negotiation with which you were charged by my letter of 5th. January last, will no longer require your presence in London, the President thinks it proper that you should now proceed to Madrid, and in conjunction with Mr. Pinckney open a negotiation on the important subjects remaining to be adjusted with the Spanish...
I have not written to you by mr Purviance because he can give you vivâ voce all the details of our affairs here with a minuteness beyond the bounds of a letter, and because indeed I am not certain this letter will find you in England. the sole object in writing it is to add another little commission to the one I had formerly troubled you with. it is to procure for me a ‘machine for...
The turn which our affairs have taken at Madrid renders it expedient in the judgment of the President that you should proceed thither without delay in execution of the instructions heretofore given with such alterations and additions as are contained in this letter. You will of course make such communications to the British Government on your departure, as will guard your mission against...
I am late in answering your favor of the 4th. because the Navy department, from an extraordinary press of business, could not till within this day or two furnish me the inclosed papers . you will see by them that the money for Gosport (12,000. D.) has been placed in Norfolk at mr Hopkins’s command, ever since the last week in January. why it should have been witheld so long he will probably...
Having received from Mr. Merry, a communication of the notice given by his Government to the Foreign Ministers at London, on the 8th. April last, on the proposed blockade of the four German Rivers, it was thought proper without waiting for the communication through you, to give an answer containing the observations which you will find in the inclosed copy of it. They will be a guide to you in...
I observe that the resolution of the legislature of Virginia , of Jan. 23. in desiring us to look out for some proper place to which insurgent negroes may be sent, expresses a preference of the continent of Africa, or some of the Spanish or Portuguese settlements in S. America: in which preference, & especially as to the former I entirely concur. on looking towards Africa for our object, the...
Since the communications by the Revenge which sailed on monday last, nothing very material has occurred. The British squadron, on receiving the Proclamation, fell down to the capes, near which (in Lynhaven Bay) several of the same or substituted ships remain. It is not known whether any orders have been recd. from the Admiral relative to their conduct under the Proclamation. They continue to...
The 1st. of mr Nicholson’s resolutions was decided yesterday affirmatively by 87. republ. against 9. republ. and 26. feds. had all been present it would have been 104. do. against 11. do. and 27. do. the latter number comprehending every federalist in the house. mr R. withdrew before the question was put. this is considered as a decision of the main question. when they come to details the...
Your letter of Octr. 24 with the communications which passed with the British Government on the subject of Capt. Whitby was not received till last evening. Not a moment will be lost in taking the steps most likely to hasten the testimony which may establish the essential facts charged on that officer. But considering the tedious passage of your letter, the season of the year, the particular...
I have already, in a letter by the last British packet given you a hint of the sensation produced in Mr. & Mrs. Merry, by a circumstance of Etiquette. I had supposed that it would yield to the proofs of respect & cordiality which would be experienced by them, from all in & about the Government, and to the explanations which would be superadded. I find however that the case is to be transmitted...
In the month of September last, the French ship of War L’Impetueux of 74 guns, being disabled by a gale of wind, and making for an asylum, was fired upon and afterwards burnt by the British ship Melampus and two others, on the coast of North Carolina, within the limits of our jurisdiction. The inclosed communication from the Navy Department, which had instituted an enquiry through Capt....
Hoping that a post note on Norfolk will be cash in Richmond, I enclose one for $300, instead of committing bank notes to the mail. Nothing has occurred since you left us worth detailing to you. We are still uninformed of the precise circumstances which have detained Mr. Rose on board the frigate. There is a report that he will either pass up the bay to Annapolis, or possibly engage a vessel to...
Being advised that the Board of Commissioners under the 7th article of the British Treaty, when they were about to make a final adjournment found that the United States were in advance the sum of five hundred and twenty six pounds four shillings and nine pence, and that they ordered it to be paid to you, I request you to be pleased to pay it over to Sir Francis Baring & Co to be applied by...
Under the same cover with this you will receive a letter for our Consul at St Petersburg committing to his charge a letter from the President to the Emperor Alexander, and inclosing a copy of a letter from this Department to Genl Armstrong. The letter to the Consul is open to your perusal, to be thereafter duly forwarded. It is thought proper that you should be thus put into possession of the...
You will herewith receive the ratification by the President and Senate, of the Convention with the British Government signed on the 12th of May 1803, with an exception of the Vth article. Should the British Government accede to this change in the instrument, you will proceed to an exchange of ratifications and transmit the one received, without delay, in order that the proper steps may be...
I have recd. your favor of the 23 Ult. Callendar made his appearance here some days ago in the same temper which is described in your letter. He seems implacable towards the principal object of his complaints and not to be satisfied in any respect, without an office. It has been my lot to bear the burden of receiving & repelling his claims. What feelings may have been excited by my plain...
The information and observations which you have as yet received from me since your arrival in London, on the impressment of our seamen, and other violations of our rights, have been in private letters only. The delay in making these injuries the subject of official communications, proceeded first from an expectation that the British Government would have notified formally to the United States,...
I have not yet thanked you for the copy of your Message, which I find has attracted attention, and circulates with advantage to yourself, as well as to the public. It is much to be wished that the same manly and enlarged sentiments, and the same just and enlightened policy, might distinguish the addresses of all the Republican Governors, and co-operate with the example set by the President, in...
Reynolds , collector of York, is dead, and Wm. Carey of that place is recommended very strongly by mr Shields. tho’ I have great confidence in mr Shields’s recommendation, yet as the best men some times see characters thro’ the false medium of friendship I pray you to make what enquiry you can in Richmond & communicate it to me. Accept assurances of my constant & affectionate esteem & respect....
Since you left us we have no further intelligence from N. Orleans, except a letter dated Jany 20 from the vice Consular agent there, from which it appears that the letters to the Govr. & Intendant from the Spanish Minister here, had arrived abt. the 13th. and had not on the 20th. produced the desired change in the state of things. The delay however does not seem to have been viewed by the...
I wrote you on the 8th. instant enclosing a pamphlet on the principle in question between this Country & G.B. and mentioned that it would be communicated by the Presidt. with other documents on the subject. This will not be done, and I have written to recall the letter & pamphlets from the ports to which they were sent. If either of the copies should have gone to sea & should reach you, be so...
The condemnation of the cargo of the Olive Branch having been reversed, General Allen finds himself in the situation pointed out at the close of my letter of the 13th of December 1803 of having gained no more by his judicial pursuit than an abstract decision of the illegality of the capture: for Messrs. Bird, Savage & Bird, of London, who became his sureties on the delivery of the property to...
Your several letters to Apl. 19. have been recd. The dawn of your negociations has given much pleasure and much expectation . We wait with anxiety your next despatches, which will probably disclose the precise prospect if not the result in form . The crisis as seen here has been auspicious and I am persuaded that you will have seised [ sic ] and pushed its advantages . The purchase of the
By Capt. Brewster, who, with his son and two Pilots, are about to proceed to England as Witnesses in the case of Capt. Whitby, I send you copies of several of my last letters. He will also be the bearer of a letter from the Collector of New York stating the advances made to the Witnesses respectively. Two other Witnesses are expected to sail from Philada., to whom it was found necessary to...
In the joint letter from you & Mr. P. of October a project on impressments is referred to which does not appear. I forget what passed with you in conversation on the subject. You will oblige me by dropping me the state of the case, and if there be any document in your hands that you will be so good as to forward it or a copy of it. It can if necessary be thrown into the mass which will be...
Since mine of the 26th. Callender is arrived here. he did not call on me; but understanding he was in distress, I sent Capt Lewis to him with 50. D. to inform him we were making some enquiries as to his fine which would take a little time, & lest he suffer in the mean time I had sent him &c. his language to Capt Lewis was very high toned. he intimated that he was in possession of things which...
A confidential opportunity offering by mr Baring, I can venture to write to you with less reserve than common conveyances admit. the 150 livres you paid to mr Chas for me shall be replaced in the hands of mr Lewis your manager here, with thanks to you for honoring what you had no reason to doubt was a just claim on me. I do not know him personally or any otherwise than by his history of our...
I some days ago made a remittance to mr Jefferson with a request that he would pay you the amount of Jones’s bill with the costs and other disbursements. for these last he would have to ask your information as they were not stated on the bill. with this, be so good as to accept my thanks for the attention you have paid to this commission, and the trouble it has given you. from Your letter of...
The bearer hereof is mr Whitney of Connecticut a mechanic of the first order of ingenuity, who invented the Cotton gin now so much used to the South; he is at the head of a considerable gun manufactory in Connecticut, and furnishes the US. with muskets, undoubtedly the best they recieve. he has invented moulds & machines for making all the peices of his locks so exactly equal, that take 100...