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I have received and read with pleasure, and with gratitude the Circular letter, and the Memorial to Congress, which you did me the honor to transmit, to me—I have the honor agree with the City of Philadelphia and their Committee in their Sentiments concerning the great question before Congress, relative to the toleration of Slavery in the state of Missouri—The only question that can arise in...
On considering the plan of your house, I find it will make considerable odds to me that in the room over the kitchen, the door be placed in a corner of the room; I presume it must be in the left hand corner as you enter, or the Northeast corner of the room. Perhaps it may be better to leave this door in it’s present state, whatever that be, and also the cornice &c. in that end of the room (the...
I shipped to a person in London, some time before the war, 4 hhds. of my Albemarle tobacco. No account of sales was ever rendered, and being now in settlement with the representative of that person, we are obliged to find out the worth of that tobacco as we can. Mr. Charles Carrol (who lodges at Mrs. House’s) is to settle the price with me. As I can only procure circuitous evidence, I shall...
Capt. Stratton arrived last night with the 4. hhds. of tobo. for which I gave you the bill of lading some time ago. He will call on you to-day. I should like that it were examined, because I believe, from the marks, that it is of the Bedford tobo.—I mentioned to you sometime ago that I believed I should have occasion for about 400. Dollars of this money, to be obtained by discount at the bank....
The day I left Philadelphia, I went for the first time up into the book-room which Mr. Carstairs is building, and then for the first time also observed he had left no place for the chimney. On asking an explanation I found that some how or other he had taken a notion from the beginning that there was to be none. I am sure he had it not from me. It is possible that I may not have particularly...
I must ask of you a note for 200 dollars in such form as may be negociated at the bank. The marks and weights of the 4. hhds. of tobo. which you wished to know are as follows. nett TI. No. 1. 1223℔ }
I have determined to agree to give you 250£. for your house and tenement in my possession as proposed in your letter of the 16th. on condition that you lease it to me for seven years with a right in me to relinquish it at any time after the expiration of the first year on giving you three months previous notice: the new lease to begin as to the bookroom and stable when they are delivered to...
On bringing together my accounts before my departure I find I have occasion for about 50. or 100. dollars more, and should therefore be glad of a note from you to be discounted at the bank for so much. I expect about half a dozen hhds. of tobo. more by captain Stratton during my absence, which please to receive and pay the expences of.—I am Sir Your very humble servt., PrC ( ViU ).
I was in hopes Capt Stratton would have brought the 6. hhds. of my tobo. which still remain at Richmond. But he is come without them. I had waited supposing that on his arrival I might have settled the whole purchase with you. I shall immediately order them by the first vessel without waiting for Stratton. For the present however I must ask the favor of you to furnish me with a thousand...
I received some days ago from Mr. Hylton, the gentleman who forwarded my tobacco to me, the statement below. By this it appears that there were two hhds. of which I had not notice. I presume they came during my absence, and were the two for which there was no bill of lading, and are to be added to the 39. of which I gave you a statement before. The two which he mentions last are now arrived...
My tobacco arrived here yesterday by the Linnet Capt. Weymouth, whom I will direct to deliver it to you. There are 30. hhds, supposed to weigh about 40,000 ℔. but the weights not having been forwarded, it may perhaps be necessary for you to weigh it here. Instead of sending the money on to Richmond, the Gentleman for whom it was destined writes me word he will be here between the 8th. and...
Not doubting but that the judgment formed by Mr. Strawbridge and yourself of the value of my tobacco is just, I agree to take the price you propose of four dollars and a half the hundred. I am Sir Your very humble servt., PrC ( MHi ).
I recieved by yesterday’s post a letter from the gentleman who was to have come on himself and embarked from hence or New York for England. He writes me that his business not permitting him to come this way he is to embark from Richmond on the 15th. or 16th. As the whole object of my operations with my tobacco has been to pay him the sum of money I am pledged to pay him before his departure, I...
Proposing to leave this for Virginia on Thursday or Friday at farthest I have this morning been settling all my money affairs, and find I cannot square them unless it would be convenient for you, instead of recieving the rent now due in cash, to let me take on myself so much of our joint note for 684. Dollars due at the bank about this day month. With this facility for my rent, I can pay off...
I have made a statement of our account for the last tobacco as herein inclosed, which corresponds with yours, except a small variance in the weight as certified in the paper you gave me, and as entered in your account.—By this you will perceive that of the 1528 Doll. the amount of the notes given in to the bank 424.44 must be provided for by me, and 1103.55 by yourself, that is to say two new...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to Mr. Lieper and, according to the conditions of his lease , informs him he shall relinquish it at the end of three months from this date. He thinks it probable he can find a good tenant for Mr. Lieper, and shall do it with pleasure. Nothwithstanding what was done by the plaisterer the passage leaked excessively with the last rain.—Th:J. will be obliged...
I have received your favor of yesterday and cannot but think you will retire from the proposition of my finishing the house in the garden when you recollect what has past between us, and recur to the lease wherein all our stipulations were ultimately settled.—Our first agreement was £150. for the house and you to make such additions as should be agreed on, adding 6. per Cent on their cost to...
According to an arrangement with Mr. Wilson , who was to succeed me in your house, I have continued in it till now. We have at length got every thing out of it except an article which will be taken away to-day or tomorrow. The coachman’s wife also who happened to lay in on Sunday last, has Mr. Wilson ’s permission to remain till she can safely remove. I have had every repair made which...
Your favors of Oct. 9. & 16. came to hand in due time, as has done that also of Nov. 26. in the country we put off writing letters to a rainy day, and are apt then to take up what is most pressing. your first letter being an answer to mine, and the terms for my tobo inferior to what I was offered in Richmond, the replying to it yielded to some others more immediately urgent. I had been assured...
A circumstance has arisen in Philadelphia in which I must ask your friendly aid, because nobody in the world is so able to judge of it as yourself. Messrs. Gibson & Jefferson, as my agents in Richmond, sold my crop of Bedford & Albemarle tobo. of the growth of 1799. to McMurdo & Fisher of Richmond for 6. D. a hundred payable Apr. 1. this sale was made about the latter part of Nov. last of...
I am much indebted to you for the trouble you have been so good as to take with messrs. Jackson & Wharton, on the subject of my tobo. for tho’ I am under no obligation to have any thing to do with them, my tobo. having been sold to Mc.Murdo & Fisher of Richmond, yet had there been any fraud in the package of the tobo. I should have no hesitation to relieve them from it. but from your favors of...
I propose in two or three days to make a short excursion home to make some arrangements previously neecessary to my final settlement here. I cannot go till I have thanked you for the trouble you took in the late case of my tobo. which as to the complaints I suppose had it’s origin in feelings no way derived from the quality of the tobo. my crop of the last year, about [40,000] is lying at...
Your favor of Nov. is recieved. my crop of tobacco of the last year’s growth was sold in April. that lately severed will be small; the crop of tobacco this year being generally short. mine will not be half a one. I fear too the quality will be indifferent; at least that was the expectation when I was at home in September. in that case I always sell in Richmond where they are less anxious about...
Your favors of June 3. were duly recieved. I made the last year but little tobacco, and my overseer informed me it was not good. it was deemed generally an unfavorable year both for the quality and quantity of tobacco made. in consideration of the quality I have lodged mine at Richmond with a view of selling it there; and had authorised my correspondent to take 6. D. @ 90. days for it. I have...
I had hoped, when I retired from the business of the world, that I should have been permitted to pass the evening of life in tranquility, undisturbed by the peltings and passions of which the public papers are the vehicles. I see however that I have been dragged into the newspapers by the infidelity of one with whom I was formerly intimate, but who has abandoned the American principles out of...
A journey soon after the reciept of your favor of April 17. and an absence from home of some continuance has prevented my earlier acknolegement of it. in that came safely my letter of Jan. 2. 14. in our principles of government we differ not at all, nor in the general object & tenor of political measures. we concur in considering the government of England as totally without morality, insolent...
I am subject to a Corvée of a very painful nature which I resist whenever it is possible, but in some cases cannot avoid. it is to sollicit offices for others, who through themselves or their friends, have some hold on me of friendship or of duty. it is understood that application is made for the establishment of a branch of the bank of the US. in the town of Fredericksburg ; and a mr Bernard...
This will be handed you by mr a student of medicine of this neighborhood who goes to Philada to compleat his studies. in that line . having no acquantance there he naturally wishes that his standing & character in his own state may be known to somebody there , and being the eleve of my family physician, & having under him attended me kindly and assiduously thro’ a long illness I feel myself...
M r George Lieper your son has informed you that in his passage thro’ the neighboring county of Orange he had the misfortune to lose his baggage. he called on me in distress and I was happy in the opportunity of being useful to him by giving him a draught negociable in Charlottesville for 75.D. the sum he asked and he gave me a counterdraught on you. on his return to Charlottesville he met...
Your favor of the 19 th is recieved, and I percieve I have been taken in, and it is not for the first time by strangers pretending to be the sons of my friends. in this case the statement by the applicant calling himself your son was that in passing thro the neighboring county of Orange, in the night, & embarrassed in deep roads, his trunk was cut from behind his gig, that he was on his way to...
On my late return from Bedford I found here your three favors of May 9. 13. and [blank] the millet you have been so kind as to send me is not yet arrived. accept my thanks for it, as well as for the details as to it’s culture and produce. I shall turn it over to my grandson Th: J. Randolph, to whom I have committed the management of the whole of my agricultural concerns, in which I was never...
I am really done, my friend, with Politics, notwthstg the doubts you express in your favor of Mar. 16. there is a time for every thing, for acting in this world, and for getting ready to leave it . the last is now come upon me. you, I hope, will hold out as long as you can, because what you do, I know will always be done for the good of our fellow-man. with respect to the European combinns...
Your favor of the 14 th was rec d yesterday Your son in law, the son of D r Patterson the elder and D r Patterson the son himself have a right to every service I can render them. I have not hesitated then to write to the President on the subject of your lre and to add my testimony to your’s in favor of your friend and connection. there was one point unknown to myself and on which your lre was...
Since my solicitation of July 22. at your request the ground on which I stand is entirely changed, and it is become impossible for me to ask any thing further from the govmt. I cannot explain this to you, and even request you not to mention the fact. I should not have sent it to you, but that I cannot offer you false excuses. my frdshp for you is the same , but this method of proving it is no...
Be assured, dear Sir, that the reasons which put it out of my power to interfere in behalf of mr Taylor, were such as yourself would pronounce insuperable had it been proper for me to have mentioned them.—we shall be happy to recieve your son and daughter here whenever they will favor us with their visit. Richmond was not well chosen as the place to shake off a fever and ague. in the months of...
Your letter of the 23d. should have been sooner answered had it been in my power. but it is of the less importance, as using that frankness which I know you will approve. I do not feel myself free to answer the question you propose. it was taken up by the Senate at the last session: it may be again at this session, and may come to me from one or both houses on an official form. I ought...
This is merely a private letter, intended for yourself individually. if I have not answered the very friendly and flattering address I recieved through you, and the many others I have recieved, it is not from an insensibility to their kind and gratifying contents. no man feels them more powerfully than I do; no breast ever felt more consolation from such testimonies of good will. and the...
I pray you to consider this letter so confidential as not to be hinted even, to your most intimate friends. you propose General Steele as the successor to the present collector. the following circumstances are to be considered. it is indispensable that the head of the Indian department reside at the seat of government. Genl. Shee was apprised of this at the time of his appointment. it was soon...
I recieved your favor of Apr. 22. a little before I was to leave Washington, much engaged with dispatching the business rendered necessary by the acts of Congress just risen, & preparatory to a short visit to this place. here again I have been engrossed with some attentions to my own affairs after a long absence, added to the public business which presses on me here as at Washington. I mention...
Your letter of the 15th. was duly recieved, and before that Tower’s book, which you had been so kind as to send me, had come to hand, for which I pray you to recieve my thanks. you judge rightly that here , I have no time to read. a cursory view of the book shews me that the author is a man of much learning in his line. I have heard of some other late writer (the name I forget) who has...