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The expressions of esteem contained in the letter you have taken the trouble to write me, are very dear to me: notwithstanding your advanced age I cherish the hope of being permitted to see you again, and of saying a few words to you on the Subject of my somewhat extended travels, which are rather out of the usual course. I am at present examining a very interesting Country, where the Potomac...
The death of the late Chief Justice Marshall having justly produced a great sensation & a desire to retain every memento of so great a man, many resolutions on the subject have been passed by different bodies: the Bar of this city have decided to procure a portrait. You may perhaps remember that Mr. Marshall wrote you pending the session of the Virginia Convention in Richmond to revise or...
You will, doubtless, think me guilty of much assurance, as I certainly am, to address a note to so honored and worthy a gentleman as you, without ever having seen you, and consequently having no acquaintance with you as a private gentleman. But I have, thank God, been a youthful witness and admirer of all your virtuous deeds and services as a public officer and Chief Magistrate of a Free...
Casting around an enquiring look for the Causes which have lead to our present Internal National Embarrassments ; I find, next to the main or principal Cause, the total want of qualification in the President, is, the admission on the part of some of our ablest Statesmen, that the National Bank is Unconstitutional—The Cabal 1. finding this a weak Point, immediately attempted its subjugation—But...
I have two members watching the progress of the Registration and Impressment Bills; and I shall leave to the Press to inform you what is passing in publick on that subject with the more Confidence; as I presume the Editors in the U. S. will suffer nothing bearing upon it to escape them. The enclosed Copy of a Letter, I have sent to Lord John Russell, will show the project which I had suggested...
(Private) By this day’s Mail I beg leave to forward you a copy of an address delivered by me on the Anniversary of the 19th of April 1775, of which I ask your acceptance. I take this occasion I hope you will not think too presumptuously, to make a suggestion to you which has been long in my mind. I had hoped to have had an opp’y of doing it in a personal interview at the close of the last...
Your volumes of newspapers, which I return by the stage to morrow, I have kept an unreasonable time—but in truth I found that they communicated so much information which it was important for me to possess, and which I could obtain no where else, that I ventured to trespass thus on your goodness. The delay was somewhat increased by an injury which one of them sustained in its binding by a fall...
I beg leave again to obtrude upon you not only with my acknowledgements for transmitting the copies of my fathers letters in compliance with my request, but with a fuller solicitation which grows out of your former goodness. I mentioned to my friend Chancellor Kent, who is our Law Professor in this College, the circumstances of my fathers’ having enclosed in one of his letters to you, a letter...
I have had the honour of receiving your favour of the 5th Inst. and beg leave to tender my grateful & respectful thanks for your obliging compliance with my request—and to assure that your injuctions against the publicity you deprecate shall be scrupulously observed. I lament that I have not found amongst my fathers papers the letters to him from yourself referred to in your letter—nor have I...
The name of the Writer of this Letter will perhaps recur to your Memory. Tho many many Years have passed, I cannot but hope that the name of Alexander Quarrier, of Richmond Virga. is not forgotten. He is now numbered with the dead, and his son now comes in behalf of his Widow, to ask, if in your opinion she is entitled to any thing from our Country, for his services, rendered during the...