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    • Taylor, John
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Taylor, John" AND Recipient="Madison, James"
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By Colo. Monroe an opportunity occuring, I take it to inform you, that I have not been idle since my return. Upon reflection, it seemed to me, that at the next Session of Congress, and at its very commencement, a direct, firm and resolute attack should be made upon the bank law. The news papers are improper channels through which to make a considerable impression on the public mind, because...
In coming from Philadelphia, alone, and meditative, after Congress had risen, the occurrences which had trodden on each others heels, in too rapid succession for much reflection during the session, began to pass muster in my mind, and to peice themselves together, so as to exhibit an unity of design. Connecting these with several important laws of the union, a variety of fantasies were...
I have this moment parted with Giles & Venable, who have been two days at my house; the contents of the packet I sent you by Mr: Maury were stated to them, and they request me to convey their respects, and their decided opinions to you. They think the production ought to be printed and dispersed as soon as possible. It may produce in the virga. Assembly a repeal of the bank laws, and an...
Yours of the 20th. is this instant handed to me. Had you been present, & wielding the pencil of a Hogarth, you might have depicted a lively sensation of human nature, on having the approbation it relates, announced to it. The approbation of the good, is only inferior to a consciousness of having served mankind, in the pleasurable emotions it excites. The emendation of the paper, is not only...
On the 8th. or 9th. instant T. asked leave of absence of the Senate, and expressed seriously his intention to resign. K. soon after invited T. into one of the committee rooms, and informed him, that he wished to converse with him seriously & candidly upon a very important subject. He stated that it was utterly impossible for the union to continue. That the southern and eastern people thought...
Governor Brooke is this day elected the attorney for the commonwealth in place of Mr: Innes, and several of us have turned our Eyes with much anxiety towards you as his successor. Our hopes that you will accept of the government are sanguine, in consequence of information, that you purpose to discontinue your seat in congress, after the next session. It is probable that there will be no...
Yesterday I received a letter from the southward of this state, written by a gentleman upon whom I can rely, containing the following sentence. “Mr: Henry has certainly declared for the next Assembly, in obedience to the call from General Washington, who has called on him to step forward and save his country —this is laughable; after the abuse formerly lavished upon that character, they now...
When Majr. Lindsay died, I have heard that you interested yourself on behalf of Mr: F. Taylor, as his successor. Colo. Byrd is now dead, and I take the liberty of informing you, by the request of Mr: Taylor, that he is again soliciting the naval officer’s place at Norfolk. I have heard Mr: Taylor frequently spoken of by merchants on this river, of opposed political principles, in terms of the...
15 November 1802, Caroline, Virginia. Introduces his neighbor Landon Carter of Cleve, who comes to Washington “with an invention, which, if it is as successful in practice, as it promises in theory to be, will serve still farther to exalt the American character.” “Altho’ you may have no particular acquaintance with him, his reputation must undoubtedly have reached you.” RC ( DLC ). 1 p....
26 December 1803, Port Royal, Virginia. “Inclosed is the copy of a letter addressed to the Secretary of the treasury, for reasons therein stated. My motive for writing it, is an opinion that neither yourself or Mr: Gallatin, have the most distant chance of employing a clerk, likely to be so agreeable and useful as Mr: Mc.Allister; and I felt it a duty to make one of you to avail yourself (if...