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Your favour of this date, is this instant put into my hands (at Weedons & almost dark) the mode you propose of determining the claim, upon Colo. George Lees Estate, will be perfectly agreeable to me; but as my Brothers are as much concernd in the matter as I am, I would choose to have there concurrance before I did any thing final & should be obligd to you to for mentioning of this matter to...
If this Letter should (though I do not See any probable chance of it) reach your hands in time, it is to ask, if you do not think it necessary that the Deputies from this Colony should be provided with authentick Lists of our Exports, & Imports generally, but more especially to Great Britain? and, in that case, to beg of you to obtain such from the Custom House Offices on Potomack & Rappa.; as...
I was exceeding glad to receive a Letter from you, as I always shall be whenever it is convenient, though perhaps my hurry, till such time as matters are drawn a little out of the Chaos they appear in at present, will not suffer me to write you such full and satisfactory answers, or give such clear, and precise accts of our Situation & views, as I could wish, or you might expect. After a...
Your favour of the first Inst. by Mr Randolph came safe to hand—the merits of this young Gentleman, added to your recommendation, & my own knowledge of his character, induced me to take him into my Family as an Aid de Camp in ⟨the room of⟩ Mr Mifflin who I have appointed Quarter Master Genel from a thorough perswation of his Integrety—my own experience of his activity—and finaly, because he...
Letter not found: to Richard Henry Lee, 13 Oct. 1775. On 22 Oct. Lee wrote to GW : “I thank you for your obliging favor of the 13th.”
As you will be fully informed of every matter and thing relative to the army, by your own Committee I should not have given you the trouble of a Letter at this time were it not on Colo. Reeds acct—He is, as I presume you may have heard, concernd in many of the principal Causes now depending in the Courts of Pensylvania and should those Causes be press’d for tryal by his brethren of the...
I mean but to acknowledge the receipt of your obliging favour of the 22d ultimo; for, as I expect this letter will be handed to you in Philadelphia, to recite the contents of my letter to the Congress would be little more than idle repetition. I should be very glad if the Congress would, without delay, appoint some mode by which an examination into the captures made by our armed vessels may be...
The Course of Events, naturally turns the Thoughts of Gentlemen to the Subjects of Legislation and Jurisprudence, and it is a curious Problem what Form of Government, is most readily and easily adopted by a Colony, upon a Sudden Emergency. Nature and Experience have already pointed out the Solution of this Problem, in the Choice of Conventions and Committees of safety. Nothing is wanting in...
Your favour of the 13th with the Inclosures (for which I thank you) came to this place on Wednesday Evening; part of which—that is the Night—I was engaged with a party of Men throwing up a Work upon A Hill called Cobble Hill; which, in case we should ever be supplied with such things as we want, may proove useful to us, & could not be delayed, as the Earth here is getting as hard as a Rock...
Your favour of the 6th Instt did not reach this place till Saturday Afternoon. the Money which accompanied it, came seasonably, but not (as it was so long delayed) in quantum Sufficit—our demands at this time being peculiarly great for pay, and advance to the Troops—pay for their Arms—Blanketting &ca Independant of the demands of the Commissary & Quarter Master General. Lord Dunmores Letters...
Your favour of the 26th Ulto came to my hands last Night by the Post, but as I am upon the point of setting out for New York (by the way of Providence and Norwich) I can do little more than acknowledge the receipt of it, and thank you for the Proceedings & Ordinances of the Virga Convention which came safely to hand. At present, the Lakes are in an Impassable State, neither being clear of Ice,...
In great haste I write you a few lines to cover the Inclosed—they came in the manner you see them, and as explaind in Captn Langdens Letter to me—I hesitated sometime in determining whether I could, with propriety, select them from the rest considering in what manner they came to my hands, but as there are somethings in each which may serve to irritate I concluded it best to send not only the...
For news I refer you to your brother who writes on that head. I enclose you a copy of the declaration of independence as agreed to by the House, and also, as originally framed. You will judge whether it is the better or worse for the Critics. I shall return to Virginia after the 11th of August. I wish my successor may be certain to Come before that time, in that case, I shall hope to see you...
We received your letter by post and are much obliged for the enclosures. The queries to the officers shall be answered by this post if we can; otherwise certainly by the next. I suppose it will be best to send the answer to Brigadr. Lewis. Leich’s affair shall also be taken care of.—Admiral Howe is arrived at New York, and two or three vessels, supposed to be of his fleet, were in sight. The...
I inclose you Dr. Price’s pamphlet . I should have done so sooner but understood your brother was sending many to Virginia and not doubting one would be to you, I laid by the one I had purchased for that purpose. Little new here. Our camps recruit slowly, amazing slowly. God knows in what it will end. The finger of providence has as yet saved us by retarding the arrival of Ld. Howe’s recruits....
Your last favour, by the purport of it (having no date) as also one or two others at different periods, have come safe to my hands; and went unacknowledged from the hurried, and distracted state of our Affairs, & from the knowledge I had, that every occurrance worth noticing came regularly to you in my Letters to Congress. I thank you Sir for the mention of Colo. Heartly, and finding upon...
I am anxious to know whether Genl Arnolds non promotion was owing to Accident or design—& the cause of it. Surely a more active—a more spirited, and Sensible Officer fills no department in your Army—Not seeing him then in the list of Majr Genls, and no mention made of him, has given me uneasiness, as it is not to be presumed (being the oldest Brigadr) that he will continue in Service under...
I have been favor’d with two or three Letters from you lately—the last which came to hand was with out date, but containd an extract of Doctr Lee’s Letter to the Secret Comee—and the French Generals Ideas of the Measures necessary for us to pursue in prosacuting the War with G. Britn —for both of which I sincerely thank you, as the communication of such matters cannot fail of having a proper...
This Letter will be delivered to you by the Chevalier D’annmours, who, if I am not mistaken in my judgment, has something more in view than preferment. In the course of two days conversation with him, he appears to me, to be a man of superior abilities to the common run of his Country men, who have visited us—He is sensible & judicious, &, as far as I am capable of judging, well Instructed in...
Under the previledge of friendship, I take the liberty to ask you, what Congress expects I am to do with the many Foreigners they have, at different times, promoted to the Rank of Field Officers? and by the last resolve, two to that of Colonels. In making these appointments, it is much to be feared that all the Circumstances attending; are not taken into consideration—To oblige the adventurers...
By your favour of the 22d Ulto I perceive my Letter of the 17th has been expressed in too strong terms. I did not mean by the words, “to get rid of importunity” to cast the smallest reflection; indeed the hurry with which I am obliged to write the few private Letters I attempt, will not allow me to consider the force & tendency of my Words; nor should I have been surprizd if the fact had...
Your favour of the 5th Inst. as also that of the 11th by Baron Kalb, are both to hand —It is not in my power at present to answer your quere respecting the appointment of this Gentleman; but Sir, if there is any truth in the report which has been handed to me, viz.—that congress has appointed Brigadier conway to be Major Gen[e]ral in this Army, it will be as unfortunate a measure, as ever was...
The report of Genl Conways promotion was so prevalent, and came from such authority—among others from Baron Kalb, who told me, that by some Members of Congress he was informd that it either had, or would take place—that I had not a single doubt remaining upon my Mind of the Fact. what I said in my last, was with no design to injure General Conway—nor with a view to serve any individual—I then...
Your favour of the 7th Instant should not have remained so long unanswered, but for the uncertainty of Colonel Pickering’s acceptance of his new Appointment. He has now determined to do this, which leads me to say, that I am really at a loss to recommend a proper person as a Successor to the Office of Adjutant General. The Gentleman I named to you some time ago will not, you say, answer. I...
Your Letter of the 2d Ulto from Chantilly, inclosing Lieutt Colo. Frazers orders for the management of the Granadiers & light Infantry in an action, & upon a March, came to my hands in the course of last Month & merits my thanks, as it may be of use to such Corps, one of which (consisting of light Infantry) we are now forming. The Enemy are governed by no principles that ought to actuate...
If any thing of greater moment, than declaring that every word contained in the Pamphlet you were obliging enough to send me, was spurious, had occurred, I should not have suffered your favor of the 6th Instt to have remained so long unacknowledged—These letters are written with a great deal of art—the intermixture of so many family circumstances (which by the by wanted foundation in truth)...
I am now to acknowledge the receipt of two of your favours, during the session of Assembly, but there being little to communicate to you, and that, being a busy time with me, has prevented my doing it sooner. The Assembly rose on Monday last; their only act, which can shortly aid our army, was one for raising a regiment of horse, which, I think, will be raised as fast as it can be accoutred....
Passy, 25 July 1778. printed: JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:171–172 . In this letter, the last copied from Adams’ Letterbooks into his Autobiography for the period of the first mission, he thanked Lee for his letter of 13 May (above), described his voyage to France, and commented on the...
Your Letter of the 20 June, by Captain Ayrs from Boston had a quick Passage. She Sailed on the 4 July and your Letters were brought to Passi from Bourdeaux, where she arrived, the 3d of August. I thank you sir, for the kind Expressions of your obliging Anxiety for me. The Uncertainty in which you remained so long, concerning the Fate of the Boston, must have been occasioned by the Capture of,...
A few days ago I received your favor of the 26th Ulto, inclosing one from Colo. Spotswood, for which I thank you. The reputation which this Gentn had acquired, of being an attentive Officer and good disciplinarian, was justly founded; and I considered his leaving the Army a loss to the Service. The supposed death of his Brother, it is natural to believe, had a painful influence upon his...