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I told you my Dear Cosen that I should not stay very Long here after you was gone we propose Leaveing this next Wednesday for New york. Now for some News all the good Folks in this House are well only Cosen Sally is sikish, Capn Preston is gone, Sukey & Mrs Grenup are all so. Mr Grove is in the Pouts about you, tell Anny I have not seen Mr Porter so I cant tell how he Looks, the General is...
Orange Aug: 18. 94. I recd. some days ago your ⟨p⟩recious favor from Fredg. I can not express, but hope you will conceive the joy it gave me: The delay in hearing of your leaving Ha⟨n⟩over which I regarded as the only ⟨s⟩atisfactory proof of your recove⟨r⟩y, had filled me with extreme ⟨… dis⟩quietude, and the co⟨mmun⟩ication of the welcome event was ⟨e⟩ndeared to me by the stile in which it...
I will not delay a Moment my ever dear and valued friend to reply to your last interresting Epistle. Flattered as I am by your Condecension in consulting me on this important Occasion and truly and disinterestedly solicitous for your Welfare—the Task I undertake is far from being a painful one. As your friend I feel not the least Hesitation in forming my Opinion—ought I then to feel any...
3 August 1797, Philadelphia. Acknowledges letter of 23 June [not found]. “In the first place you ask me for a description of the Drawing room, I now hasten to give it you—that we have none at all—for that old what shall I call her —with her hawks eyes, gave out that the weather was too warm, and it would affect her nerves, they must be very delicate of course, but I suppose we shall have it in...
Neither the chart of your uncle, or the memory of your brother could save me from two errors on our way down, we made out, notwithstanding to reach Town before sunset. I found at Mr. Watson’s a room prepared for me, and an empty one immediately over it, but they are both in a style much inferior to what I had hoped. You must consequently lower your expectations on this subj[e]ct as much as...
Th: Jefferson was much disappointed at breakfast this morning not having till then known of the departure of mr & mrs Madison & miss Payne . he hopes they will come and dine to-day with the miss Butlers who were assured they would meet them here, and tomorrow with mrs Gallatin & mrs Mason . affectionate salutations. RC ( ICHi ). Departure of Mr & Mrs Madison & Miss Payne : the Madisons, along...
Th: Jefferson presents his affectionate salutations to mrs Madison & thinks the case she shewed him the other day (with ear-rings & a pin) will answer mrs Randolph’s views. he begs leave to remind her of the request for such a comb exactly as she sent before. he sollicits her on his own account, whenever she shall happen to be shopping, to get a garment for him to present to Virginia, another...
Th: Jefferson presents his affectionate respects to mrs Madison, & his regrets that she is not likely to return so soon to Washington as he had hoped. his regret is the greater as he knows the disappointment which his daughter will feel in not finding her here. in full expectation of mrs Madison’s earlier return she had sent through Th:J. a request to mrs Madison to have the goodness to...
There are feelings of such a nature, as no language is adequate to express, and it is only such hearts as the President, and yourself possess, that are capable of defining; and fully understanding, the grateful feelings with which mine at this moment swells; vain indeed, would be any attempt, to convey an idea of the gratitude inspired for so essential a benefit, and to that God alone, from...
Farewell my dear Sister & say good bye for me to my beloved friend Madison. He carries with him into the Presidency the most affectionate good wishes of my heart: produced by an intimate acquaintance with his public & private virtues for nine years past; & I can say with great truth that not one single act of his life during the period I speak of has excited a momentary doubt as to its...
12 March 1809, Philadelphia. Asks that his stepson be appointed an official courier to carry diplomatic dispatches to England. Requests that Mrs. Madison “have the goodness, after mentioning the Matter to the President, to inform Mrs. Lewis or me, whether the appointment has been made or not, And if it has not; in what manner an application for it should be made.” RC ( DLC : Dolley Madison...
The time of the President U.S. is so occupied by matters of so much more importance, that I did not mention to him the subject on which you did me the favor to speak to me, the purchase of a grand piano-forte, before my departure. I have again tried the instrument I mentioned to you, & accurately examined its state of repair & construction, & altho’ I still think it a very excellent one, I...
20 March 1809, Philadelphia. Encloses samples of “two kinds of lace” for use in the chariot ordered by JM. The coach will be finished by 15 May, “the Chariot about a fortnight later.” Has examined a “very handsome” English chariot made in London last July which has influenced his thinking. Mrs. Latrobe [a friend of Dolley Madison’s since childhood] is suffering from an eye inflammation, but...
I had yesterday the honor of your letter of the 20th. inst. I had already written to you on the subject of your carriages, & transmitted two patterns of English Lace, the only handsome ones which I could find in the city of that kind. When you have made your choice, it will not be necessary to send back the patterns as I shall understand which you mean, by your mentioning the broadest or...
Your very obliging & kind letter was received by Mrs. Latrobe yesterday, & I had also your commands on business which I beg leave to answer concisely today & to write more at large tomorrow. Your directions as to the liveries shall be obeyed. The patterns of colors on Glass met with an accident. They were broken & shall be sent on, repainted , tomorrow. The sketch of the Chariot in my letter...
I have sate down at a late hour my dear Mrs Madison to reply to your Letter of the 10th. in which you acknowledge the arrival of the Wig . I am releived from some anxiety concerning it, as it ought to have been with you many days sooner. Respecting the Colour of your Carriage Mr Latrobe and myself approve your choice of the red Brown . There were several shades of it among the patterns, but he...
The enclosed letters particularly the one for Mr. Dublois are upon business the most urgent please forward them as soon as convenient. I have recd. one short letter from you since we parted, not one from Lucy. Never was a poor sinner so much exhausted with an election campaign as I am; what with riding & talking I am quite sick; the second monday in March I was at M⟨or⟩gantown from thence to...
Your letter of the 19th. has just been received. Permit me in the first place to thank You for the excellent political News which concludes it. The interruption of the friendly intercourse thus restored, has cost you individually many an odd dollar extraordinary. For instance: I could not find in the whole city among the merchants a Yard of cloth fit to line your carriage, & have at last been...
I am here & expected to have been tomorrow in Washington. It is however necessary, I find that I should see Mr Finlay, who is making the Chairs & Sofas for your Drawing room in his Shop, & therefore I shall stay tomorrow & arrive in the city on Tuesday. Your Chariot is in great forwardness, & will be one of the handsomest things Philadelphia has produced. The Coachee has its last Coat of paint...
… You may, perhaps, be surprised at receiving a letter from one with whom you have had so little intercourse for the last few years. But your surprise will cease when you recollect that my Father, once your Friend, is now in exile; and that the President only can restore him to me & to his country. Ever since the choice of the people was first declared in favor of Mr Madison; my heart, amid...
I am more mortified than I can express at the conduct of the Coach-maker, I have had the misfortune to employ in your service, in furnishing to you a Carriage, which even before it has been used is discovered to be so extremely faulty. I am the more irritated and disappointed, as he has in every other instance in which I have employed or recommended him, done himself so much credit, as to have...
22 July 1809, Bristol, Pennsylvania. Thanks Mrs. Madison for gift of an “elegant representation of your present Self” which “Mr & Mrs Cadwalader who have lately seen its lovely & greatly beloved original at Washington … pronounce … to be as correct a resemblance as the painters art can pourtray.” She “wants most anxiously to embrace the dear Original; if it is not among the secrets of state,...
We reached the end of our journey yesterday at one o’clock; without interruption of any sort on the road. Mr. Coles had been here sometime, one, if not two of the expected dispatch vessels of England, had just arrived, and Mr. Gilston after a short passage from France, entered Washington about the moment I did. You may guess therefore the volumes of papers before us. I am but just dipping into...
I hope you receid., my dearest, a letter written by the last Mail. I write this in haste just to tell you that P. & myself are well; & that I am making exertions to get thro’ the necessary business, with a hope of setting out on my return tomorrow. It is very possible however that I may be detained till friday Morning. I send you all the foreign news in the inclosed papers. That from France...
Immediately after your departure I went to the President’s house in order to forward every part of the work which it was necessary to compleat before your return. I was however stopped in my intentions untill it could be ascertained whether the building fund would afford to pay for these operations. After this was ascertained, in order to strengthen the fund, I bought the two Chimney pieces...
10 June 1811, New York. Observes that it is impossible to comply with his promise to write on everything that interests him. “As you expressed some curiosity to know how the Smiths &c would treat me, I requested Payne, who told me he was about to write, to inform you that I was treated quite civilly by them all, but that their displeasure with the President and yourself was very apparent.”...
5 October 1812. Sends this letter by his cousin Edward Carrington, son of Judge Paul Carrington. “You will find Mr. Carrington an amiable and intelligent young gentleman; full of indignation at the wrongs and insults under which his Country suffers, and animated with an ardent zeal to avenge them by his personal efforts in the field; he attempted to raise a Volunteer Company, but having failed...
12 November 1812. Sends “nine other copies of the Engraving of the portrait of the President, to whom and to the family I pray you to present my respects.” “I took the liberty of writing to him by the mary amore , and of sending him some brochures . I hope soon to hear of his reelection, and of complete success to his patriotic administration.” Sends “this by Dr morell, who is a Very promising...
I am again at Clarksburg after an absence of two months, worse than mispent in the western Country. I have not even the consolation to believe that any benefit has resulted to the community from my expedition, & therefore there is no offset for ⟨m⟩y in⟨di⟩vidual sacrifices of time & money. I left General Harrison at Franklinton about the 1st. instant & the Virginia troops at Delaware four or...
20 March 1813, Bordeaux. Promises to “send the President a good stock of wine, Brandy and liqueurs” by Ruth Barlow when she returns to the United States. “You will hear perhaps through the President and Mr Monroe of the ground I took while at Paris concerning the affairs of the Legation.… As there is a Secretary of Legation and a private Secretary to the late minister my desire was to preserve...