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    • Grayson, William
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    • Madison, James
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    • Confederation Period

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Documents filtered by: Author="Grayson, William" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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I am afraid my silence since I came to this place has giv’n you some reason to suspect me to be impregnated with that vis inertiæ, which has been so often attributed to me. The only apology I have to make, is that I wish’d to have some thing to write to you worth your acceptance. However as there would be some danger in risquing a farther delay, I shall give you what I have in the manner. The...
I did myself the pleasure some time since of writing to you; and I expect by this time you have recieved my letter; since which nothing has happened of any consequence except the passage of the Land Ordinance & the arrival of Don Diego de Gardoqui at Philadelphia. I inclose you a copy of the Ordinance: & if it is not the best in the world, it is I am confident the best that could be procured...
I have recieved your favor of the 29. May acknowledging the receipt of my first letter, though making no mention of the last, which I presume has not yet come to hand. Since the date thereof the affair of the treaty with the Western Indians which was decided on the 18th. March last, has been opened again & very much canvassed; the result however is that the treaty is to be held; & for the...
Your favor of has come to hand; I am sorry to hear the doctrine of paper money begins to rear up it’s head in our State. This subject has been so well investigated at different periods that I can hardly think any reasonable man can advocate it, unless for the purpose of advancing some object of interest; I remember in the old Government that our exchange rose to 65 P Ct. This alarmed the...
I opened your letter directed to Colo. Monroe in the first instance, & forwarded the inclosed letters to France, in the public Mail, as I could not hear of any private gentlemen going to whom I could with propriety intrust them. I have recieved your letter from Philada. & I heartily wish it may suit your Convenience to visit this place, as it will give me particular satisfaction to have the...
I have recieved your letter dated at Philada. & shall forward the in-closure to France in the manner you direct. Since your departure, we have been under great anxiety for the fate of Mr. Hardy. On a party to Haerlem heights about ten days ago, he unfortunately bursted a blood vessel, and from frequent hemorrhages, has been in extreme danger till about three days ago, when matters have taken...
The President being this moment about to set out for Virginia obliges me to be very short at present. We have no authentic advices from Europe respecting the Algerine War, although the Papers speak of several captures of american vessels. Nothing new from Mr. Adams respecting the debts. I will again look at his letters, & give you the necessary information in confidence. You will then judge...
On inquiring at the Office for F. A. I find it is uncustomary to give copies unless by special direction of Congress, a circumstance I did not advert to, when I was writing to you last. I shall therefore give you the best information in my power from memory. Mr. A. says that a Commee. of merchts. from Glasgow waited on him in London & told him their business was to lay the affair of the debts...
I wrote you by the last Post, since which other letters have arrived from the gentleman therein mentioned. They came by the last packett; and one is dated as late as the 15th. of September last. In it however there is no mention of the Algerine War. Mr. Jefferson has also wrote by the french packett, but his letter is of an old date. There has been a conference with Mr. Pitt. That gentleman...
I am very busy preparing to decamp for Virginia. Of course I shall not lay you under the trouble of reading a long letter from me this Post. There is one thing very singular in Adam’s correspondence. He is always pressing the necessity of commercial restrictions; says no treaty can be had without them, and yet he decidedly acknowledges, that in the prosecution of this commercial war there is...
I should have done myself the pleasure of writing to you sooner, but really nothing occurr’d here of sufficient consequence to communicate. Congress from the small number of States that have come forward have remained in a kind of political torpor. They have of course taken no active steps, till lately that they have addressed the States on the subject of commerce. They were not long since a...
Your letter has come safely to hand; & I should have wrote to you sooner but could not find any thing to communicate worth your acceptance: till lately Congress have been perfectly inactive: for about a fortnight past we have had a tolerably full representation; however Delawar has grown uneasy & left us, and Connecticut having prevailed on Congress to accept her cession moves off tomorrow. It...
Your kind favor has come to hand, & since that I have heard of my being again appointed in the delegation of our State. I am sorry to inform you that my health still continues in a languishing way. I am nearly in the same situation as when you left me; I hope however that the cold weather & exercise with proper medicine will produce an alteration for the better. We have little news here. There...
I am much obliged by your kind favor and am sorry I have little to communicate from this quarter worth your acceptance; We have been a caput mortuum for some time past except the little flurry that was kicked up about Philada. Carrington I presume has giv’n you full information on that point; during the contest, the Enemy wanted to raise a mutiny in our camp by proposing to go to Georgetown at...
Inclosed is a Stragling letter which has found it’s way to this place. I have recieved your favor & shall pay every attention to the case of Majr. Turner: his chance with respect to the Secretaryship is absolutely desperate; he must therefore be nominated for a Judges seat. This he has agreed to himself as appears by a letter to Mr. Carrington. Judge Symms of Jersey yesterday made an...