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I reached the end of my journey on Saturday Evening; without accident and in good health. I found your friends here all well. Payne arrived about an hour after I did. I inclose a letter from him, with several others. During my halt at Baltimore, I made two efforts to see Bishop Carroll, but without success. Genl. Smith had not returned to Town from his Country Seat. I could do nothing...
Your second letter my dearest, of the 26. continued on the 28. is this moment recd; and flatters my anxious wishes & hopes for your perfect recovery, and your safe return to Washington. I am glad to find you so determined in your adherence to the Drs. prescriptions. Be assured that he will give none that are not indispensable, & that you will not rejoice in having strictly observed. I had not...
The last mail brought me, my dearest yours of the 30 Ocr. I am happy to find you able to walk about. I hope that will help to restore your appetite & strength, and that it will not belong before you will be able to undertake a journey hither; tho’ anxiously as I sigh for it, I can not wish it to be precipitated agst. the fullest approbation of Dr. P. I inclose a letter from the President and...
Yours of the 1st. instant, my dearest gives me much happiness, but it can not be compleat till I have you again secure with me. Let me know the moment you can of the time you will set out that I may make arrangements for paying th⟨e⟩; Dr. &c. My Tobo. has been sold in Richd, but unfortunately th⟨e⟩; bills are not yet come on, and are on N. York at 60 days, so that some negociation will be...
I have recd. my dearest your letter by the last mail. As the Horses have been bought, the bargain must not only be maintained but Mr. Patton must understand that I am particularly indebted to him for his kindness on that as well as on other occasions. I inclose a note from Mr. Ker relating to the Cook. It implies that she was hired for a year and must be paid for accordingly. Let me know what...
I was not disappointed my dearest, in my expectation of a letter by the last mail, which continues to give me favorable reports of your returning health & strength. I hope by this time Mrs. Cutts will have joined you and that the event will accelerate that of your setting out. Proceed nevertheless with all the caution the Dr. may recommend. The inclosed letter came by yesterdays mail. I have...
I have recd. my dearest yours begun on the 15. & continued on the 16th. The low spirits which pervade it affect mine. I sho⟨uld⟩; be still more affected, if you did not tell me that your knee grew better and stronger. I am much consoled by that information, and think you ought to be also, as your knee has been the source of both our disquietudes. I hope your next will manifest better spirits,...
I mentioned in my last my dearest that I should put into the mail today the remittance promised you. Having failed to sell the bill on N. York I was obliged to enter into an arrangement with the Bank here bottomed on the Credit of that Bill. It has enabled me to forward you the enclosed post note which I hope will arrive safe, and remove all ⟨pecuni⟩;ary obstacles to your setting out. Should...
This is the last mail My dearest that will be likely to find you in Philada. and I am not without some hope that this will be too late. I take the chance however for enclosing a few letters which as they will be returned in case of your previous departure, you will receive them as soon as if they were kept here. I am desirous that you shd. get Mr Carrol, before you arrive in Baltimore. You...
§ Elbridge Gerry to Dolley Madison. 3 March 1814, “Senate Chamber.” “Mr Gerry presents his best respects to Mrs. Madison, & sends a letter this momen⟨t⟩ received from their honest friend at Lynn to herself & a letter accompanying it to himself. The latter contains a paragraph respecting small fishing boats, restrained by the embargo law so as to be useless to their needy owners; to be...
¶ John Mason to Dolley Madison. Letter not found. 8 June 1814. Described as a two-page autograph letter in Anderson Catalogue No. 995 (1913), item 162. Asks her opinion of a “plaister cast” of JM taken “from a Die, cut after the bust made by the Italian artist last year, and intended to impress medals for the Indians.”
We reached our quarters last evening at the Camp between 8 & 9 o’c. and made out very well. I have passed the forenoon among the troops, who are in high spirits and make a good appearance. The reports as to the enemy have varied every hour. The last and probably truest information is that they are not very strong, and are without cavilry [ sic ] and artillery, and of course that they are not...
Finding that our army had left Montgomery Court House, we pushed on to this place, with a view to join it, or proceed to the City, as further information might prescribe. I have just recd. a line from Col. Monroe, saying that the Enemy were out of Washington, & on the retreat to their Ships & advising our immediate return to Washington. We shall accordingly set out thither immediately. You...
and I can not yet learn what has been the result. Should the fort have been taken, the British Ships with their barges will be able to throw the City again into alarm, and you may be again compelled to retire from it, which I find would have a disagreeable effect. Should the Ships have failed in their attack, you can not return too soon. ⟨I shall⟩ keep Freeman till the question is decided, and...
The enclosed came to my hands, too late—to send over yesterday. The President being so unwell —I take the liberty to enclose it you—to hand him—so soon as he is restored to health—which I pray God may […] speedily be the case—its so warm, ⟨I am⟩ hardly able to write—the Girls all beg their respects—very respectfully & Sincerely I am your Obedt. Servt. Printed facsimile of RC (Scott J. Winslow...
James Barbour presents his respects to Mrs. Madison with a view to express his regret at the indisposition of Mr Madison and to enquire how he does. JB would have been to have visited Mr Madison but from an apprehension that company is but ill adapted to a sick man. Should Dr. Watkins be at Mr M’s if proper he would confer a favor by immediately visiting Mrs. Barbour who has been indisposed...
I snatch a moment and a very bad pen to tell you that we ended our journey in good time that is before it was dark. The roads, with a little exception, were better than was expected. We found every body well, much regretting that you could not join in the visit. It was well that I did not decline it, for there would not have been a Quorum without me, Gen’l Taylor & Mr. Breckinridge, not being...
I had made up my Mind on my return from Spain never to trouble Mr. Madison even with the mention of any disappointmt in which the Mission his partiality conferd on Me had resulted from unforeseen circumstances; I kept my resolution, untill the acceptance of my modest position here, and I should invariably have adherd to it had not an intimation from the President to the Secy of State first...
It is a source of sincere regret that I have not the pleasure of being personally acquainted, with the two Individuals, who of all on earth besides, have been, the most bounteous friends, of my dear Mother and her children, and to whose patronage we owe every advantage we enjoy: for had it not been for Mr: Madison and yourself Madam, I cannot conceive what would have been our fate, the...
We arrived about sun set: just as they were commencing their Desert. The Genl. had arrived about 3 o C. with his son & Secrety. the last so sick that he went to bed instead of Dinner. I have not heard how he is this morning. I found here only the General & his family, Col. Campbel & Wm. Roane of the Council, who will attend him till he goes out of the State, and a few of the family connection....
We had fondly hoped my dear Madam & kind & respected friend to embrace you very shortly & cultivate yet more intimately that acquaintance wch my heart wd even now urge me to call friendship. We have been forced to defer this pleasure for the present from the indisposition of my sister occasioned by the excessive heat during the week we lately passed in Philadelphia, & wch decided me to entrust...
¶ Lydia H. Sigourney to Dolley Madison. Letter not found. 26 August 1825. Offered for sale in the American Art Association, Catalogue of President Madison’s Correspondence from American Statesmen and Patriots American Art Association, Illustrated Catalogue of President Madison’s Correspondence from American Statesmen and Patriots … Collection of the Late Frederick B. McGuire (New York, 1917)....