You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Livingston, Robert R.

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 11

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Livingston, Robert R."
Results 1-30 of 246 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I have not hesitated to send you one of the inclosed because I know that your mind will view in it nothing but the abstract question of right; and in the opinion of my fellow citizens on that question it will be my duty to acquiesce. I owe it to you also in return for your excellent book on the subject of sheep, now becoming daily more and more interesting to us. I am embarked a little in that...
It has been my wish to find some specimen of manufacture within my domestic precincts worthy of being presented to your daughter Mrs. Livingston. Delay has not relieved me from the mortification of betraying the poverty of our resources, by resorting to Mrs. M’s Smokehouse; from which are forwarded a few Virginia Hams, in a The Box contains 2 dozen, & Mr. G. is requested to forward it to...
Your favor of the 25th Oct. afforded me much pleasure by the information it gave of the success with which you prosecuted your plan of enlightening your countrymen on the subject of sheep & wool, and of aiding them in the manner of increasing & improving both. I sincerely wish your example may be duly felt in all the states adapted to those objects, and I believe this is the case with all that...
Altho’ I have been very tardy in acknowledging your favors of Jany. 17 & 24th. and the very valuable present from Mrs. E. Livingston, I am not the less sensible of them. I pray you to tender her in my behalf, my sincerest thanks for such a token of her kindness. The cloth has been highly admired both for the manufacture, of which she has the merit, and for the material which affords a specimen...
I recd. from the hand of Col. Livingston your favor of Novr. 23. His return having been unexpectedly sudden, I could not conveniently then acknowledge it, and in the hope that I might be enabled by procrastination to communicate some thing or other sufficiently interesting on our public affairs, I have arrived at a very late date, and without the advantage of making any amends for it. We have...
I have duly recd yours of the 8th. and will pay to it the attention you wish. We expect an opportunity for Genl. Armstrong about the 10th. Feby. The Vessel will sail from N. York. I mention the circumstance as this may convey the information sooner than the newspapers which are to publish it, and as you may be willing to avail yourself of the opportunity for later communications. The Embargo...
Your favor of Dec. 20. has been recieved. the copy of the late volume of agricultural proceedings is not yet at hand, but will probably come safe. I had formerly recieved the preceding volumes from your kindness, as you supposed. writings on this subject are peculiarly pleasing to me, for, as they tell us, we all sprung from the earth, so to that we naturally return. it is now among my most...
I lost no time, after the receipt of your letter requesting a passport for Col. Livingston, in forwarding that document to Mr. Juhel ; and found it very convenient to add to it duplicates of letters for Genl. Armstrong & Mr. Bowdoin, the original of which had just been dispatched by another conveyance. Your preceding letter was recd. also in due time. I thought it most proper not to answer it...
I have been favored with yours of the 25th of Feby. in answer to mine on the subject of the papers in your hands relating to the Ship business of the Legation of the United States at Paris. As it is a task which you can best perform, I request the favor of you to select the papers which may be most properly returned to Paris, and send them to Mr. Gelston to be forwarded to Genl. Armstrong: and...
The two reciepts of Pougens have come safely to hand. the account had been settled without difficulty. The federal papers appear desirous of making mischief between us & England by putting speeches into my mouth which I never uttered. percieving by a letter recieved in January that our Comrs. were making up their mind to sign a treaty which contained no provision against impressment, we...
Having written to you some time past, that the papers respecting the claim of William Lewis were not in the possession of the Legation at Paris, you were good enough to promise that you would review your papers, in order to separate such as related to unfinished business of individuals, which it was your intention to forward to Genl. Armstrong. An application lately made respecting Lewis’ case...
Your favor of the 24 Ult: has lain longer by me without an acknowledgt. than I intended. One cause of the delay was an omission to address myself to the Auditor instead of the Sey. of the Treasy. and his taking some little time in the crowd of business, to prepare the inclosed note on the subject of your accts. which contains all the information I can now give. I have myself recd frequent...
The case of Mr William Lewis, whose vessel was carried into Tobago by a French Cruizer, as stated and referred to in the letter I had the honor to write to you on the 27th Octr 1803, has been since renewed to Genl Armstrong, who returns for answer, that he has neither seen nor heard any thing of it, that none of your papers have been left with him, and that Mr. Skipwith’s memory does not...
Your favor of the 29 Ulto. was duly handed to me by Mr. Townsend. I congratulate Mrs. Livingston & yourself on your safe arrival, and the shortness of the passage. Your trip up the river was but a reasonable preliminary to your Visit to Washington, and was advised also by the approaching departure of the President, which will take place in 8 ⟨or⟩; 10 days. Mine will be a few days before or...
In my letter of the 7th. February I intimated that if your desire of returning to the United States required it, the letter of leave with which you were provided, though calculated for another event, might be made subservient to this purpose, and the expectation that you would charge a trust worthy person with our affairs as is usual on such occasions. Genl. John Armstrong of New York, being...
I have undertaken to forward the inclosed letter addressed to the First Consul of France, at the instance of the writer, whose letter to me manifests his compliance with the terms on which it was permitted to be inclosed under cover of this Department. I am entirely unacquainted with the individual, and do not wish it to pass to the hands of the First Consul in a manner implying the act of...
You were probably acquainted in this Country with Colonel Toussard who will have the honor of delivering you this letter. He has filled several stations in our Military service at different periods and always with much credit to himself and advantage to the service. During our revolutionary war he lost an arm in an action in which he displayed much zeal and bravery, and to my knowlege was...
Since the occupation of New Orleans by the United States, some occurrences have taken place, which their trivial nature would have consigned to oblivian had they not been magnified by the peculiar temper with which they have been viewed by Mr. Laussat. As this gentleman will no doubt communicate them to the French government, it seems proper that by your being given a short sketch of what has...
Since my acknowledgment of yours of Octr. 20. & 31. I have received those of 2, 15 & 23d. November and 11th. December. In mine of January 31. I informed you that Louisiana had been Transferred by the French Commissioner to our Commissioners on the 20th. of December, that nothing had officially passed on the occasion concerning the boundaries of the ceded Territory; but that Mr Laussat had...
I have the honor to inclose a copy of the memorial of Jeremiah Lawrence and others, complaining of the capture by the French of three vessels belonging to them. It appears that they were engaged in Whaling on the coast of St Domingo, and that tho’ they had nothing on board but the necessary stores and the proceeds of their industry in the voyage, they were seized in a place called Sam Bay at...
In my letter of the 31st of January expressive of the wishes of the President in relation to such modifications of the late Convention with France as might impart its benefits more equally and—justly among the claimants, it was omitted to suggest an arrangement for the immediate relief of such of them as are in that Country and might suffer from the disappointment and delay consequent upon the...
Mr Fitzsimons of Philadelphia, on behalf of those interested in the ship New Jersey has requested me to recommend their case to your attention. This vessel was condemned in the course of the late war by an Agent of France residing at the City of St Domingo and it is the expectation of the applicants by obtaining a revocation of the condemnation to qualify their claim for adjustment by the...
The person to whom I committed my despatches of the 31st ult having been detained here till this time, I avail myself of the opportunity of acknowledging the receipt of your two letters of October 20 & 31 which have just come to hand. I have laid them before the President, but his engagements at the present moment have permitted as yet but a very slight attention to their contents. I can...
The public letters which you will receive by this conveyance acknowledge all the letters recd. from you since the date of those last written to you, except your correspondence with Mr. Monroe. This I have thought proper to acknowledge in a private letter because I have not placed it on the files of the Office. You left me free to consider the Letters which passed between you as private, and I...
The two last letters received from you bear date on the —— and 30th September, so that we have been now four months without hearing from you. The last from me to you was dated on the 16. day of January, giving you information of the transfer of Louisiana on the 20th of December by the French Commissioner Mr Laussat to Governor Claiborne and Genl Wilkinson the Commissioners appointed on the...
I dropt you lately a few lines on the subject of Jerome Bonaparte’s expected marriage to a young lady of Baltimore. The affair was afterwards apparently broken off, but has since been compleated; and that letter has been forwarded. In order to ensure your receipt of the substance of it (no copy having been kept of the original) it is wished by the friends of Mr. Patterson the father of the...
Mr Stephen Girard, a respectable Merchant of Philadelphia, intending to send his Agent, Mr Robert Peter Branu, to Paris in order to solicit payment for some claims he has upon the French Government, has requested that the circumstance might be mentioned to you, with a view to bespeak your aid and countenance to him, as far as it may be requisite and compatible with usage and the nature of the...
The Bearer Mr. Isaac Coles is about to visit England, and will probably see Paris before he comes back to this Country. He is a young gentleman who is represented to me from the best quarters as equally estimable for his talents & his dispositions, and has the better claim on my attentions, as his family is nearly related to that of Mrs. Madison. Permit me to make him known to you & to ask for...
In my letter of the 22d ult, I mentioned to you that the exchange of the ratifications of the Treaty and Conventions with France had taken place here, unclogged with any condition or reserve. Congress have since passed an act to enable the President to take possession of the ceded territory and to establish a temporary Government therein. Other Acts have been passed for complying with the...
My letter of the 4th. with a P.S. of the 8th. being delivered to the Captain of the vessel, the object of the present is to inform you that the reports of both those days prove to be unfounded, and that it is questionable whether the marriage spoken of is to take place. you will therefore depend on future evidence as to the fact, & only use the apology if the issue should render it necessary....