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The inclosed resolution of the Senate of the 9th of this month is referred by the President of the United States to the Secretary of War, who is requested to report to the President, to be laid before the Senate, conformably to their request as early as possible. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I have read with attention, and duly considered, your letter of the 1st. of this month, and all the papers inclosed with it, and am of opinion that the public interest, and service requires that the proposed site and Ore be purchased at the best terms, which can be obtained, and a National Foundry for casting Cannon, shot and shells established, and I authorize you, in conjunction with the...
I have received the letter you did me the honor to write me on the sixth day of this month, & consider the requests contained in it as very reasonable. They are readily agreed. I as Sir with much esteem / your most obedient & humble servant MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I request you to transmit copies of the law for reducing the twelve regiments which passed yesterday to Major Generals Hamilton & Pinckney & also to the commandant of brigades with orders to the Major Generals to make immediate arrangements, for reducing those regiments on the fourteenth day of June I pray you also in concert with the Secretary of the Treasury to make seasonable preparations...
The President requests the candid opinion of the Secretary of War, upon the project in the inclosed letter of Col Smith. Whether his request can be granted in whole or in part consistent, with military & political justice & propriety without favor or affection. The P. prays Mr. McHenry to return Smith’s letter. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I have received your note of this date & have read all the papers. This whole business is so entirely new to me, that I have read the documents with great surprize. I highly approve of the proposed enquiry & of your letter to Messrs Shepherd Parks & Ely I am Sir with great esteem MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I have read and considered your report of yesterday & concur with you & the other gentlemen at the heads of department in the propriety of appointing a qualified person to visit & examine into the actual state of the garrisons—Indian trading houses or factories & other public property in the North Western territory on the Missisippi & on the frontiers of Tennesee & Georgia. It has been...
In answer to your Letter of the 24, I can only say that I have referred the Papers relative to extra Services to the Secretary of the Treasury who has not yet reported. That I cannot determine any Thing on Major Tousard’s Claim nor Mr. Dinsmores till some general rule is settled,—Major Tousard however and Mr Dinsmore will have Justice done them. If you approve of the Measure you may send a...
I have received your letter of 23 of this month relative to Col. Smith’s Letter: your letter of this 26th relative to appointments for Major Tousard: Your letter of this date. I shall omit appointing any officer in the Artillery at present excepting Mr: Robins Chamberlain. Your Letter also of this date inclosing a Petition from Robert Gilmore, Esqr: Chairman of the Committee, &ca. All these...
It gives me pleasure to inform you that Mr Boudinotte has been able to effect your exchange for a Doctor Mentzes. Allow me to congratulate you on the event. We are again on the business of a general cartel with Mr Howe He seems inclined to meet us on fair ground. Commissioners from us meet an equal number from him the 10th instant. One great and preliminary point to be settled is the...
Give me leave to congratulate you most heartily on the smiling Aspect our Affairs begin to put on. Yesterday Congress received Despatches from Mr. Bingham, their Agent, in Martinico, which confirm the Accounts of the Defeat of the British Fleet in the West-Indies. The Action was extremely severe; and if Byron , like Sir Henry Clinton , had not taken the Advantage of the Moon , it is more than...
I thank you Dear Mac for your poetry and your confidence. The piece is a good one—your best. It has wit, which you know is a rare thing. I see by perseverence all ladies may be won. The Muses begin to be civil to you, in spite of Apollo and my prognosis. You know I have often told you, you wrote prose well but had no genius for poetry. I retract. Adieu. Steiner, James McHenry Bernard C....
I have, Dear Mac, several of your letters. I shall ⟨soon⟩ have time enough to write ⟨my⟩ friends ⟨as often⟩ as they please. The Great man and I have come to an open rupture. Proposals of accomodation have been made on his part but rejected. I pledge my honor to you that he will find me inflexible. He shall for once at least repent his ill-humour. Without a shadow of reason and on the slightest...
I am much obliged to you for the papers you transmitted me on the subject of Mr. C——e. Nothing gives me greater pleasure on all occasions, than to see suspected and injured innocence vindicated, nor would any person more chearfully retract an ill-founded accusation, on conviction of its error, than myself. You know the motives and the grounds of my charges against Mr. C——e, at a period fertile...
[ Philadelphia, March 8, 1782. “Dr. Mac. I write the above in a form which being copied I wish to appear before the personages concerned.… Whatever may be my general opinion of Mr. Chase, if I find good reason to think him innocent in the present case I shall with great pleasure declare it. You know my informants.” Letter not found. ] ALS , sold at Parke-Bernet Galleries, October 30–31, 1944,...
[ Philadelphia, April 26, 1791. On May 3, 1791, McHenry wrote to Hamilton : “I did not receive your letter of the 26th till the morning of the 2d.” Letter not found. ] McHenry, who had served as George Washington’s secretary during the American Revolution, had attended the Constitutional Convention and the Maryland Ratifying Convention. He was a member of the Maryland Assembly from 1788 to 1790.
Your letter of the 15 of October came duly to hand and an answer has only be[en] delayed through extreme hurry. My views on the point you mentioned cannot have changed and I am glad to know how you stand. All that confidence or attachment on my part could dictate will be employed. But nothing is certain. And nothing ought to be suspended on the event. Indeed I cannot perceive how the one thing...
[ Philadelphia, August 10, 1792. On October 20, 1792, McHenry wrote to Hamilton: “I have just recd your letter of the 10th Ulto.” Letter not found. ] At this time McHenry was a member of the Maryland Senate.
[ Philadelphia, September 23, 1792. On September 30, 1792, McHenry wrote to Hamilton : “I received your letter of the 23.” Letter not found. ]
[ Philadelphia, September 27, 1792. On September 30, 1792, McHenry wrote to Hamilton : “I received … yours of the 27th.” Letter not found. ]
It is a good while My Dear Mac since I have either written to or received a line from you. I embrace the first moment I have been really able to spare to say some things to you which have for some time “lain heavy on my mind.” I have been conscious that I owed you an explanation concerning the issue of a certain Inspectorship and I have meditated it ever since that issue took place. In giving...
I am told the Executive Directory have complained of Mr. Parish our Consul at Hamburgh. Perhaps the complaint may be ill founded but perhaps also he was indiscreet in giving colour for it. Admit too that he is a good man. Yet we must not quarrel with France for pins and needles . The public temper would not bear any umbrage taken where a trifling concession might have averted it. Tis a case...
I have considered the articles of War & rather think the case is not provided for by them. I incline to the opinion that The President ex officio as Commander in Chief has power to order a General Court Martial. But the exercise of this power would be liable to too much question & Criticism to be expedient. What then is to be done? The President has a right to dis⟨miss⟩ Military Officers as...
This will probably be handed you by Mrs De Neuville widow of Mr. De Neuville of Holland a Gentleman who embarked very zealously and very early in the cause of this country—was instrumental in promoting it and as I understand an object of persecution in consequence of it, which was a link in the chain of his pecuniary ruin. I think his widow has a strong claim upon the kindness of our country...
Take my ideas and weigh them of a proper course of conduct for our administration in the present juncture. You have called Congress—tis well. When the Senate meets (which I should be glad to see anticipated) send a Commission extraordinary to France. Let it consist of Jefferson or Madison Pinckney & a third very safe man, say Cabot . Proclaim a Religious solemnity to take place at the Meeting...
I now send you a cursory answer to certain questions. They are imperfect & probably will come too late. But court avocations and distress in the family have prevented any thing better. General Schuyler has been critically ill though now as I hope out of danger. My Brother in law Mr. Rensselaer has just lost a favourite Daughter one & the Eldest of two Children without a prospect of more. The...
To The first.   It is difficult to fix the precise point at which indignity or affront from one state to another ceases to be negotiable without absolute humiliation and disgrace. It is for the most part a relative question—relative to the comparitive strength of the parties—the motives for peace or war—the antecedent relations—the circumstances of the moment as well with regard to other...
Situated as I am at this moment I am obliged to confine myself to very general hints respecting the paper of the 15 of April. As to the first head—I think it will be adviseable that the Speech should be confined to the foreign Affairs of the Country giving the primary & prominent place to those with France. This will make the main business the more striking. Domestic matters may follow in...
Inclosed are some papers, which were sent me shortly after my return to this City from Philadelphia but which from Mrs. Hamilton’s situation hurry of business &c have been forgotten. If there is any thing to be said to my correspondent you will enable me as speedily as possible to say it. I send you the 100 Dollars you sent me and a further sum to reimburse some money paid for me by Lewis ....
The President of the U S. requests the Secy of State, the Secy of the treasury, the Secy of War and the Atty. general to take into consideration the state of the nation and its foreign relations especially with France. These indeed may be so connected with these, with England Spain Holland and others that perhaps the former cannot be well weighed without the other. If our Envoys extraordinary...
It may serve to prepare the way for a direct answer to the questions stated by the President to make some preliminary observations. 1   It is an undoubted fact that there is a very general and strong aversion to War in the minds of the people of this Country—and a considerable part of the community (though even this part has been greatly alienated from France by her late violent conduct...
Yours of yesterday with its inclosure are come to hand & will be attended to as speedily as possible. I take the liberty to trouble you with the inclosed to receive the amount (which though the accumulated interest on all my Stock from the beginning of the funding system will be short of 200 Dollars). When received, pay yourself one hundred, our friend Lewis seven, & deliver the rest to...
I regret that my occupations have not permitted me to give your report more than a cursory reading, before my being obliged to leave the city for Albany. I have put it under a cover addressed to you. If it cannot conveniently wait my return, which will be in a fortnight, it will be sent you upon a line directed to Mr. “James Inglis at Col Hamilton’s No. 26 Broad Way N York.” desiring him to...
I have received your letter of the instant. Not having seen the law which provides the Naval Armament , I cannot tell whether it gives any new power to the President that is any power whatever with regard to the employment of the Ships. If not, and he is left on the foot of the Constitution, as I understand to be the case, I am not ready to say that he has any other power than merely to employ...
Our citizens are extremely anxious that some further measures for their defence should take place. Do me the favour to inform me confidentially what means are actually in the disposition of your department for this purpose when & how they will be applied. Yrs truly A Capt Hacker formerly of our Navy is desirous of being employed. One or two good men have recommended him to me. It seems however...
We have carefully attended to the subjects presented to our consideration, by your note of yesterday and now offer to you the result of our reflections. The idea of a succession of batteries from the Hook, to the City, very naturally occurs in contemplating the defence of this port, and doubtless has advantages. It would present dangers in the approach which may be expected to have...
Your letter of the 20th. instant, inclosing one from General Washington came to hand this day. The object you suggest in it is one, which no doubt deserves a primary attention; and it will be paid to it. But it will be useful, that I should shortly confer with you fully on a variety of subjects, and after receiving an official communication of my appointment, I shall without delay, repair to...
I last Evening had the honor of receiving your letter of the 25 instant, announcing to me my appointment as Inspector and Major General. At a crisis like the present I esteem it my duty to obey the call of the Government. Feeling too, as I ought, the value of the high confidence which is reposed in me, I beg you to convey to The President my most cordial acknowlegements and the assurance of my...
I send you a number of applications for Military appointments with br[i]ef notes of my opinion. Allow me to remind you in writing of my nephew Philip Church whom I warmly recommend for a Captaincy in the Infantry. He is the eldest son of his father, has had a good education is a young man of sense of genuine spirit and worth—of considerable expectation in point of fortune. I shall esteem his...
Scruples of delicacy have occasionned me to hesitate about offering to you certain ideas which it appears to me on mature reflection cannot be witheld consistently either with friendship to you or regard to the service. They are these— I observe you plunged in a vast mass of details. I know from experience that it is impossible for any man whatever be his talents or diligence to wade through...
Inclosed are sundry recommendations for appointments with notes of mine concerning them. I do not recollect whether I have heretofore mentioned to you Mr William Armstrong. This gentleman was a British Officer and served in the British army in America last War. But for a number of years he has been a citizen of this State—having also married in America and being the father of a Family. He...
I have recieved your letter dated on the 25th. ultimo, informing me that the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, had been pleased to appoint me a Major General in the Army. Impressed as I am with the conviction, that our Country, is about to enter into a Contest in which its existence as an independent nation will be involved, I should promptly...
An absence from the City, upon some urgent avocations, prevented my receiving ’till yesterday your letters of the 10th & 11th instant. I observe the suggestion which you have made to the President, towards calling General Knox and myself into immediate service. If he shall approve, I stand ready to execute in the best manner I shall be able, whatever business, may be confided to me. But I must...
I write you herewith an official letter. Your private one of the 13th is before me. I regret that you have been unwell and rejoice that you are better. The affair of General Knox perplexes me. I wish him to serve. I am pained to occasion to him pain, for I have truly a warm side for him, and a high value for his merits. But my judgment tells me, and all I consult confirm it, that I cannot...
You will herewith receive the list mentioned in mine of yesterday. The names marked with an * are those which engage my preference as last ascertained. The list comprises the names you sent me and some others which have come directly to me. Besides these there are a number of applications with my Remarks upon them which were put up in a packet and either transmitted to you or delivered to Mr....
Subalterns 1 Nathaniel Paulding West Chester would prefer Artillery Mr . Hale refers to me speaks hyhly A probably a good Lieutantnt AH 2 John Treat Irving would prefer Artillery B Mr. Hale 3 Timothy Shalor Albany County
Subalterns 1 Timothy Mountford Philadelphia 5 Silvester G Whipple Livemore Education & good family Hampton 23 years Gordon collegiate education & has read law eleven mon respectable Whipple Father —[sprightly & active] 6 William S Thorne Londonderry
Subalterns 5 Marmaduke Wait Windsor ☞ 25 year Payne Young Gentleman heretofore recomd by Morris & himself pretty good 2 Morris —education common morals good active enterprising Cadet 9 John H Brownson Father Brigadier General Lyon Nothing
Subalterns 6 Robert Hunt son of A Hunt Trenton Lieutenant   Qr Cavalry } Stockton
LIEUTENANTS & ENSIGNS John S Porter McPherson Probably good Ensign Philadelphia Francis Johnson   Inquire of Chester David Denny perhaps Lt. Young & writes a good hand & good English Archibald D Davis Lancaster Young Dennis Wheelen David Denny do Elija Griffiths Richard Thomas