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    • Eustis, William
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Eustis, William" AND Recipient="Madison, James"
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Since the receipt of your letter you will perceive, by a copy which I took the liberty of enclosing to you, that my debut is made. That it would be assailed I was well satisfied long before it made its appearance. It was not to be expected that the wounded pigeons would not flutter. As it was not possible to consult my friends I was obliged to rely on my own judgement, and it is not without...
I cannot resist the temptation to write you. The revolution of political sentiment demonstrated in the elections for the ensuing year, the triumph of Rebublican [ sic ] principles throughout the state and even at the head quarters, must be highly acceptable to every friend of our civil institutions, and to no one more than to you. In looking round I can find no one of my political friends with...
Your letter of the 6th instant was received on my return from an excursion to New Hampshire, where I had spent some weeks with the friends of Mrs Eustis and mine, and where, among the few remaining oaks of the revolution, I had the satisfaction of meeting the venerable John Langdon, shaken with age and covered with its infirmaties, but strong in his recollection, & taking fire at the mention...
So far on our way, we renew ourselves to you and to Mrs Madison. The papers of Genl Hamilton are taken from Dr Mason and, as he informs me, placed in the hands of Mr Hopkinson of Phila. On asking the Doctor if he had received the letter from you, informing him that you had found the paper he had asked for, he said yes, & added his impression was that in case he should find among the papers of...
Since the receipt of your kind favor of the 25th January we have passed with a sameness (if such a word is tolerated) not affording much interest, one of the mildest winter seasons which we have ever experienced in this country. My health improving, has permitted exercise ad libitum on foot and on horseback. If there has been a subject of regret more dominating than any other it is that we are...
I cannot omit the occassian offered by our country man General King, who will pay his respects to you and to Mr Jefferson, on his route to Washington, to renew to you and to Mrs Madison our best respects. On our arrival at Richmond, we found a note from our friend & fellow traveller, whom we had left at Fredericksburgh, informing us that their patience having been exhausted in waiting for us...
I should be wanting in justice to those feelings of respect and friendship which your invariable kindness and friendship have inspired if I neglected any longer to acknowlege your Letter of March last borne as I presume by Mr Preston to England and transmitted to me at Brussels a short time before my leaving that city for the Hague. A long time on its route it was the more welcome as an...
The mail of this day brings your Letter enclosing that of Mr. Everett whose appointment is universally well received. There is in this case an adaptation of character which commands approbation & is peculiarly gratifying to friends. Perceiving the objections to asking a passport from the enemy it remains for us to embrace the first opportunity which affords a probability of avoiding him. The...
By the Ship "Exchange" I send you the last Brussells papers. The inauguration of the King at Brussells was marked with splendor but appeared to want the cordiality which a welcome chief might expect to receive. The Belgians, who appear to have no national character, complain 1st. that with a superior population they have only an equal vote with the Hollanders & 2ndly that they are married to...
I receive this morning, by way of London, your favor of the 12th of May. The interesting information, foreign & domestic, is in the highest degree welcome to me. In my account of the impressed seaman, I did not add, that (in consequence as I presume of the earnest tho’ indirect application on that subject) the man was discharged & the Captn. of Nightingale ordered home to account for his...