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21 January 1785 . JM was nominated twice by Jefferson in 1784 for membership in this society ( Boyd, Papers of Jefferson Julian P. Boyd et al., eds., The Papers of Thomas Jefferson (18 vols. to date; Princeton, N. J., 1950——). , VI, 542, 556). He was elected to membership on this day along with Manasseh Cutler, Thomas Paine, Richard Price, Joseph Priestly, and twenty-four others ( Pa. Gazette...
I am very sory that I had not the pleasure of seeing you in Baltimore on your way to Congress. The Inclosed, will I hope excuse the liberty of Addressing a Gentlemen on business of a Public Nature, to whom I am not known. On receiving Mr McHenry’s Note to you I purposed to follow you, and Mr Lee, as far as Mr Scarrets Tavern, but Mrs Ballards indisposition prevented. Sir, to be as brief as...
Influenc’d by the best motives, friendship for you and love for my Country, I take the liberty of writing to you. The Proceedings of our Assembly no doubt you are acquainted with. It is here believ’d that a Majority of that Body under the Controul of —— are disposed to do every thing they can to disappoint & hurt your feelings. The Counties annexed to yours are arranged so, as to render your...
Prompted by the good of my Country, I hope will sufficiently apologize for my addressing you on some matters of very great importance to our Country. Government at present is certainly in a very confused and unhinged situation, and no doubt calls for the deliberate efforts of a wise Legislature, which I hope is the case at this day. Yet Sir Your knowledge of mankind and things in general must...
I have been happy in forming the acquaintance of Mr. Mazzey, & receiving at the Same time your letter dated 3d. June 1784. He is now on his way to france where I know he will find many friends. Mr. Jepherson one of them is generally esteemed in paris & Versailles, & I have no doubt but his appointment as a minister to our court will give great Satisfaction. The opinion in paris is that peace...
Letter not found. 19 May 1785. Noted in the lists probably made by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany). No other reference to it has been found.
In appealing to your Candor I feel a confidence that no apology will be necessary for the present mode of address. Before I left Virginia I communicated to my good friend Mr: Randolph, the reasons that induced me to become a Candidate for the appointment of Clerk to the House of Representatives of the United States, and for that purpose to relinquish the public situation in which I stood...
I will make no Apology to you for the small Portion of Time that the Perusal of this letter may claim from more valuable Avocations. By Letters I have received from Europe, I am induced to think that Strong Impressions on the public Mind, will be made by the first legislative Acts of Congress, which will display in Some Measure, the Character of our new Government. I am afraid we Shall be...
I have the honor, as well as great Pleasure, of enclosing a diploma from the College of New Jersey, whereby you will find the Trustees of that Institution, have not been unmindful of the Obligations the public owe you for past Services. May you long enjoy the public Favour while they reap the benefit of your valuable Labours. Dr. Witherspoon gave me a Letter directed to you to send with the...
Tho’ I have not the honor of personaly knowing You, the benevolence of Your Character emboldens me to trouble You with a few lines to solicit Your power, and Influence with the Assembly of the States, in behalf of my Infant Son, whoes case is so truely hard! I will not trouble You with a long detail: but refer You to the Petition and Memorial presented by me, and the Two Gentlemen who are...
I congratulate you upon the success of that inestimable Constitution which I had the honor to witness your support and approbation of; and it is with pleasure I find you are entitled to a share in the deliberations consequent of it’s adoption. I take the liberty, Sir, to solicit the favor of your interest to the appointment of a Collector of Duties and Imposts; this being the only Commercial...
I was honord a few days ago by your favor of the 27th. May for which accept my thanks. It gives me no small concern to find that the People of Kentucky are not to expect your Assistance in the important Business of framing a Constitution which they have so shortly in View. At the time I took the liberty to trouble you with the request I was well aware of the multiplicity of your engagements,...
I arrived here last evening much fatigued with my Journey. The Roads were much worse than usual occasioned by excessive rains, the Stages rather indifferent & I was so unfortunate as to have to travel the whole distance without any company except my Servant. I have no prospect of a passage from hence down the River in any short time shall therefore set out by land immediately after Breakfast...
I have had the honor to receive your favors of the 9th. & 21st. of April for which accept my thanks. My hopes respecting the Success of the new Constitution in Virginia are in some measure revived by the information you have given me upon that Subject but am still sorry to find that the number of friends & foes are so nearly divided as to render the Vote of Kentucky of critical importance for...
I was this day duely favord with yours of the 24th. of Septr. & the 12th. of October for which accept my thanks. The Convention elected pursuant to the recommendati[o]n of the late Convention met at this place the 1st. Instant & came to a determination that it was most advisable for this District to renew there application to the State of Virga. for an Independent Government—agreeable to the...
I herewith inclose you two Letters which were this Morning brought for you to our Lodgings—also the News Papers of this day which contain all intelligence in circulation here worthy your Notice. The French Packett arrived a day or two ago (being the first since you left us). I hear it has brought some public Dispatches but am not yet inform’d of their Contents. Nine States have not appeard in...
Supposing that it might not be unacceptable; I have taken the liberty of enclosing you an extract from the Ordinance of Congress, for Regulating the Post Office &ca concerning the powers given the Post Master General, respecting the carriage of News papers by the Posts. Wishing at the same time (when you have leisure) that you would please to mention the circumstance to the other Gentlemen of...
I suppose that you have been made acquainted before this with the several acts which have passed the legislature of Virga. for the purpose of organizing the new Government. You have no doubt been informed that this State is divided into ten districts, each to choose a representative in the new Congress, on the second day of February next. The district in which Orange is included, consists of...
The Assembly have proceeded with so much tardiness that notwithstanding the length of time we have been convened our Journals furnish but little which would merit your attention. We have been more engaged in rejecting than in adopting the various political projects which have been proposed. The instalment plan was at first received with much seeming approbation. But ever since its first...
Mrs. Carr was informed by Mr Jefferson, previous to his departure to Europe, that he had requested the favor of you, to direct the Studies of her two sons Peter & Dabney in his absence. Should it be convenient for you to comply with Mr Jeffersons request, Mrs. Carr will be much obliged to you to inform her, when, and in what manner you would wish them disposed of. I am with great respect, Sir,...
Being neither acquainted with your Secretary at War, nor Doctor White the Superintendant for the Southren Department, I have taken the liberty to request your notice to the affairs of the Southren Indians which are now in such a state, that the Spaniards on one hand and other improper intruders on the other, may excite them all to become our enemies; or at best useless friends, whereas a...
An early acquaintance, a similarity of sentiment, and the deserved estimation you have attained to, in America, encourage me to address you on a subject, that is believed to be highly interesting to the Western Inhabitants, and perhaps not less so, to the eastern parts of the State. After various essays of the People for a separation, and the subject being agitated, both in Congress, and...
As few things in this life can go nearer my heart, than danger to the American Union. For some days past I have revolved in my mind the late intelligence from a Member of Congress, and some information, by another hand. I have also reflected on intimations I had from a friend in Ireland, which I think I give you a hint of last year: at times I conclude it the best policy that our leaders...
On my way to this place I met a Man from the Settlement on Cumberland River in North Carolina who had just come in by the way of Kentuckey. He informs that the minds of all the Western People are agitated on Account of the proposed cession of the Mississippi Navigation to Spain. Every person talks of it with i[n]d[i]gnation and reprobates it as a Measure of the greatest Injustice and Despotism...
Being cut off from the occurrences in the Assembly I have nothing to write you upon, but the prospect as to my reelection. The Apostacy of one of our Delegates in the Convention, and the wavering conduct of the other, have re-animated the Spirit of Anti-federalism in the County to such a degree that much work is to be done before my object will be secured —the issue of the ten days for which...
My going to Virginia this winter is indispensible. It is probable, from the state in which events has placed the delegation, that I shall not have an opportunity of going after the session commences without leaving the state unrepresented. Upon these considerations I have determined to seize the present moment and shall set out early in the next week. In the mean time I think it proper to give...
The Election for Senators came on yesterday and terminated as I gave you some reason to apprehend in my last—the Ballots were as follow: for R. H. Lee 98, for Wm. Grayson 86, for Jas. Madison 77 the whole number of Voters was 162, 62 whereof were given singly to you, of those Cast away Mr. H. got 26, and the remainder were distributed to many others. I am confident that two thirds of the...
The Gentlemen who have arrived from the Convention inform us that you are on the way to join us—least, however, you may, under a supposition that the State of the delegation is such as to admit of your absence, indulge yourself in leisurely movements, after the fatiguing time you have had, I take this precaution to apprise you that the same schism which unfortunately happened in our State in...
With great pleasure I received your favor of the 20th. Ult, but being distant from Town it did not reach me until about two days ago—the bad weather and other circumstances prevented my being in Richmond at the time of the meeting of the Electors—you have doubtless learned e’er this, that it was not my duty to be there—the antifederalism of my district would have kept out any person whatever...
I arrived here on Wednesday night last, and have as yet had but little opportunity to sound the people in any part of the Country upon the constitution. The leaders of the opposition appear generally to be preparing for a decent Submission—the language amongst them is, that amendments must be tried if there should, at the setting of the convention, be a prospect of carrying them down in a...