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Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] June 4, 1777. Discusses the qualifications of Lutterloh. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Lovell was a delegate from Massachusetts to the Continental Congress. Major Henry Emanuel Lutterloh who was employed in the quartermaster’s department.
I have your favr of the 30th May inclosing [a] List of the French Officers who came over in the Amphitrite, with the Ranks which they are to bear. I have stated to Congress some difficulties that will arise upon granting them Rank from the Dates of their french Commissions. They will by these means supersede all our own Officers of equal Rank whose Commissions, upon the new establishmt of the...
Your very polite favour was handed me this Evening. I esteem myself much obliged for the enclosed plan, but I cannot describe to you the distress and agitation which the reception of your Letter threw me into. It was some time before I could get resolution to open it, and when I had opend it I dared not read it. Ten thousand horrid Ideas rushd upon my Soul. I thought it would announce to me...
ALS : Massachusetts Historical Society I receiv’d your Favour (without Date) communicating a Method of Secret Writing, for which I am oblig’d to you. I have since receiv’d yours of July 4. I was very sensible before I left America, of the Inconveniencies attending the Employment of Foreign Officers, and therefore immediately on my Arrival here I gave all the Discouragement in my Power to their...
Your kind Favours of 14 and 18 Novr. I received together, this Evening. I thank you, for your obliging Remembrance of me, and for your entertaining Anecdotes. Is there not Ground of Suspicion, that the Standards, Trophys, and other things, are concealed among, the Officers Baggage? But by the Convention Burgoignes Honour is to be relyed on, that nothing improper Shall be So concealed. A broken...
Your Letters arrived in the absence of Mr. Adams who is gone as far as Portsmouth, little thinking of your plot against him. O Sir you who are possessd of Sensibility, and a tender Heart, how could you contrive to rob me of all my happiness? I can forgive Mr. Geary because he is a Stranger to domestick felicity and knows no tenderer attachment than that which he feel s for his Country, tho I...
LS and copy: National Archives; AL (draft) and copy: Library of Congress; copy: Yale University Library I see in a Vote of Congress shown me by Capt. Franval, that Mr. Deane is disown’d in some of his Agreements with Officers. I, who am upon the Spot, and know the infinite Difficulty of resisting the powerful Solicitations here of Great Men, who if disobliged might have it in their Power to...
I cannot omit this opportunity of acknowledging the Receipt of your kind Favours of 27 or 28 Novr. I Say one or the other of those days, because although the Letter has no date yet it Says it was written on the Day when a certain Commission was voted me, and both the Commissions are dated the 27, altho the Copy of the Resolution of Congress by which I was appointed is dated the 28. I should...
In consequence of your Letter of the 31. of last month, I dispatched a Gentleman well acquainted with the ground and Inhabitants in the vicinity where the Journals of Congress were said to be deposited, in order to make inquiry concerning them—he found them, without difficulty—and they will be sent forward to York under the Escort of Colonel Hartleys Regiment—The Search for the Types was not...
I have received, this Morning, by several Hands and at other Times during the last Week, Several of your Favours. I will endeavour to acknowledge each if I can but if I should mistake in my Hurry and omit, one or two I hope you will excuse it. One of Jany 1. one of Jany. 17. one of Jany 21. one of Jany. 20. with their Enclosures. I will, do all I can to ensure a Passage for the Resolution of...
I am greatly allarmed and distressd at the intelligence from Bordeaux, with regard to Dr. Franklin, which if true must be attended with very serious consequences. I had just acquired fortitude sufficent to withstand the dangers of the Sea and open and avowed Enemies, but was not prepaird for the assassinateing knife of a Ravellick. —Is there no method that congress can take to chain these...
I have been favd with yours of the 24th and 26th instants. The latter by Mr de Francy, who delivered me the several things mentioned in Mr Penets letter. You have my thanks for you care in forwarding them. Several accounts corroborate the probability of the evacuation of Rhode Island, and a number of Men are embarked at New York. I have not the least doubt but they are meant to reinforce Genl...
Will you forgive my so often troubling you with my fears and anxieties; Groundless as some of them have been they were real to me for a time, and had all the force of truth upon me. I most sincerely wish my present uneasiness may arise from as fi c ticious a cause as the former proved to be but from many circumstances I fear it will not. Tis near four months since the Boston saild, in all...
I know not whether I ought to reply to your favour of April the first, for inded Sir I begin to look upon you as a very dangerous Man. It was a Saying of a very corrupt Statesman that every Man had his price, had Sir Robert Walpole impeachd mankind with a universal Love of Flattery I believe his assertion would have been more agreable to Truth, but I suppose he was judgeing others by his own...
As I have so often troubled you with my fears tis a debt I owe your patience to communicate to you my happiness. To a Heart so susceptible as the person I address I need not discribe the joy I experienced this day in receiving Letters from my dear absent Friend informing me of his Safety and Health. He arrived at Beaudeaux the begining of April and reachd Paris the 8th, but I know not what...
Passy, 9 July 1778. printed: JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:148–149 . Adams announced the arrival of dispatches from the congress, including the ratified Franco-American treaties and letters from Lovell. He commented on the outbreak of hostilities between Britain and France and the relative...
LS : National Archives, American Philosophical Society; copy and transcript: National Archives; copy: Harvard University Library I received your Favour of May 15. and was glad to find that mine of Decr. 21. had come to hand. Mr. Deanes Brother writes that it was not signed, which was an accidental Omission. Mr. Deane himself is I hope with you long before this time, and I doubt not but every...
Your favours of May 16 and 25 by Captain Barnes reached me Yesterday. These with those by Niles from Connecticut and those by the Saratoga from Baltimore are all that I have received from you or from any Body at Congress, which gives me Pain, because your other Letters must have miscarried, and I hold your Letters in so high Esteem that I cannot be willing to loose one. The Robbery of Folgiers...
This Moment your favour of August the 6 is come to hand. My Heart reproaches me that I have not before this time told you that according to the Scotch Song “I had banishd all my Grief for I was sure the News was true and I was sure he’s well.”—Indeed Sir I have been so much absorbed in my own happiness and so selfish that I have scarcly thought of communicating it. But a debt of gratitude is...
The day before Yesterday, I received yours of June 8. We had before received the Resolve of May 5, and the 11th and 12 Articles are agreed to be expunged altho the formalities are not yet passed. There is no Mystery in the Fier Roderique, I believe. It is certain that the Commissioners here, had no Concern with her. The Affair of the Company of Roderique, is in a good Way of Negociation I...
It is now a Year, Since I left you, and I have heard very Seldom from you, since that Time. I have written as often as I could, but so many Vessells have been taken that I fear you have heard as seldom from me. There is no News, any where excepting the innumerable Reports circulated in every Part of Europe, by the Emmissaries of England, every one of which I know to be false: they still...
Yours of 12 Oct. We have received, by which We learn that foreign affairs were under Consideration. Mr. D. had wrote on 14 Sept. that they were then under Consideration. From the Time taken We have reason to Expect they will be well digested. There are great Expectations here among the interested. Mr. D and others have written in a manner which makes it expected that one will be left alone...
It is unhappy that So many People in America, should perswade themselves that the Ennemy intend to evacuate New York and Rhode Island. This opinion cannot fail to damp their Ardour, and Slacken their Nerves. But you may depend upon it, they mean no such Thing. On the Contrary it is their unalterable Resolution, to maintain the Possession of both, as long as they can. Indeed either without the...
It gives me real pain to see the various arts and machinations of our internal Enemies practised with Effect upon the generality of Mankind. From the various reports which have been too successfully circulated for this month past the people will be brought to entertain suspicions with regard to congress which will tend to weaken their Authority and be greatly detrimental to our cause. Mr. D ea...
I Suffer So much Uneasiness, on Account of the State of Things here, that I cannot fail to communicate my Anxieties, so to some one in Congress, which you may We are very much Straightened for Funds, and you send Us no supplies, and yet you draw upon Us, from America from the West Indies, and from many other Quarters. We are continually exposed to the Insolen Reproaches, and the Insolence of...
May I be permitted to call of your attention from the important and weighty concerns of State to answer me a Question in which I feel myself interested. I find by some late intelligence which I have collected that there is a New arrangement of the commissioners, Doctor Franklin being appointed Minister plenipotentiary for France, Mr. Lee for Spain. My query is where is my Friend to be placed?...
Your favour of Jan’ry 19 never reachd me till the 26 of this Month. The only reason why I did not mention the recept of your Letter November 27 and acknowledge with thanks Mr. L ovel l ’s kind care and attention to the Box which arrived safe was oweing to my not receiving the least intimation of it, till after my Letter was sent to the post office. In reply to a certain congratulation, can...
Yours of the 24 Oct. is before me. I have received several Letters from you every one of which I have answered, and written you many more. But so many Vessells have been taken, that I fear many have miscarried. We have been totally in the dark about every Thing at Philadelphia, for a very long Space of Time, yet private Persons learnt all—untill the Address of Mr. Deane to the People, a...
I set down Simply to acknowledge over again the Receipt 1777 Decr I 8 21 1778 Jany. 20. Ap. 29. May 15. 16 Sept 25 3 others which accompanied some of the others without dates Oct. 24 of the Letters from you whose dates are in the Margin. These have been answerd, and I have wrote you at other Times. But there is a terrible Waste of Letters in the Sea. I cannot lay aside my Pen without Saying,...
I inclose you an English paper of May 15th whereby you will see the Temper of the English Councils & the Failure of the prince Nassau’s Expedition to Jersey & Guernsey. however, as the Troops that were designed for America, under Convoy of Admiral Arbuthnot (being 4000) went to Guernsey, it is probable they will be detained some time & possibly it will prevent their going out at all, as it is...