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§ To John Armstrong, George W. Erving, and James Monroe. 4 December 1805, Department of State. “Inclosed is a copy of the message of the President yesterday delivered to the two houses of Congress. The importance of its contents makes it desireable that you should receive it with as little delay as possible.” Letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 59, IM , vol. 6); RC ( DLC : Curry Autograph Collection);...
A month having elapsed since the departure of M Monroe it may be presumed that by the time this reaches you communications will have passed with the French government sufficiently explaining its views towards the United States and preparing the way for the ulterior instructions which the President thinks proper should now be given. In case a conventional arrangement with France should have...
You will herewith receive a Commission and letters of Credence, one of you as Minister Plenipotentiary, the other as Minister Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, to treat with the Government of the French Republic, on the Subject of the Mississipi, and the Territories Eastward thereof, and without the limits of the United States. The object in view is to procure by just and satisfactory...
The reasonable and friendly views with which you have been instructed by the President to enter into negociations with the French Government justify him in expecting from them an issue favorable to the tranquillity and to the useful relations between the two Countries. It is not forgotten however that these views, instead of being reciprocal, may find, on the part of France, a temper adverse...
Since my last which was of April 18th the tenor of our information from France and Great Britain renders a war between those powers in the highest degree probable. It may be inferred at the same time from the information given by Mr. Livingston and Mr. King that the importance of the United States is rising fast in the estimation both of the French and British cabinets and that Louisiana is as...
Your dispatches including the Treaty and two Conventions signed with a French Plenipotentiary on the 30th of April were safely delivered on the 14th by Mr. Hughes, to whose care you had committed them. In concurring with the disposition of the French Government to treat for the whole of Louisiana although the western part of it was not embraced by your powers you were justified by the solid...
I this moment only receive your letter of the 17th. Mine by this mail renders nothing more necessary in answer to it. I understand Mr. Crawford is so far recovered that he hopes to be on the road for Washington in a few days. His weakness I presume will make his journey very slow. Sending this with some other letters by an extra messenger who will hardly reach the P. Office in time I add only...
I did not receive your favor of Sepr. 2d. the only one yet come to hand, till yesterday. The account of your arrival and reception had some time ago found its way to us thro’ the English Gazettes. The language of your address to the Convention was certainly very grating to the ears of many here; and would no doubt have employed the tongues and the pens too of some of them, if external as well...
I thank you for the copy of your Message. The moderation it breathes towards Spain will be approved generally at present, & universally hereafter. The time is passed when this policy could be ascribed to any other than its true motive. The present standing of the U.S. will secure to it a just interpretation every where. It is very satisfactory to learn that the greatest powers in Europe are...
I have just recd. yours of the 26. and return the projected answer to Adml. Cochrane, with a few pencilled alterations, which you will perceive the Scope of; and adopt, or remodify as you may think best. The last one is intended to obviate the apparent inconsistency occurring to you. The only ground on which the B. Govt. could properly, or prudently call the attention of this to the affair in...
I now return the letters to you from Mr. Purviance & Cambaceres, with an acknowledgment of those in which they were inclosed. The papers last recd. from you in relation to Mr. Skipwith will be of use in establishing one or two material points. His case has been a hard one, but it may be questioned whether he be well founded in the extent of his claims for interest & Agency for Claims. The...
The views with which the U.S. entered into the war, necessarily dispose them to a just peace. The promptitude with which the mediation of H.I.M. was accepted and the purpose of sending ministers to St.P. without waiting for the determination of G.B. is proof of this disposition. An armistice as sparing an effusion of blood, & as contemplating an auspicious result to the mediation, can not...
Your favor of Jany. 26. came duly to hand. The information I wish to be obtained from Genl. Jackson is 1st. What was the form & dates of the appointments of Brigadier, and of Brevet Major General, accepted by him in his letter of June 8th. 1814. to the Secy. of war; and what the date of the Secretary’s letter inclosing the appointments. The term “form” refers to the distinction between...
Yours of the 1st. inst: came on slowly. I return the letter from Mr. Ingersoll whose continued drudgery in his profession, would be to be lamented, if his release from it would ensure such fruits of his literary pen, as one of his discourses to the Society, Philosophical (I think), which contained the ablest & most valuable Tableau of the Condition of the U. S. that has been published. I...
At the request of Mr. R. Harrison, who is well acquainted with the Bearer Mr. James H. Hooe, I introduce this Gentleman to your civilities. He is charged with some business interesting to a friend of Mr. Harrison, which it is supposed may be aided by your advice, and perhaps claim your official attention. These considerations will more than apologize for the liberty I have taken, and will...
Yours of the 21st. is just recd. I am sorry to learn that your health continues to fluctuate, as well as that you are detained from your intended trip, which would doubtless aid it, by the causes you mention. I hope the next information will be more favorable. The omission to sanction the appt. of Commodore Lewis ⟨pr⟩oceeded from a misapprehension of your letter. I thought, on a hasty […] my...
I have recd. a letter from H. Lee dated Nashville Aug. 24. stating that he had corresponded with Genl. Armstrong on the subject of the provisional order to Genl. Jackson of July 18. 1814, authorizing him on certain conditions to take possession of Pensacola; which order was not recd. by the General till on or about the 14th. of March 1815; and then open, and the envelope without postmark; and...
I have the honor to recommend to your attention the case of Messrs Francis and Charles Bradbury, explained in the enclosed document, in order that you may aid them in regaining the proceeds of the sales of their property at Buenos Ayres, if the suggestion of their having passed into the hands of the British, at the capture of the place should prove to be well founded. I have the honor &c. DNA...
I ascribe to the heat of the weather my not having yet had the pleasure of your promised visit. We hope when the obstacle is removed that we shall have the gratification increased by the company of Mrs. Monroe. Among the papers now forwarded is another note from Mr. F. His late ones breathe a spirit which it is difficult to account for without the painful supposition that he believes it not...
14 December 1794, Philadelphia. Introduces Robert S. Van Rensselaer, who “proposes to make a tour through some parts of Europe, and wishes for an opportunity of being made known to you.” RC ( MH ). 1 p. Addressed by JM to Monroe, “Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States / Paris,” and marked “Mr. Van Renselaer.” Calendared as letter not found in PJM Robert J. Brugger et al., eds., The...
I have received from Mr. Graham the Communications to you from Algiers, which being copies I do not return. The course before us is obvious. The ground taken in the last instructions, must be adhered to. The Dey must distinctly understand, that altho’ we prefer peace we are prepared for War; and will make no change in the late treaty, nor concession of any sort to avoid it. It appears from...
Letter not found. Ca. 17 September 1792. Acknowledged in Monroe to JM, 18 Sept. 1792 . Encloses a draft of the article that Monroe revised and Dunlap’s Am. Daily Advertiser published on 22 Sept. Also encloses excerpts from Jefferson’s correspondence that were quoted in this article (see Monroe to JM, 9 Oct. 1792 ).
I have recd. from Mr. Jefferson your letter to him, with the correspondence between Mr. Canning & Mr. Rush, sent for his and my perusal, and our opinions on the subject of it. From the disclosures of Mr. Canning it appears, as was otherwise to be inferred, that the success of France agst. Spain would be followed by attempts of the Holy Alliance to reduce the revolutionized colonies of the...
In my letter of March l8th. to the joint Commission, it was signified that in a Conventional arrangement on the subject of Boundaries, it would be inconsistent with the views of the President, to open any part of Louisiana, to a British trade with the Indians. From the evident solicitude of the British Government on this point, it is highly probable that the determination of the President will...
I have recd. your favor of the 9th. April, which gave us the first notice of your arrival in France. The moment of it, according to the posture of things between the two great rival powers as represented by our Ministers, must have been peculiarly critical. The information cited from King in my public letter marks the source from which the British cabinet begins to take counsel on subjects...
Your last favor was of Mar. 11. The language of Mr. Fox and Mr. Gray, raises very favorable prospects; but I am aware of the difficulties that may occur in settling details as well as in defining general principles. Other members of the Cabinet may also not concur in the liberal dispositions of those gentlemen. This goes by Mr. P. who is charged with the joint commission, and instructions...
The inclosed is of little consequence, but you will see that it ought to have been addressed to you. Dr. Eustis & his lady having given us a call, it was agreed that he & myself shd. make a short visit to Mr. Jefferson of whose state of health, I had never been able to get any precise information. We found him substantially restored from his indisposition, with good appetite, and in the daily...
I have recd. your favors of the 16 & 17. The communication of de Forrest is extremely interesting. The view it gives of the B. policy towards the U.S. is so strikingly just, and so strictly accords with that which has regulated the course of the Executive that it is much to be regretted that his paper is not in a form and is without an authority, to be published. If it had been in the form of...
I inclose a copy of a letter from Messrs Levi Hollingsworth and Co. of Philada, in which they complain that after an unjust sentence of condemnation passed upon their property at Tortola it was so far undervalued that a reversal of the sentence will leave them very considerable losers. If you can aid them, in any advisable mode, to diminish the sacrifice I pray you to do it. But as their case...
Still without authentic information from Abroad. The Halifax papers expect Adml. Warren with a naval force, and an offer of peace. It appears that Wellington has gained a victory over Marmont; The extent of it not ascertained. From the West the accounts are that a B & Indn. force amounting to about 600 left Malden after the surrender of Detroit, to attack F. Wayne, & in case of success, to...
On perusing your letters to Mr. De Neuville, and Mr. Gallatin, some ideas occurred which induced me to put them on paper for your consideration. Those relating to the first letter are interlined with a pencil. Those relating to the 2d. are partly so, & partly penned on a separate sheet. In the communication to Mr. G. I thought it might be not amiss to suggest the several topics which he may...
I have recd yours covering the letters to Mr. Changuion & Genl. P. My hint as to the pecuniary arrangements for tracing the cases of the Negroes carried off was not meant to limit the amt. necessary for so important an object, but to diminish as much as possible the pecuniary discretion and the vague pretensions of the agents, so much perplexity having been experienced from such sources. I am...
After all the vicissitudes through which the assumption has passed, it seems at present in a fair way to succeed as part of the general plan for the public debt. The Senate have included it among their amendments to the funding bill, and a vote of yesterday in the House of Representatives indicates a small majority in favor of the measure. In its present form it will very little affect the...
I have your two favors of the 11 & 15. instant. The letter inclosed in the first is returned, Mr. Livingston having sailed before it could reach N. Y. and the letter for which it was to be substituted, having before gone on to him. The letter inclosed in the latter is also inclosed, with a note at the bottom of it by the President which will serve for an answer. We think the best mode of...
I recd your favor of by Mr. Hughs, the bearer of the public dispatches from you & Mr L. The purchase of Louisiana in its full extent, tho’ not contemplated is received with warm, & in a manner universal approbation. The uses to which it may be turned, render it a truly noble acquisition. Under prudent management it may be made to do much good as well as to prevent much evil. By lessening the...
Neither of the two last posts brought me a line from you. I find one in the office for Mr. Jones who is absent on a visit to King George. I expect him back on Monday next. Our proceedings throughout this week have turned chiefly on the bill for assize Courts, which yesterday passed the H. of D. after a faint opposition and with very few dissenting voices. It is formed pretty much on the...
I this moment receive your favor of the 30th. It gives me much pleasure, that you have so soon got rid of your fever. Whenever you come on you[r] visit to Albemarle, I should be glad to see you, if you could make this a Stage and be reconciled to the little delay it would incur. I can with great conveniency give you a conveyance for the residue of the journey; and if apprized in time wd. have...
I have written several letters of late in which I have been pretty full in my details and remarks. In one of them I acknowledged your letter to Mr. R of Decr. 18. and stated my reasons for not witholding it. I have since recd. the original of that letter sent by the way of Havre, together with the copies of it submitted to my discretion; which I have thought it most consistent with your...
A most distressing picture has been presented to me of the condition of Mr. Cathcart and his numerous family, in the hope that as his official services which have had such a termination, were rendered whilst the Executive administration was in my hands, I might be induced to say something in his behalf. It is impossible to learn his actual distress and alarming prospects without sympathy; but...
Inclosed herewith is the Cypher you are to carry with you. I send it apart from the despatches, because I shall put a few words in them into Cypher. The despatches will probably go off on wednesday morning, or thursday at farthest. They have been delayed by the slowness of Congs. in passing the law for which they waited. I recd. last evening yours of the 22d. & expect to hear further from you...
It being presumed that by the time of your receiving this communication, the Negotiation with which you were charged by my letter of 5th. January last, will no longer require your presence in London, the President thinks it proper that you should now proceed to Madrid, and in conjunction with Mr. Pinckney open a negotiation on the important subjects remaining to be adjusted with the Spanish...
Your favor of July 27. from Plattsburg was duly received, and I am very glad to learn from it, that the fatiguing scenes through which you have passed, had not prevented some improvement in your health. The sequel of your journey will have been still more friendly to it, as affording a larger proportion of the salutary part of your exercise. I hope you will find an ample reward for all the...
I have recd. your letter of the 23d. and learn with much pleasure that you are not disinclined to the Station wch. the one answered by it, presented to your consideration. In discharging the duties of this Station, I am aware that the Functionary must carry into it, a just respect for his own principles, and above all for the dictates of his Conscience. But with the mutual knowledge of our...
In the hurry of acknowledging yours of Ocr. 17. recd. at the last moment of the opportunity for the post office, I did not advert to the passage relating to enquiries to be made of Genl. Jackson. I hope you have not delayed your intended letter to him on that account. I should suppose it might be quite proper to ask from him copies of the documents appointing him Brigadier or Majr. General by...
I have recd. your favor of the 13th. I beg that you will not think of the pecuniary subject till it be in every respect, perfectly convenient to you. The real sense of the nation with regard to the Revolutionary struggle in S. America can not, I should suppose, be mistaken. Good wishes for its success, and every lawful manifestation of them, will be approved by all, whatever may be the...
The turn which our affairs have taken at Madrid renders it expedient in the judgment of the President that you should proceed thither without delay in execution of the instructions heretofore given with such alterations and additions as are contained in this letter. You will of course make such communications to the British Government on your departure, as will guard your mission against...
I have recd. yours of the 7th. You will not doubt that our sympathies have been fully with you during the afflictions which have befallen you. I think you have done well in chusing your present situation, & for the reasons you express. I hope you will experience from it all the improvement which your health needs, and every advantage promised by it. My fear is that the Winter may be too rude...
I have received your favor of the 5th. inst. and have attended to the several objects suggested in it. Mordecai having given up all his effects to the Assignees can do nothing for his creditors. He tells me that a dividend will certainly be made in April & not before, and that he shall pay about 15/. in the pound. I have applied also to Crowley, and having little confidence in my own judgment...
Your favor of the 22d. has been duly recd. I am so much aware that you have not a moment to spare from your public duties, that I insist on your never answering my letters out of mere civility. This rule I hope will be applied to the present as well as future letters. My quere as to the expedition agst. Amelia Island turned solely on the applicability of the Executive Power to such a case....
I have just recd. your favor of this date. I need not express the perfect confidence I feel in the friendly & considerate inducements to your suggestion. But having made definitive preparation for the intended visit; having in no instance omitted it for many years, & the motive being strengthened by the late one recd. by myself, I think the omission, if tested by prudential calculations of a...