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    • Erving, George W.
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Erving, George W." AND Recipient="Madison, James"
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I received on the 7th of Novr the honor of your letter of October 27th from Richmond. The approbation which you have been pleased to give to my introduction of the system of Erro, is a compensation far exceeding any that I had expected for the labour of translating, and the still greater of so selecting from his works as to present that system in a continuous shape:– Tho’ much captivated by...
I am highly flattered by the very obliging manner in which you have condescended to receive the small articles which I took the liberty of offering to you; I wish that I could devise more adequate means of expressing my respectful & grateful feelings towards you & Mrs Madison: You still augment my obligations by your joint good wishes for my happiness, but alas! that to which Mrs Madison more...
When I took the liberty of addressing you on the 6th Oct. it was to be expected that the negotiations at Gand woud be soon terminated, & I intended to send my letter by those of the commissioners who might return home; the private letters mentioned in the last paragraph of that letter I yet retain, to be sent either by Mr Clay or Mr Gallatin, not wishing to trust them by an ordinary hand. By...
On the 23d of September I received a despatch from the secretary of State inclosing the commission to Madrid with which you have been pleased to honor me. I am extremely sensible Sir to this new proof of your confidence, & shall use every effort to render myself worthy of it. I took the liberty of submitting to you on the 11th July some speculations respecting the then state of affairs in...
Amongst the various changes produced, & to be produced in Europe, by the abdication of the emperor Napoleon, I presume that the actual transactions in Spain, & the future fate of that country, may be considered as peculiarly, & most immediately interesting, to the United States: The english papers relate most of the important occurrences, but in what is speculative, I observe that they do not...
All the papers of the legation have been delivered to Mr Crawford since the 30th July; Mr Barlows private correspondence, (amongst which are your letters to him,) as well as duplicates of his public correspondence, (he having kept a copy amongst his private papers,) remain in my possession; the reluctance with which as it seems the cartel was granted as well as other circumstances belonging to...
I had visited the principal ports of Italy, & resided two months at Naples, when (on 26 Jany) I received the distressing intelligence of Mr Barlows decease; duty to my excellent friend induced me to abandon my further plans with regard to Italy, & immediately to return hither, for the purpose of giving comfort & assistance as far as in my power to his disconsolate widow. I left Naples on the...
Soon after my arrival here (viz on the 1st. inst) I saw Mr Joy, & delivered to him the letter which you was pleased to put under my care. I find that this gentleman has done very considerable service to several cases wherein he has been employed, & has obtained the liberation of property which stood in very perilous predicaments, yet it is the general opinion amongst the americans here, by all...
I arrived here on the evening of the 8t, & yesterday received from Mr Hamilton your letter of Feby 1st; to the five letters which it inclosed the most exact attention shall be paid. If affairs in Florida have not progressed according to the reasonable views & expectations of government, this may be owing in part or principally to the encouragement which Folch has received to deviate from his...
I was in hopes that I shoud have learnt in my communications with Senr Onis, on my passage thro’ Phila something of sufficient importance to have been communicated to you; but his conversation on every point of interest, was so extremely, & even more than usually Extravagant, that I coud not presume to trouble you by any mention of it, the less necessary since (as I presumed) the then actual...