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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Lincoln, Benjamin"
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Your letter of the 28th Instt noticeing Me the forwardness of the Troops under your Command was this day handed Me by Majr Turner, on Receipt of this you’ll please to Halt your Men till a Conference with General Clinton who waits on to advise with You, and determine on a Secret Expedition to Long-Island—which if properly conducted I have no doubt will be attended with Success and be...
As I am credibly inform’d that the inhabitants along the Sound carry on a frequent communication with the Enemy on Long Island, you are hereby instructed to collect all the boats, & other small craft on the sound, from Horse Neck downwards to any extent you shall think proper, & convey them to any place you shall concieve to be most convenient. Givn under my hand at Head Quarters this 7th...
By a Letter which I had this day the pleasure of receiving from the president of the Council of Massachusets Bay, I find that that State had immediately upon my Application ordered a Reinforcement of about 6000 Militia to the Continental Army, and that they had appointed you to the command. Give me leave Sir to assure you that this Appointment gives me the highest Satisfaction as the proofs...
I am glad to hear by yours of the 4th Inst. that you had arrived at Peekskill, and I hope from the measures you have taken to hasten up your Troops that they will soon be all with you. General Heath will communicate mine of this date to you, by which you will find that the greatest part of your Troops are to move down towards New York to draw the Attention of the Enemy to that Quarter, and if...
An Inconvenience of considerable Magnitude arising from the Practice of carrying Household furniture &C. in Waggons & Carts to the Enemy has determined me to direct that in future nothing shall be transported that way—I do not mean to prevent such of the Inhabitants as choose to withdraw within the Enemy’s lines from taking with them all their Apparel & Household furniture as usual if they can...
Inclosed you have Copy of a Letter which I have this Moment received from Mr Boudinot. You will please to send a Copy of it to General Putnam ⅌ Express. Genl Green suspects that the Woman mentioned in the inclosed Letter is the same that applied to you for a pass to come up to Basken Ridge to look for her Son. You will therefore keep a strict watch for her, or upon any other Woman that applies...
I have wrote to General Herd to march the Militia assembled under his Command to this place —I am about making a new disposition of the Forces and shall give General Herd the necessary Orders upon his arrival here—You will send the 8th Pennsylvania Battalion commanded by Col: Broadhead to occupy the Posts General Herd leaves —You will please to give the Col: all the assistance in your power in...
I have yours with the Return of your Division. I observe that the Return of the two independent Companies is much smaller than the last and the deficiency not accounted for. I therefore desire the Captains may be called upon to know what is become of their Men. I also observe that there are eight Men of the Corps under Chambers absent on furlough, I desire that they may be ordered in as well...
I am well convincd that the amazing desertions which have of late prevail’d among our Troops, proceeds intirely from their not being regularly paid; For it is not to be supposed, that the bare encouragement of recieving a few Dollars from the Enemy for their Arms could operate so forcibly upon them. I have in vain endeavour’d to make the officers bring in their Pay Rolls and draw their money,...
Letter not found: to Maj. Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, 21 May 1777. Lincoln wrote GW on 24 May : “I was honoured with your Excellences favor of the 21.”
From the uncommon prevalency of desertion at this time in the army, I am induced to think, there must be great mismanagement and abuses among the officers, which must be corrected as the first and principal step towards preventing it. This general consideration makes it necessary that a careful inquiry should be made into the matter, and as the practice exists in a higher degree in the 8th...
Major Campbell advises by Letter just now received that the Enemy are advancing toward Van Vacter’s Bridge. I wish you to send out fresh scouts immediately, and to make the earliest reports. If this report is confirmed by your scouts you will order your Tents to be struck, and put into the Waggons, and have everything in readiness to move. I am Sir yr mt hume servt LS , addressed to Wayne, in...
I have just received information that the Fleet left the Hook yesterday, and as I think Delaware the most probable place of their destination, I shall immediately move the Army that way. I desire that you will agreable to what I hinted to you, set off immediately, and proceed as quickly as your Health will permit to join the Northern Army under the Command of Genl Schuyler. My Principal view...
It gives me great pleasure to find by yours of the 20th that you are likely to save your leg, and that you think you will be able to take the Feild in the Spring, should there be occasion. I congratulate you upon the glorious termination of the Campaign against Genl Burgoine, which I hope will, in its consequences, free us from all our oppressors. Ever since the Enemy got possession of...
By the inclosed Copies of Two Resolutions of Congress you will perceive that they have restored Genl Arnold to the rank he claims in the line of General Officers, and have directed me to grant him a Commission for that purpose. This I have done, and he will receive it by the conveyance by which this goes. From your peculiar situation, and being one of the Officers within the operation of the...
On the 20th Ulto I did myself the pleasure of writing you by Colonel Marshall who was going to Boston, to which place I had heard that you were gone. Lest my information on that head should have been wrong and you should still be at Albany, I transmit you a Copy of my Letter of that date by the conveyance which now offers, and I am to request that you will, as soon as your condition will...
A Gentleman of France having, obligingly, sent me three setts of Epaulets & Sword knotts, two of them professedly to be disposed of to any friend, I should choose I take the liberty of presenting them to you, and Genl Arnold, as a testimony of my sincere regard, and approbation of your conduct. Nothing would give me more pleasure than to hear of your perfect recovery, as I am with the most...
I wish you and General McDougal to whom I have written upon the subject, to send a Fatigue party from your Divisions on the Road from Fredericksburg by New Milford—Woodberry and Waterbury to Farmington to repair it. This will facilitate our movement, if we proceed to the Eastward. Genl McDougal will only furnish for the fatigue from Nixon’s brigade, as I may find it necessary to make a...
You will perceive by the inclosed Copy of a Resolution which came to hand last night, that Congress have determined on measures for securing Charles Town, in case the Enemy should form an expedition against it, and have appointed you to command there. I have nothing to add upon the subject, except my assurances, that you will have, as you have had upon all occasions, my warmest wishes for your...
I am sorry I happened to miss you yesterday. I waited till two Oclock p.m. in expectation of your arrival, and then divided my family upon difft roads—but all of us escaped your Tract. conceiving that this might happen, I left a few introductory Letters (for you to some of the first Gentlemen in Carolina) with Baron Kalb, and would now inclose you others to my friends in Virga if I knew what...
Congress having directed me to order an Engineer for the service of the Southern Department —Lt Colonel L’Aumoy is in consequence of General Du portails recommendation detached on that duty—he is instructed to proceed with all possible expedition to South Carolina, there to take your orders—and his Conduct while he has been attached to this Army, leaves me no room to doubt that he will give...
I have had the pleasure of receiving your favors of the 19th Decemr and 5th January. I thank you for your communications and shall always be happy to hear from you when you have leisure. I am so utter a stranger to the Country in which you are, that I cannot pretend to offer my opinion upon the measures that ought or ought not to be pursued. Of this however I am confident, that your Abilities...
West Point, July 30, 1779. Regrets that Lieutenant Colonel John Laurens was wounded. Discusses lack of men. Regrets not being able to send troops to the South. Sends news of Stony Point, the arrival of Charles, Earl Cornwallis, and rumors from the South. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Some days since Major Rice delivered me your letter of the 5th of June last—I am sorry to hear that Col. Laurens received a wound so soon after his arrival with you; as it prevented his following the dictates of his zeal and rendering the service for which he is qualified, at a moment very interesting to his Country and to his own feelings. But I am happy to hear it was slight & that it will...
West Point, September 28, 1779. Congratulates Lincoln on Stono Ferry attack. Regrets delay in securing reinforcements from Virginia. Believes British objectives to be Georgia and South Carolina. Sends news of the French fleet. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I received your letter of the 8th of July with that pleasure which we always experience in hearing from those for whom we have a real esteem—The details you give me of your attack upon Stono ferry are obliging and satisfactory; and “though all was not done which you wished” I have no doubt that the attempt had a good effect and at least accelerated the retreat of the Enemy—It did no discredit...
Lieutenant Colo. Ternant who will have the honor of delivering you this returns to the Southward to execute the duties of his Office of Inspector to the Troops in South Carolina and Georgia. He is furnished with the “Regulations for the order and discipline of the Troops of the United States” approved by Congress on the 29th March and by them directed to be generally observed. He is also...
I had the pleasure of receiving yours of the 22d October by Colo. Laurens, to whose information, I am indebted for a very particular account of the situation of affairs to the southward. I had, previous to his arrival, been furnished by Congress with Copies of your dispatches by Major Clarkson, who came forward himself to Head Quarters. By him, I had the mortification of hearing of the ill...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] February 27, 1780 . Is pleased with Lincoln’s present situation. Hopes that the Spanish success in Florida will turn the British attempts in that direction. Instructs Lincoln to cooperate with Juan de Miralles. Reports that Virginia troops are being sent to the South. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have been successively favored with your letters of the 7th of Novr 23d of Decemr and 8th of January last I am extremely happy to find both for the public and you⟨r⟩ sake that your prospects were less gloomy when you wrote the two last than when you wrote the first. I hope you have had the time necessary to complete your defences on the land side, and will be able effectually to baffle every...
This will be delivered to you by Brigadier General Du Portail, Chief Engineer; a Gentleman of whose abilities and merit I have the highest opinion and who, if he arrives in time will be of essential utility to you. The delay that will probably attend General Clinton’s operations in consequence of the losses he has suffered on the voyage, makes me hope—his assistance will not come too late; and...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 30, 1780 . Introduces and recommends Brigadier General Du Portail. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] April 15, 1780 . Approves of plans for expedition against St. Augustine. Discusses situation in the South. Instructs Lincoln to “determine places of deposit” for provisions and forage in North and South Carolina. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have successively received your several letters of the 23d and 28th of January 12th 14th and 23d of February, almost all of which were come to hand when I wrote you by General Du Portail, but by accident were not acknowleged. As far as it is possible for me at this Distance, and with a very inconsiderable knowlege of the Country, to judge, your reasonings on the best plan for an expedition...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] April 18, 1780 . Asks Lincoln to employ Lieutenant Colonel Dubuysson “in such a manner as will enable him to indulge his ardor.” Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Lieutenant Colonel Charles François Dubuysson des Aix des Hays .
Morristown [ New Jersey ] April 28, 1780 . Fears that loss of the “Bar” may mean loss of Charleston. Sends news of enemy’s movements and of the march of the Maryland Division. Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Since my last of the 15th Instant, I am favoured with Your two Letters of the 4th and 24th of March. The advices You give me greatly increase my anxiety for the fate of Charles Town and the State of South Carolina; and You will believe that my solicitude is not unmixed with considerations of personal friendship. The loss of the bar is a very serious loss—I hope it may not be a fatal one. This...
I have duly received your favor of the 9th of last Month, containing an account of the Enemy’s movements till that period. Since the receipt of this I have seen a Copy of a Letter from the Honble Mr Gervais, one of the Council, as low down as the 15th—and was happy to find by it that their Batteries, though they had been opened some days, had done You but very little damage; and I was made...
I transmit you the inclosed letter from Sir Henry Clinton in answer to your’s of the 5th Instant. I am exceedingly sorry to find that he seems to involve your Exchange with that of the Southern Army & to make it depend upon it. At this time, for the reasons I mentioned to you, & others which will readily occur, an Exchange of privates could not possibly be gone into with the least degree of...
By a Letter I have received from Sir Henry Clinton of the 4th Inst., I find that the interview which has been proposed between You & General Phillips is to take place on the 19th of the Month, at Elizabeth Town. I presume Sir Henry Clinton informs You of this by the Letter I now transmit; and I need not add, that it will give me the highest pleasure if You can effect your exchange either for...
I have now the pleasure to congratulate you upon your exchange. The certificate of it will be transmitted to you by the Commissary of Prisoners—Majr Bailey and Jackson are also exchanged. I do not mean by this notice to hasten your return to the Army, for that alas! is upon the eve of its annual dissolution & consequently of the Enemys advantages—I am of opinion that your influence, and...
I have received your favors of the 25th & 28th of last month, and it gives me very great pleasure to find that you are appointed to a Committee the subject of whose deliberations you are so well acquainted with—and it adds not a little to my satisfaction to hear, that it is generally composed of Gentlemen remarkable for their good sense & patriotism, at a time when there never was greater...
I have had the pleasure of receiving your favor of the 25th of December. If prejudices will still prevail against experience, the fatal effects of temporary inlistments must be endured to the risque, if not the ruin, of the cause. The discontents and jealousies arising from this source have at length broke out in the Pennsylvania Line as you will have been informed by General Knox before this...
I have been duly favored with your Letters of the 7th 17th & 25th of Janry. The distractions in one part of the Army, and distresses in the other, have engaged me so far as to prevent my acknowledging them until the present time. In addition to the perplexities occasioned in the first instance, by the revolt of the Pennsylvania Line—the subsequent arrangements for quelling the Insurgents, if...
I have lately been obliged to make so large a temporary detachment, that it becomes indispensibly necessary to call in the Recruits from the States nearest at hand. You will therefore be pleased to dispatch orders to the superintending Officers to send forward, to the Army, such as may have come in to the places of rendezvous, and to exert themselves to collect and send in any which may yet be...
I have received your favor of the 15th. I am glad to hear of Colonel Laurens’s departure—He wrote to me a few days before he sailed and mentioned in the warmest manner your exertions to get the Ship mann’d—The few Continental soldiers you spared on the occasion were well bestowed considering the importance of Colonel Laurens’s mission. By a Resolve of Congress of the 4th of January, the Board...
Every day convinces me that the Enemy are determined to bend their force against the southern States, and that we must support them powerfully from this Quarter, or they will be lost. Except such support is given in time, it will be ineffectual—The enemy will not only have established themselves in posts, but in the affections of many of the people. The pennsylvania Line is already ordered to...
I have recd your favors of the 2d and 13th Inst. Major Clarkson has communicated the Matter for which I am referred to him in your last. It seems a clue which may lead to an ample discovery of what has been some time suspected, provided the Emissary is sincere. But Major Clarkson cannot tell me whether he proposed to make himself known to me or whether he is to communicate his discoveries to...
I have received your favors of the 26th of April and of the 3d inst. I am pleased to hear so flattering accounts of the prospects of Men and of some kinds of supplies, but so great are my apprehensions on the score of provisions, that I am sending General Heath purposely to the Eastern States to represent our distresses and to endeavour to fix a plan for our regular supply in future. I refer...
I did myself the Pleasure to write you under the 11th May ulto—which went on by the Hand of Maj’r Genl Heath, who was instructed with a particular Commission to the Eastern States—In that Letter I mentioned your comg on to join the Army. Least the above Letter should by any Means have misscarried, I take this Opportunity to mention my Wishes to you again—& to request you will be pleased to...