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    • Vanderhorst, Elias
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Vanderhorst, Elias" AND Recipient="Madison, James"
Results 1-10 of 77 sorted by editorial placement
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18 March 1801, Bristol. Transmits copy of his 17 Dec. dispatch (since which he has received no letters); encloses accounts of imports and exports by American vessels during six-month period ending 31 Dec. 1800, newspapers, and a price list of London commodities. Food costs continue to rise. Shortage is now critical, and continued war will interfere with supplies from European continent....
21 April 1801, Bristol. Has received no letters from State Department since writing his of 18 Mar. Notes that papers transmitted (which include London prices current) report two great events in northern Europe. Will not conjecture on possible consequences except to say he is not sanguine of peace but fears the contrary. Reports that provisions continue to decline in price; weather has been wet...
12 May 1801, Bristol. Wrote last on 21 Apr. , since which he has received no letters from State Department. Encloses copies of letters just received from Malta. Transmits newspapers with news from Egypt of three battles between French and British. Reports great fall in price of all grains and flour since his last letter; encloses prices current [not found]. RC and enclosures ( DNA : RG 59, CD...
10 July 1801, Bristol. Since his dispatch of 12 May, has received no letters from State Department. Encloses accounts of imports and exports by U.S. vessels in his district for first half of 1801, newspapers, and London prices current. Anticipates an abundant harvest; despite this prospect, prices are now advancing after recent fall. Owing to ill health, he must travel to Bath frequently and...
6 August 1801, Bristol. Since his last dispatch, has received no letters from JM. Reports grain harvest probably will be abundant and potato crop is promising. Consequently, grain and flour prices have declined and may go lower. Encloses newspapers, London prices current, and last year’s report on Bristol infirmary. RC ( DNA : RG 59, CD , Bristol, vol. 2). 1 p. Enclosures not found. A full...
27 August 1801, Bristol. States that weather has been fine for harvest, which promises to be abundant. In consequence, grain, flour, and potatoes continue to decline in price. Reports indicate that crops on Continent are equally good, which also influences market. Encloses newspapers and copy of prices current. RC ( DNA : RG 59, CD , Bristol, vol. 2). 1 p. Duplicate copy (ibid.) bears...
28 August 1801, Bristol. Encloses letter from Marcus Lynch, Jr., member of Lynch, Roberts, and Woodward of Cork, where he is also agent for the British East India Company, and requests JM to obtain for him the post he solicits, if vacant. Firm of Nesbitt, Stewart and Nesbitt, Lynch’s reference, ranks among the first in London. RC and enclosure ( DNA : RG 59, CD , Bristol, vol. 2). RC 1 p.;...
3 October 1801, Bristol. Transmits latest newspapers and encloses a letter from King containing word that peace preliminaries were just signed between Great Britain and France. Though terms are not yet revealed, has been informed that Great Britain will retain Cape of Good Hope and Ceylon but Egypt and Malta will be restored to their former owners. Encloses London prices current but expects...
10 October 1801, Bristol. Reports that, contrary to the information given in his last dispatch, the Cape of Good Hope will be returned to the Dutch but Cape Town will become a free port. Trinidad will be ceded to Great Britain. Encloses newspapers with other peace terms and a London price current. Also encloses a letter from Lynch on the subject Vander Horst earlier wrote to JM about; hopes...
7 November 1801, Bristol. Acknowledges receipt of JM’s 1 Aug. circular letter . The irregular practices mentioned have not occurred in any port in his jurisdiction. Has transmitted accounts of imports and exports regularly but complains of difficulty in obtaining information due to “perverseness” of American captains in refusing to show manifests, a useless gesture since, for a fee, all such...