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I have the honour to inform you that at a stated meeting of the American Historical Society of Military and Naval Events "held in the City of NewYork on the sixth day of this present month you were, by a unanimous vote of said Society, elected an Honorary Member thereof. With great respect—I am, Sir Your Obedient Servant RC ( DSI : National Museum of American History).
Having some time ago obtained your permission to inscribe my life of Mr. Jefferson to you, I herewith send you a copy of the form in which I shall execute my purpose, if no part of it is deemed objectionable by you. The printing of the 1st. vol. proceeds so slowly, in consequence of the loss of time in transmitting the proof sheets between this place & Philadelphia, it will be 3 or 4 weeks now...
Lieut. Hudson of the Navy has just given me in charge for you the enclosed Diploma of Honorary Membership of the United States Naval Lyceum, which, admitting of convenient transmission thro’ the mail, I have now the honor to forward to you. We have seen, with great concern, from some recent notices in the news-papers, that your health, of late, has not been as good as usual. I trust, however,...
I hope you will not deem my addressing you an intrusion; but I am compelled by my necessities to do so. I am at present receiving but one dollar per day—in the Navy Yard at this place, which is not sufficient to supply myself and family with the necessaries of life. I am now eighty & odd years of age, and having filled the station which I did for thirty & odd years, I think it a great hardship...
I feel it to be my first and most grateful duty on my return from the delightful pilgrimage to the shrine of Montpelier to enquire after your health & welfare which I hope Mrs. Madison or Miss Payne may be good enough to write a line to inform me of without troubling you. It has given no little poignancy to the great regret I experienced at being obliged to leave your residence to attend to...
’L’amitié d’un grand homme est un bienfait des dieux’--Voltaire I am not certain that I have transmitted to you the following resolution unanimously adopted before the Institution of Laurenceville—If I have please pardon the freedom I have taken— "Resolved—That this Society, view with emotions of gratitude, the high regard entertained for its members by the Hon James Madison. John Q Adams....
I had the honor to receive your favour respecting the correspondence between yourself and Mr. Jeremy Bentham—in reply to some enquiries which I took the liberty of proposing to you. Will you excuse me when I further ask you to inform whether there have been any other proposals to codify your Law: who were the individuals proposing it and if their works were ever published to the world. I hope...
Allow me to present to you my Son Mr. Smith T. Van Buren—who is desirous of paying his respects to you. Wishing to be affectionately remembered to Mrs. Madison I am Dear, [Sir] very truly yours RC (University of Pennsylvania Library).
I have come thus far with a design long cherished to afford myself the gratification of paying you and Mrs. Madison a visit at Montpellier. Our friend Gov. Coles on whom I called for the purpose before leaving Philadelphia has apprised me of the way. I find here that the steamboat for Fredericksburg leaves Washington every morning at six oclock which will enable me I understand to reach Orange...
It is probable that I shall go abroad about the end of next month to divide a twelvemonth between France & England. From patriotic motives & personal attachments I intend to publish in Paris or London from time to time Sketches Biographical & Bibliographical, of the most eminent among the living writers & intelligences of our country. I wish to obtain now, accordingly, suitable memoranda—mere...
A few days after the date of my late letter to you, I heard that Gen: Armstrongs Book was in the press at NewYork, & would soon be published. I heard to day that it had been received here, & went immediately in pursuit of it. I have just procured it & hasten to forward it to you, not having taken time to look into it I have only time to return you my thanks for your letter of April 10. and to...
I hardly know how sufficiently to express the very great delight and instruction I derived from the days your hospitality permitted me to spend under your roof. They will ever be remembered as among the happiest of my life. Mr Van Buren has this moment put into my hands the first volume of Armstrong’s work on the late war. I remember you expressed a curiosity to see it, & I beg leave to...
I am about to trouble you in a matter of delicacy and of interest. I do so, not without great reluctance: indeed nothing could impel me to it, but what I consider an imperious duty to a friend, and to truth. Mr. Smith, the competitor of Mr. Slaughter, in the Senatorial Canvass, asserted on thursday last, at a publick meeting, in the upper part of this county, as a gentleman of intelligence and...
Having made a partial collection of the autographs of distinguished individuals, the undersigned would feel extremely gratified, if he could add yours to the number. Also, if it would not be asking too great a favor, the undersigned would feel exceedingly happy, if you would at the same time enclose the autographs of Jay and Hamilton , or whatever other distinguished contemporary and friend of...
The enclosed letter from Col: Ch: Todd was recd. to day. I have an imperfect recollection of the conversation as well as of the subject alluded to. I have however of certain remarks made by you at the time, & repeated frequently since, respecting Genl. Armstrong’s conduct on recieving the resignation of Gen’l Harrison, and as I have an impression on my mind that you noted the circumstances at...
Professor Palfrey of Harvard College being desirous of paying his respects to you on his return to Boston from Louisiana, I take great pleasure in introducing him to your personal acquaintance—His character is no doubt already well known to you. I beg leave to present my respects to Mrs. Madison & to subscribe myself your respectful & obed. Servt. RC (DLC) .
I do myself the honour of sending you a pamphlet explanatory of the proceedings of the late commission under the treaty with France, of which I have printed a few copies for distribution. I have no hope that your leisure will permit you to examine it; but I offer it to your acceptance as a testimonial of the profound respect with which I am, Your very obedient and faithful servant, RC (DLC) .
As a Stranger, I ought not, by the laws of courtesy, to intrude myself on your notice. But in offering for your acceptance a copy of a Discourse delivered before the Government of this State on the day of Annual Election last past, I cherish the hope that you will permit me to accompany it, with an expression of my grateful admiration of the illustrious services, which you have rendered to our...
I desired very much to have had the pleasure of paying my respects to yourself & Mrs. Madison on my way to Washington, but the necessity of my being there with as little delay as possible & the almost impassable state of the roads, (which has compelled me to leave Mrs. Rives behind, to follow me when she can), have deprived me of that satisfaction. It has given me great pleasure to learn that...
Will you do me the favour of informing me whether or not the correspondence between yourself & my illustrious fellow country man Jeremy Bentham on the codification of American laws was ever published. If so when, where, and under what title it was given to the world. An answer will oblige. Your Excellency’s hle Sert. RC (DLC) .
While I feel that, as an utter stranger, I am taking a very great liberty with you when I address you upon a subject in which you cannot be supposed to feel the smallest interest yet am I assured that if it be in your power to serve me you will take pleasure in doing it. The object of this is to learn from you if you can give me any information respecting an individual who was employed by you...
I beg leave to refer you to the foregoing statement of the organization of our Society, and of its objects; and also, respectfully to ask leave to present your name, at our first quarterly meeting, (on the first Monday in March,) as an Honorary Member. Yours, &c. RC and enclosures (DLC) . Enclosures are printed documents from the American Historical Society of Military and Naval Events.
In attempting to write the Life of my Father in law, the late Chief Justice Ellsworth, I am under the necessity of resorting for materials to the small remnant yet with us, of that venerable band of Patriots and Statesmen who were colabourers with him in the organization of our Government—For that purpose I take the liberty to address you at this time—And were it not for the great distance...
I feel extremely obliged to you for the polite manner in which you have been pleased to notice my letter. I will further add I was induced to address you on the subject as the President of the society, not thinking at the moment I was addressing one of the framers of the Constitution, although a moments reflection would have told me that was the case, which makes your silence on the subject...
Permit a friend & relative, though a stranger, to address you upon a subject deeply interesting to every child of Adam. Before entering upon it, I would remark as a part of my apology that I am by profession a minister of the Gospel of the Presbyterian Church, & a little allied to your family. My mother is a sister to Col. James Madison of Prince Edward now in the legislature, with whom I...
I am requested by the Board of Managers of the Washington National Monument Society to ask the favor of your signature, as President of the Society, to the accompanying memorial to the General Assembly of Virginia, if you should approve it; and to give it such aid as in your judgment may be proper, and as it may be convenient for you to give. Permit me, Sir, to congratulate myself upon the...
I had the honor, yesterday, to receive your favor of the 31st. ulto. enclosing a letter from Mr. McCleland of Balto. communicating his ideas respecting the Washington Monument, and shall lay it before the Board of Managers. At the meeting of the Board on the 3d. instant, a resolution was proposed to advertise for plans & estimates; but as we cannot yet form a correct idea of the amount of the...
I beg leave to present to you the accompanying speech, in which I have endeavored to maintain the right of petition, as it is recognised in the Constitution. It is not probable that I should have troubled the House with my views on the subject, but for my knowledge of the debates of 1790 in reference to a very similar occasion, and the reliance I placed on the opinion which you then expressed,...
The friends of free principles in the first Congressional district of Ohio in manifestation of their Joy for the emanicipation of their country from the thraldom of the United States Bank the charter of which expires on the 3d. March next have resolved to celebrate the following as the first day of the second great era of American Independance—And as well in high admiration of your Character...
Your long intimacy with Mr. Jefferson, your accordance with him in the principles of civil government, your cordial co-operation in carrying those principles into effect, and lastly, the kindness with which you have answered my inquiries and guided my researches, make it peculiarly proper that I should address to you the following pages. In submitting to you the biography of that friend of...
Sir as the society for the purpose of raising a Monument (called the National Monument society and of which you are President) to the father of our country have set forth their views upon that subject and is their wish it should be commenced within a few months and finished in the course of eight or ten years and that their desire is it should be like him who it is meant it should commemorate...
Though I regret that I have not the honor of knowing You personally, I trust you will excuse the liberty I now take in making you a request I collected with the greatest care & labour a curious collection of autographs for a gentleman of distinguished standing in the British Parliament who is passionately fond of the relics of men who have rendered themselves illustrious by their virtues...
It would have given me great pleasure to have delivered the inclosed communication in person—but the gratification is denied to me— I beg you to be assured of the deep respect, and most enduring regard of one, who has always sustained your principles, and venerated your character Your most ob. Sert— FC (DLC) .
Until a few weeks ago, I counted with certainty on making my usual pilgrimage to Montpellier during this visit to the U. States. But circumstances beyond my control have put it out of my power, and I am now hastening to New Orleans, by the Way of Charleston, Augusta & Mobile, in company with Septimia Randolph, who has already suffered such effects from the cold weather as to make her friends...
Since my arrival here I received from Mr Charles Vaughan of Hallowell, State of Maine, a paper of the finest kind of Cuba Tobacco Seed, which has been recently sent to him by a friend at the Havanna—and he desired me to distribute it in any way that I thought it could be most gratifying and useful—enjoining it upon me at the same time, that I should first present a portion of it to You as a...
It gives me great pleasure to acknowledge your kind favour of this day, the payment of twenty doll : on your subscription to the Coll’g We hope not to fail in our present struggle, but still are quite liable to—Yours, Sir With the deepest Respect— RC (NjP) .
I have so often made myself troublesome to you by my requests, that it is with no little hesitation, that I have determined to ask of you yet another favor, especially as the request I am about to make is altogether of a delicate nature. In consequence of the reduced state of my health, I expect in the course of a few days to sail for Europe to be absent probably till next summer. It has...
You will pardon me for intruding on your attention a few lines Relative to a subject in which every American Citizen should feel a deep interest. On the demise of the late Chif Justice Marshal you were appointed his successor as President of the ’Washington National Monument Society’. In a recent number of Niles Register I see an address to the American people by order of the Board of...
Upon my arrival at home I discover that I cannot find the Letters referred to in the enclosed letter from Mr. Smith, and as his object is to republish them, I hope you will be good enough to lend him the use of any copies you may be able to spare him for the purpose, or to point his attention to the places where he may obtain them. The new office in which I am now engaged gives me unremitted...
The relation in which you stand to the Constitution of the United States has emboldened me to send an humble attempt of mine to defend it. It is with regret that I have seen in the public papers some accounts of your suffering health. This may render the controversies of the day very uninteresting to you—I have only to urge in apology for my intrusion my earnest desire to shew that even if...
Mr James Madison 1834 To James Shepherd Dr June 14 To 13th Sole pr Mr Brockman 1/6 $325 " " 1 Side Red Leather Ao 16/6 2,75 July 12 " 2 tt Sole Leather oiled for 15 " 11 3/4 tt Harness ⅌ Ben —,50 15 " 11 3/4 tt Sole ⅌ Mr Brock 1/6 2,94 $ 9, 44 1835 Sept 28th Recd payt of Mr Sim Brockman by James V. Shepherd RC ( ViU ).
I have received yours of the 8th. with a draft on Peyton & Dennis, for the sum of $174 55/100 which has been disposed of as directed. I am Very respy Your Obt. St RC ( PPPrHi ).
I am well aware, My Dear Uncle, of the numerous calls upon your attention, yet as I am convinced it will not be withheld when any essential benefit can be derived from its engagement, I have been tempted to address you. It is to consult you on a subject too nearly connected with my future prospects to permit me to come to a decision without the advice of one, whose experience & good wishes for...
I received your very kind attention, which I ought scarcely to have anticipated from one so much above the most of mankind and so highly esteemed by all. I am entirely unable to express the thanks which I deeply feel are due for so great a favor. I have long wished to possess something from the pen of your honored self directed to me, even tho’ it were no more than your great name, which I...
I have the honor to present to you a Silver medal which I have had struck commemorative of the Certificate which you Signed in aid of the Glorious cause of Temperance on which are Symbols of the happy effects of Temperance and of the direful effects of Intemperance and on the reverse the Certificate with facsimiles of the Signatures thereto and I beg your acceptance of it and am with profound...
Your favor of the 2d. inst gave me great satisfaction, I thank to you very much for your kindness of recommending me for the Professorship vacant at the Virginia University. I have since written to Mr: Joseph C: Cabell, Rector of it, in more detail, as by the Prospectus the place is to be filled by the 1.st Septr. I delayed troubling you again upon it, to try if possible to save from...
Your favour of the 2d. inst. was handed to me at the post office in Richmond, shortly after my return on the 16th from a short and hasty journey to the North. It did not find me at the University as you expected. I was unable to attend the last meeting of the Visitors, in consequence of my absence on the journey to which I have referred, which I deemed of higher obligation in the circumstances...
I have the honor to inform you that you have been, this day, unanimously elected President of the Washington National Monument Society, in the place of our late lamented President, your friend & co-patriot, Chief Justice Marshall. That great and good man felt a deep interest in the object of this association; the erection of a great National Monument to the memory of him who was "first in...
I have long since intended writing to you to let you know that altho we are situated at a distance I have not forgotten our early friendship and the esteem in which I continue to hold you in my sincere and affectionate rememberance—I have not been wanting in my frequent enquiries in reguard to your & your families health—I am gratified to hear by the late information I have recd., that it is...
I have been near committing a great Faux pas. The Times of the 9th reported merely that the Seamen’s Enlistment Bill went through the Committee and the report was ordered to be received on Wednesday following. As none of the points were discussed in the House I concluded of course that it was the Bill of Sir James Graham to which Lord John Russell had before assented and which in my letter to...